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Ski length questions

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
First a little bit of background: Iv been skiing since I was 7 or 8 (I'm 20 now) and first started on snow blades. Iv transitioned to normal skis now and when I rent skis the rental guys looks at me like I'm crazy when I rent 158's. I'm 6' tall and weigh 225lbs. Iv never had any issues with stability even while diving straight down a slope. Would it be advantagious to try for longer skis (say, 160 or 165 this season)? I like to maintain manuverability and Im worried that longer skis will be hindering.

I like to ski fast, and usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place. I also like to find anything that can get me airborne, from going in the backcountry to skiing straight over mogul fields.

So has anyone been hindered by longer skis or use shorter skis for increased manuverability?
post #2 of 21
IMO you better take some lessons and learn how to ski correctly before you hurt yourself or someone else. Anyone who knows how to ski, doesn't go, "diving straight down the slope".

You should be on at least 170cm ski.
post #3 of 21
The OP is more likely than not a troll. Exhibit #1: "usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place". Exhibit #2: "would it be advantagous to try a longer ski (say, 160 or 165)". Exhibit #3: first post and Chaos hasn't been around the last few minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
Anyone who knows how to ski, doesn't go, "diving straight down the slope".
On the contrary, lots of people who are actually pretty good skiers rutinely go "diving straight down the slope".
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
First a little bit of background: Iv been skiing since I was 7 or 8 (I'm 20 now) and first started on snow blades. Iv transitioned to normal skis now and when I rent skis the rental guys looks at me like I'm crazy when I rent 158's. I'm 6' tall and weigh 225lbs. Iv never had any issues with stability even while diving straight down a slope. Would it be advantagious to try for longer skis (say, 160 or 165 this season)? I like to maintain manuverability and Im worried that longer skis will be hindering.

I like to ski fast, and usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place. I also like to find anything that can get me airborne, from going in the backcountry to skiing straight over mogul fields.

So has anyone been hindered by longer skis or use shorter skis for increased manuverability?
I wouldn't paint yourself into a corner thinking only short skis are right for you. Sure length is very subjective but each ski is different. Softer more noodly skis with less sidecut skis may benefit from added length. Stiff and shapely skis can be plenty stable at speed in short lengths and can have a tendency to ski you at longer lengths. That's why finding a good shop that lets you demo the same ski in mutliple lengths is so invaluable. You'll never really know until you try them and you may be surprised. Or you could just go back to snow blades...those are meant to be skied short.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
I probably should have worded myself better. I only ski straight when I'm in a blue zone or lower, the trail is wide, and not congested. Iv never come close to a collision with another person and never been injured skiing

" The OP is more likely than not a troll. Exhibit #1: "usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place". Exhibit #2: "would it be advantagous to try a longer ski (say, 160 or 165)". Exhibit #3: first post and Chaos hasn't been around the last few minutes."

By longer, I ment longer then what I currently use and listed 160 or 165 because I imagine it would be easier to move up lengths gradually rather then jump up 20cm. And yes, sometimes I do just pivot or if I do carve, do not carve all the way across a trail as some do. However, If I'm on a double black run I will ski wide.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
I probably should have worded myself better. I only ski straight when I'm in a blue zone or lower, the trail is wide, and not congested. Iv never come close to a collision with another person and never been injured skiing.
Don't worry about it Dronac...Max is playing bad cop today.

You may want to find some wood to knock on though.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
First a little bit of background: Iv been skiing since I was 7 or 8 (I'm 20 now) and first started on snow blades. Iv transitioned to normal skis now and when I rent skis the rental guys looks at me like I'm crazy when I rent 158's. I'm 6' tall and weigh 225lbs. Iv never had any issues with stability even while diving straight down a slope. Would it be advantagious to try for longer skis (say, 160 or 165 this season)? I like to maintain manuverability and Im worried that longer skis will be hindering.

I like to ski fast, and usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place. I also like to find anything that can get me airborne, from going in the backcountry to skiing straight over mogul fields.

