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Volkl Race stock ski's for free skiing

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am thinking about getting some Volkl race stock ski's (probably GS), as they seem to be the only flat skis that you can get from Volkl anymore for front-side carving. I raced for 10 years while growing up, and still love to go fast, but it has been a while and race stock ski's have changed a lot!

Does anyone own race stock ski's and free ski with them? How do you like them?

I don't need them to be able to go off piste too much, as I already have a set of Mantra's that are awesome! I basically want to be able to carve, go fast and enjoy the groomers, and have a ski that isn't completely useless if I do leave the corduroy. An integrated binding system is unacceptable because I need to be able to shim the bindings to get perfect body positioning over the skis.
post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by chutas View Post
I am thinking about getting some Volkl race stock ski's (probably GS), as they seem to be the only flat skis that you can get from Volkl anymore for front-side carving. I raced for 10 years while growing up, and still love to go fast, but it has been a while and race stock ski's have changed a lot!

Does anyone own race stock ski's and free ski with them? How do you like them?

I don't need them to be able to go off piste too much, as I already have a set of Mantra's that are awesome! I basically want to be able to carve, go fast and enjoy the groomers, and have a ski that isn't completely useless if I do leave the corduroy. An integrated binding system is unacceptable because I need to be able to shim the bindings to get perfect body positioning over the skis.
Race stock skis ARE completely useless if you leave the corduroy.
post #3 of 22
A few years ago I used a Volkl GS race stock ski as my everyday ski, I was fine on them.
post #4 of 22
I used my Racetiger 180s (racestock flex) alot last year for freeskiing and loved em out of the course. One of my best times with them (oddly) was a run down Hardscrabble (a bump run) at Cannon. I think when choosing a race ski for free skiing you should look particularly into flex, as a ski too stiff won't be much fun. I have Racetiger 187s that I also used last year, and I scarcely took them out of the course, and they were the Worldcup flex. So far this year I have been enjoying my Tigersharks more than my GS 180's, but conditions haven't really cleared up yet. I would recommend the Tigersharks as they do everything you are really asking for, but I see you want to steer away from the integrated binding scheme. Good luck picking your poison,

RTTT
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric S View Post
Race stock skis ARE completely useless if you leave the corduroy.
It's all I have been skiing on for the last couple of years and I have been having fun in all condition. From hard bumps in the east to ripping the bowls in Whistler and I still have fun and still make it down the hill just fine.
post #6 of 22
They're the best you can get on smooth surfaces but there are more fun skis for everything else. They're very direct and energetic so you feel it when you hit that bump...

That's not to say you can't do it. Many do. Just there are better choices with a bit more versatility.
post #7 of 22
My every day ski is a '04 Volkl P60 GS race stock in a 185. We have similar backgrounds and I find that I need a real stiff ski to hit my stride. Most other skis feel like wet noodles to me. You will be fine.

If you need a fat ski you can always get the Dynastar Legend Pro Rider (it's just a race ski masquerading as a fat board anyway).

For what it is worth the Dynastars feel stiffer than the Volkl race stock racing skis.

If Plake can rip moguls on 223 DH boards you will be fine shredding them on GS race stock skis.
post #8 of 22
On frozen granular or "loud powder" days, I always reach for my pure race stock slaloms for freeskiing.
post #9 of 22
A few seasons ago I had a pair of Head iGS RD's in 180 with a VIST that I skied everywhere. Great skis, super fun in crud, no speed limit. Not so great in bumps, but I skied them most everyday. With that said, if you are looking for versatility, you could do better. If you are looking for hard snow performance first and foremost, the race ski is the tool designed for the job. I am going to get a pair of "race carver" Elan GSX Waveflex skis this year in a shorter length (176) that will be tons of fun on groomers.

Full selection of 2015 skis available right now from Dawgcatching.com.  PM for current deals and discount codes: save up to 25% on mid-season deals. 

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post #10 of 22
The problem with using a race stock ski all-mountain is the difficulty in initiating turns. They're designed to hook up to hard surfaces only and don't turn very well unless there is something to dig the tips firmly into. Race carvers often have flexes that allow skis to hook up in conditions found outside the race course. That would be my recommendation.
post #11 of 22
My race skis are very old SG skis. I like them best on hard snow, but they work fine on any groomed trail or hardpack or ice condition. They don't work so well in bigger moguls or in deep powder. I broke down and bought a Fischer WC SC (one step below race slalom ski) a few years ago. Surprisingly it handles speed fine, and is a lot more versatile than a race ski, but still isn't made for skiing slowly. I purposely got a short radius ski and find I would like a little longer radius ski. A modern GS race ski should be just about perfect for what you want, so long as you keep the speed up and aren't too fussy about mogul performance.
post #12 of 22
I picked up a pair of 3 year old Stockli GS skis last year. I absolutely hate groomers, especially blue ones, but have a good friend I love to ski with who skis nothing but. He probably skis better than I do but will not venture off piste- ever. Now we ski together when we go, and I actually enjoy and appreciate the terrain when I'm on the Stocklis. I was indeed surprised as I was sure they would be way too much of a ski for me. Not so! I must say a nice challenge though. And yes I am learning how to use them when I venture off the corduroy.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric S View Post
Race stock skis ARE completely useless if you leave the corduroy.
Well, that depends on the ski and how you define corduroy. Some SL models are really nice for aggressive rec skiing on days when there's a bit of new winter chop or spring slush over ice (not uncommon), as long as you bring your A game. I see a fair number of good skiers back east on WC SL models from Rossi, Fischer, for instance, in a whole lot of conditions. Obviously not happy in the woods, bumps, or on pow days...
post #14 of 22
I've been skiing for the most part on race stock GS skis for many years {30+}. Home mountain is loaded with buffed cruisers. For about a 5 year period, I was lucky to get a pair of newish hand me downs in a 188 from my son each season if I wanted them. Then he moved to a 191, then a 193; too much for me. My everyday ski became the 184cm Stockli Stormrider XL, about 4 years ago. I have two pairs, including the original red, white and blue graphic with the three layers of metal. That ski is essentially a laminated GS construction with a slightly wider waist. A bit more underfoot.

