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Choosing Skis

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ive been searching this sight among others for the skis that are probably right for me. I also have went to two local shops to ask for advice, but you can never trust the advice because they just want to sell you their product. I am about 6'2 and 225lbs, 22 and athletically built. I would classify myself as a level 5 or 6 skiier as I am not really experienced in carving, but can handle the blues some blacks. I ski on the east coast with often icy conditions. I have been looking at the Atomic Metrons 7 or 9? also the Zenith Z5 and Z9's. Also the K2 Raiders. Are these skiis too advanced for me? and what size do you think I should go with 170 or like 178?
post #2 of 13
The best resource I've found for selecting skis is Peter Keelty's subscription web site, http://www.realskiers.com/. It is $20 very well spent. From Peter's information you can select skis for a demo list. If at all possible, try before you buy. Even if any of us could put together a list of skis totally suitable for you, you probably would prefer a different ski than I would or than the next poster would like. Which ski on your demo list is right for you?...the one that puts the biggest smile on your face. Try for a demo day where many vendors have their products out, or find a shop at the hill that will let you try many different skis for one rental charge.

Ski length is highly proportional to ski stiffness. At your height and weight, and improving skill level, an almost-top line ski in (probably) their longest length will be right for you. For your type of skiing, I'd recommend a narrow waisted ski, no more than 73mm under foot and mid-sixties is better, with a sidecut radius of 14 meters or less.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
For your type of skiing, I'd recommend a narrow waisted ski, no more than 73mm under foot and mid-sixties is better, with a sidecut radius of 14 meters or less.
Skis of that description (basically ones derived from slalom race skis) will carve very tight turns, and hold extremely well on ice and hardpack. However, you might have issues with them in more variable snow conditions -- this is not as big a concern on the east coast, but it can happen a lot in the early or late season.

Something on the narrow side of the "all-mountain" category (in a 72-78mm width) would be somewhat more versatile. The Zeniths and Metrons you mentioned are both in this category. For K2, I'd look more at the Crossfire or Ranger, since they run a little narrower and would be better on harder surfaces. (They also have a new "Sidewinder" that is between the Crossfire and Recon.) You might also try something like a Head SuperShape Speed. That is more like a GS ski -- better at speed than if you're going slow, but will hold great on firm snow or ice. The upgraded Head Xenon 8.0 or 10.0 might also be a really fun ski -- the new ones are supposed to be stiffer than last year's models, which was my biggest complaint about them. Personally, I'm on Dynastar Contacts (the "Limited Edition" from last year, which is this year's Contact 10), which I like a lot.

Frankly, there are a lot of good skis out there. What it boils down to is finding one that works well for you. realskiers.com is well worth it if you want trustworthy descriptions of many different skis. However, demoing is still extremely helpful in figuring out what you like. If you can find an on-mountain (or near-mountain) shop with a bunch of skis you want to try, you can often test multiple pairs of skis in a day for the same price as demoing one pair.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
The best resource I've found for selecting skis is Peter Keelty's subscription web site, http://www.realskiers.com/. It is $20 very well spent. From Peter's information you can select skis for a demo list. If at all possible, try before you buy. Even if any of us could put together a list of skis totally suitable for you, you probably would prefer a different ski than I would or than the next poster would like. Which ski on your demo list is right for you?...the one that puts the biggest smile on your face. Try for a demo day where many vendors have their products out, or find a shop at the hill that will let you try many different skis for one rental charge.

Ski length is highly proportional to ski stiffness. At your height and weight, and improving skill level, an almost-top line ski in (probably) their longest length will be right for you. For your type of skiing, I'd recommend a narrow waisted ski, no more than 73mm under foot and mid-sixties is better, with a sidecut radius of 14 meters or less.
What he said.
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
I found a pair of last yr's K2 Apache Strykers for a real good price and I think I might go with those. Anyone think these skis would be good for what I am looking for? They are the 174 cm size.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by akeaton View Post
I found a pair of last yr's K2 Apache Strykers for a real good price and I think I might go with those. Anyone think these skis would be good for what I am looking for? They are the 174 cm size.
Too soft for your weight and too soft for icy conditions. It is a beginner ski for light to mid-weights; not a ski for a 220 pound skier to learn how to carve on hard icy slopes. You would probably find it unstable at speed too.

Spend the 20 bucks, there are dozens of skis rated that would do from the last several years.
post #7 of 13
The Nordica Top Fuel being sold to forum members on special by SierraJim in this thread http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=76585
is an expert ski and may be a bit aggressive for you, but is very high performance for the kind of skiing your are describing. At your size a 178 is most appropriate, but for a level 6 go with the 170, It will have plenty of guts and will hold up to your weight. You are big enough that this ski is going to work for you, whereas softer skis will not hold the same edge for you. If you have questions, just PM or post to SJ, he will give you an honest and informed answer.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Spent the 20 bucks to real skiers...do u think that due to my weight, I should be looking at something with metal in it? Also would the Rossi Z9 be too much ski for me?
post #9 of 13
I think you should make a short list with the following criteria:
Length about 175 give or take 5 cm;
13 to 17 m side cut turn radius
Blue and black skier icon shown on Keelty's site (bonus if it includes green as well).
Carving number of 4 or more;
Speed zone (if available for that year) includes upper range, bonus if it includes all ranges).

Then buy the best deal out of that list.

Other factors to consider: Fischer will feel more lively, Atomic more solid, Dynastar and Elan more Damp.

Be sure to understand what all the symbols mean. Don't get too hung up on the ability levels. I like the black icon skis, but I'm no pro!

Also when you find a ski on sale somewhere or on e bay from a few years ago you can look it up and see what it's like. I have yet to try out a ski at a demo day that was different from what Peter's reviews said, and I've tried about a dozen of them.

I haven't skied the z9, but it looks good on paper, unless you also want to ski slowly.

I wouldn't worry about wether it had metal in it or not, though I would be surprised if a ski stiff enough for you did not have some metal in it.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ive narrowed my search down to the Dynastar Contact 9, 10 & 11. This is due to the rave reviews on here and realskiers. Also I like the fischer rx8's but they are about impossible to find. The dynastars would be in the 72mm length. Any input on these ideas? Are these skiis too much for me?
post #11 of 13
Contact 11 is Good.
Ithink you mean 72 mm wide; 72 mm length is a too short. Go for 172 or 178 cm in length. Contact groove would be good too.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
I think I will get the contact 10 or 11 in the 172cm length...Thanks for all the help, especially you Ghost.
post #13 of 13
By all reviews I've seen the contact 11 is a great choice.
IMO (I've skied the Z9) I would not go for that ski. I know some like it, but I thought it was a damp version of the Metron.
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