So has anyone been hindered by longer skis or use shorter skis for increased manuverability?
THIS GUY HAS TO BE A TROLL.
Skiing 13 years at his size on 158's
post #8 of 21
Really no reason at 6' and 225lbs you shouldn't be on at least 175+. If you have any skills what so ever you'll have no problem turning a 177 to 183 ski compared to a 160 ski. Sure super quick turns you'll notice a difference but besides that your ski should ski a hell of alot better overall. Skis have came along ways in technology since you started skiing.
post #9 of 21
There is a difference in maneuverability between different lengths.

Since you have been skiing short skis for so long, you probably have developed some peculiar habits that would cause you difficulties with longer skis.

165 would be a good length for you to begin your transition to proper skiing. Yeah, shorter is more maneuverable, but 165cm is about as maneuverable as you would ever need to be on skis. You should probably be on 176 minimum, but I wouldn't recommend that big a jump all at once.
post #10 of 21
its a troll most likely chaos
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
its a troll most likely chaos
If he is, its a pretty weak troll.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for most of the replies. I think Ill take a day trip and try 165's, then go to 170's or 175's on my main trip in January.

To some of the other's, way to represent the site to a new member.

Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post
THIS GUY HAS TO BE A TROLL.
Skiing 13 years at his size on 158's
Like I said, I started on blades...and I wasn't 6' at 8 years old. Iv never had a issue with stability but it seems that longer = better so I figured I'd see what the advantages of length are.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
First a little bit of background: Iv been skiing since I was 7 or 8 (I'm 20 now) and first started on snow blades. Iv transitioned to normal skis now and when I rent skis the rental guys looks at me like I'm crazy when I rent 158's. I'm 6' tall and weigh 225lbs. Iv never had any issues with stability even while diving straight down a slope. Would it be advantageous to try for longer skis (say, 160 or 165 this season)? I like to maintain maneuverability and Im worried that longer skis will be hindering.

I like to ski fast, and usually ski very narrow, pivoting in place. I also like to find anything that can get me airborne, from going in the backcountry to skiing straight over mogul fields.

So has anyone been hindered by longer skis or use shorter skis for increased manuverability?
ok serious answer now because you might actually be a real person.

A 158 is a rather small ski for someone your size. A longer ski in your case might actually be maneuverable. More edge can turn someone faster who is on a undersized ski going fast IF you skiing with some what 'proper' technique.

You technique is far from proper though and pivoting and skiing very narrow has no advantages for skiing fast. Maybe in bumps but even there a rounder turn is better. If you dont change that there is no reason to try different skis. The biggest difference you can make is realizing that, that style you copied because you thought it was cool isnt and its actually quite useless when skiing with actual good skiers.

IMO 175 to 180 ski is what you should be on.

so curious where do you ski at? smaller hills you can go smaller to make the most of the vertical but if your going fast on bigger hills then longer will work.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
ok serious answer now because you might actually be a real person.

A 158 is a rather small ski for someone your size. A longer ski in your case might actually be maneuverable. More edge can turn someone faster who is on a undersized ski going fast IF you skiing with some what 'proper' technique.

You technique is far from proper though and pivoting and skiing very narrow has no advantages for skiing fast. Maybe in bumps but even there a rounder turn is better. If you dont change that there is no reason to try different skis. The biggest difference you can make is realizing that, that style you copied because you thought it was cool isnt and its actually quite useless when skiing with actual good skiers.

IMO 175 to 180 ski is what you should be on.

so curious where do you ski at? smaller hills you can go smaller to make the most of the vertical but if your going fast on bigger hills then longer will work.
I'v skied Winterplace, WV mostly over the years since I live in NC but the last few trips have been to Alta, Park City, and Breckenridge (Heaven on Earth IMHO). This season Im going to Snowshoe, WV since its still fairly close.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
I'v skied Winterplace, WV mostly over the years since I live in NC but the last few trips have been to Alta, Park City, and Breckenridge (Heaven on Earth IMHO). This season Im going to Snowshoe, WV since its still fairly close.
probably go more like 170-175 eventually.

also if you ever want to meet other internerds to ski with dcski.com is a great place for you to meet some people in your local area.
post #16 of 21
Dronac welcome to EpicSki. For someone of your size who wants to ski faster and in ungroomed terrain, a longer ski with less sidecut is going to be a big help. I think its premature for you to consider backcountry skiing unless you hook up with a professionally guided tour, cat or heli skiing. Since you ski a blend of the east and west, I think a length from 170 to 180, and a width from 78 to 90 mm is going to be your "sweet spot". If you are looking for a deal, you might want to check out this link from one of our sponsors. You would very much benefit from some coaching to get you moving in the right direction, and chances are you will need some better boots. If you have the opportunity to have your boots professionally evaluated, that is what I recommend as a first step.