For me, it does everything that a GS ski will do in terms of it's ability to carve on the rock hard at speed, yet it gives me a bit more forgiveness and versatility in other stuff.....particularly in the East. It's not a powder ski, nor a SL ski. You still need to be centered, and on top of your game, and if you want to make small turns, you'll need to slide them{just like a GS ski}. And they come flat, with any binding option available. I have mine mounted with 10mm VIST risers {not plates} and Solly 916's.

I've skied a couple of the "cheater" GS skis, mostly the Fischer, and while I liked them, I prefer this set-up. I'm on firm, groomed cruisers for 90% of my skiing. I still ski the GS skis from time to time, but find that the XL's don't give away anything in terms of free skiing. I don't think they'd initiate the turn properly in a race course. Tends to carve a rounder turn. My $.02.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post
I've been skiing for the most part on race stock GS skis for many years {30+}. Home mountain is loaded with buffed cruisers. For about a 5 year period, I was lucky to get a pair of newish hand me downs in a 188 from my son each season if I wanted them. Then he moved to a 191, then a 193; too much for me.

I think this is the key point. If you stay in the 180-183 range you will find that they are a lot more useable (and fun!) for your intended purpose. I have the Fischer WC GS in a 178, 183 and 193. The 178 and 183 work great for me in both gates and free skiing. The 193 is a different beast and while great for going quickly (i use it as a Masters SG ski) it takes a lot more work, and more space, for free skiing.
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am 5'9", 160. Do you think that I could go as small as the 175 or even the 180 racetiger GS, and be able to manipulate them a little more?
post #17 of 22
I would not consider the 175....a junior ski, essentially. The 180 is a woman's ski, as is the 183. There are also some 185's, though I don't think they are in regular distribution. You'd probably be fine on the 180 or the 183. I might lean towards the 183 if you can find one. My brother is about your size, and one of his favorite skis is a "real" woman's WC GS ski in a 182.
post #18 of 22
My Dynastar Speed Course Comp's race stock (gold serial) work fine for me. I'm mostly on the groomers. Cruizing or making high-speed long arcs.

I've got the 187's. But I'm tall. (2 meters/ 6'7") and have some weight (110Kg /253 lb).

The only time I dislike them when I'm skiing with my girl. (She ski's for the third week in snow plough style and pretty slow). You need some speed to make the arc's without hard work.

My race stock ski's came with pre drilled plates. I needed to redrill them because of my shoe size (12US, 45EU, 30MONDO). I do not want to have ski's with much flex because of my weight.

So. For a tall guy.... Race stock is fine as long as you're on the groomers.

Oops. Just bumped a topic from the stoneages.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by chutas View Post
An integrated binding system is unacceptable because I need to be able to shim the bindings to get perfect body positioning over the skis.
get your boots ground to the right angle and never worry about this again
make sure you go somewhere that does this right and isn't using epoxy to build the toe/heel back up to DIN standard
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Have you had this done Waxman? I know a place that would do a great job, but I am hesitant to make that kind of commitment to an angle on my boots, where I am scared that I might not have it perfectly figured out yet...
post #21 of 22
I you do an Epic Ski search on something like "boot alignment", you should see a number of fairly recent threads on this subject, and the full wide range of opinions. If you need an alignment correction {as you seem convinced that you do}, my recommendation is to see the best boot technician that you can. He will evaluate you, measure you and recommend how best to correct this. I would follow his recommendation, and just do it. There's some degree of science to this.

IMO, the best way to go is to have the boot soles planed {along with the lugs}, so that you can click into any bindings and go. Cant the boots, not the skis. I'm personally not a believer in doing it any other way, though others certainly are. I have two kids who are pretty skilled racers. One needs no canting; the other needs quite a bit. He boot company spends hours dialing her in. I believe in it. Again, in my opinion, if you need it, having it done generally results in significant improvements to your skiing.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by chutas View Post
Have you had this done Waxman? I know a place that would do a great job, but I am hesitant to make that kind of commitment to an angle on my boots, where I am scared that I might not have it perfectly figured out yet...
nope, don't have to as i have perfect feet that fit in the best boots made....but it is the latest thing that people want to spend money on...while they ski around on untuned and unwaxed skis...
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