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Equipment Input

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I have skied for years, then stopped for the past two seasons, now I'm getting back into it harder than ever. I just bought last years K2 silencers, this years Marker 11.0 Free bindings, and last years Head Edge 10.8 boots. Does anyone have any input on my new gear, especially the Bindings, I have been hearing mixed feelings about Markers.
post #2 of 13
K2 silencer = Low end twin tip. Adequate for intermediates or light skiers.

Marker 11.0 Bindings = Price point binding well suited to less agressive skiers. More focused on release than retention. Also for lighter skiers.

Head Edge 10.8 boots = High volume boot with thick soft liner. Well suited to higer volume (wider) feet and moderate agressiveness.

SJ
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Well I'm more of a aggresive skier, and from what I've been hearing I'm afraid the bindings are going to release while I'm skiing. Is that true? O I forgot to say I'm about 220 pounds so I'm not really light.
post #4 of 13
I think Jim laid it out about as well as a professional equipment buyer possibly can. When he purchases that equipment for a store, his target consumer is a price-point intermediate. If your skiing is fast or aggressive, or you are a larger skier, this equipment may be on the soft side for you. The Marker 11 is a binding that has generated a lot of complaints among more aggressive skiers for what they call pre-release. It usually occurs with the weight back, and any impact, and it causes the toe to release, even with fairly high spring tension. I find that binding is flexible, and doesn't provide the connection I look for. On the other hand, this is a very very common binding on the hill and its settings are suitable for most recreational skiers. For a twin tip the Public Enemy has a lot of very good reviews in a close price range. Not many reviews on the Silencer on EpicSki, but an internet search found some people who found happiness with them.

Of all the gear you listed, I would be most concerned about the performance level of those boots. Did you shell fit them without the liner?
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
No I didn't shell fit them, I went to a ski shop and they fit them. I've never heard of shell fitting them, what is it? And I might buy K2 pulic enemy's and bindings off my friend for 200 bucks. Is the silencer stiffer then the Public Enemies, or vis virsa.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastjeeps View Post
No I didn't shell fit them, I went to a ski shop and they fit them. I've never heard of shell fitting them, what is it?
If it was a half way decent shop, they/you did it. It involves you trying on boots sans liner, you put your foot into just the shell and they look at how the shape of your foot compares with the shape of the shell, it's a way of finding the right boot for your foot. It means fewer (if any) mods to the boot. Liners will pack out and adjust to the shape of your foot just from skiing, shells will not.

Did you have a footbed made?? This is the most important equipment change most skiers can make, it really does help that much. Its a worty investment, for $150 you have something that should outlast several pairs of boots.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
No I didn't have a footbed made, I originally started this year just wanting to get something cheap to get out there a ski again. I never had my own equipment before, and quickly found out cheap is definetly not the way to go, thats why I'm sorry worried about the marker bindings. Where can I get a footbed made, a regular ski shop?
post #8 of 13
first things first. A footbed can help to secure the foot in a more secure position so that movements from your foot and leg are efficienty transferred through the boot into the ski. Custom footbeds are really expensive, but trim-to-fits footbeds can be very good for most skiers with good conformation and are only 30 to $35 and can be added at any time to replace the stock footbed. This is not your first priority. The boot fit however is the first important transfer point, and a good close boot fit is essential. A good fit means the shell conforms closely to the shape of your foot. The liner is just padding and insulation. A boot can feel great in the store, but if you rely on just feeling good in the liner, you can end up with a sloppy fit after the liner packs.

Shell fit: Pull the liner out of the boot. Then try the shell fit. With you toes just brushing the toe-box, measure or estimate the distance between your heel and the back of the boot shell. 1 cm = about 1 finger width (flat). 2 cm is two fingers. Objective for shell fit is 1 to 1.5 cm. Two cm fit is a comfort fit. More than that and your boots are too big. Check the fit from side to side. You should have a minimum of clearance to the shell with no hot spots. If the fit is not close, your foot will move after the liner packs.

As far as the bindings, go there is nothing inherently wrong with Marker 11 bindings, except that they really are not for agressive skiing or park riding. They are very prone to release when your weight is back and any twisting or shock load occurs. If you plan to jump or do pipe tricks, this may not be your ideal binding.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastjeeps View Post
No I didn't shell fit them, I went to a ski shop and they fit them. I've never heard of shell fitting them, what is it? And I might buy K2 pulic enemy's and bindings off my friend for 200 bucks. Is the silencer stiffer then the Public Enemies, or vis virsa.
PE is way stiffer than the silencer. PE is a very good ski also. Very versatile. You will need the longest length (179) at your weight.

Mike
post #10 of 13
+5 on Cirque's advice, follow his instructions on shell fitting, does this sound like something the shop did? If not go back and ask why.

I'd worry about your binding the least at this point, it's not that bad, there is just somewhat of a bias against marker bindings on this (and other forums), plus its not especially suited for park and pipe, especially for a heavy rider. To get you going again, for a few seasons, it will be more than adequate.

Worry about your boots first, the rest will follow
post #11 of 13
Hi Jeeps. Welcome to epic. Lot's of good advice here already, but you might take a look at the "Ask The Boot Guys" forum. The first 4 threads there are stickys, and have a great deal of information that will serve you well if you read them before you visit a shop/bootfitter. The threads include a glossary, FAQ's and Which Boots Will Work For Me? You'll be a well informed customer, and greatly increase your chance to be a satisfied boot owner.
Enjoy your season.
post #12 of 13
If you only missed two years, you didn't miss too much.
post #13 of 13
East Coast,

I am about 1;30 south on you and would be glad to help you out. PM me if interested.
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