Read thrugh some of the ski reviews and try to narrow your choices down and feel free to ask questions here. Its pretty hard to just start making recommendations when we don't know much about you as a skier yet.

For the members accusing this person of being a troll, please don't accuse new members of trolling. Anyone can report a a post to the moderators if they feel it is in some respect a sock puppet, fraudulent or misleading, and they will get a fair reply or action from the moderators. As the ski season gets into full swing, we will see more questions from beginning or infrequent skiers. Please try to give them the benefit of the doubt and welcome them to EpicSki. If you suspect a bad post, report it. Someone who is really "playing us" will reveal themselves pretty quickly. This was not a person who deserved this kind of welcome.
post #17 of 21
Short skis teach people a lot about skiing. They teach you to be centered and are easy to turn. Ski length is a personal preference. You need to pick ski lengths that you like, not what someone else thinks is appropriate.

I'm 6'1" and spent a year on 120cm Atomics. I still have a pair I use regularly. They are great for teaching. I also had a pair of Solomon 150 cm Verse skis. They taught me a bunch about shaped skis. I literally wore them out. I now ski on 163 cm skis and really like them.

My recommendation is to do a bunch of demoing. All types, all lengths, all makers. Then decide for yourself which you really like. After all you ski for your own pleasure and fun. Don't let other people shoehorn you into something that doesn't fit your style.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
Short skis teach people a lot about skiing. They teach you to be centered and are easy to turn. Ski length is a personal preference. You need to pick ski lengths that you like, not what someone else thinks is appropriate.

I'm 6'1" and spent a year on 120cm Atomics. I still have a pair I use regularly. They are great for teaching. I also had a pair of Solomon 150 cm Verse skis. They taught me a bunch about shaped skis. I literally wore them out. I now ski on 163 cm skis and really like them.

My recommendation is to do a bunch of demoing. All types, all lengths, all makers. Then decide for yourself which you really like. After all you ski for your own pleasure and fun. Don't let other people shoehorn you into something that doesn't fit your style.

Would you agree that people on skis to short for them tend to muscle their ski alot more than someone on longer skis? You can muscle shorter skis, a longer more demanding ski will reward proper inputs at higher speeds.

Most people who skis on blades first have alot of upper body rotary problems because they are self taught and turning your upper body works when you skis is 100cm long. Its does not work when your on the proper size ski.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dronac View Post
So has anyone been hindered by longer skis or use shorter skis for increased manuverability?
How controlled and maneuverable are you on ice?
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Would you agree that people on skis to short for them tend to muscle their ski alot more than someone on longer skis? You can muscle shorter skis, a longer more demanding ski will reward proper inputs at higher speeds.

Most people who skis on blades first have alot of upper body rotary problems because they are self taught and turning your upper body works when you skis is 100cm long. Its does not work when your on the proper size ski.
I agree with BushWacker. From my experience, a skinny 200+cm racing ski will teach 130 lb skier a lot about proper skiing inputs, especially in deeper snow. However it would be a hard taskmaster, and might not be suitable for all learners.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Would you agree that people on skis to short for them tend to muscle their ski alot more than someone on longer skis? You can muscle shorter skis, a longer more demanding ski will reward proper inputs at higher speeds.
No need to worry speed because short skis don't go too fast, regardless of skill. Also, for a novice to anything less than advanced, there's a lot less muscling involved when skiing on shorter skis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Most people who skis on blades first have alot of upper body rotary problems because they are self taught and turning your upper body works when you skis is 100cm long. Its does not work when your on the proper size ski.
This is only true if one is self taught (like many youngsters). If one uses blades properly, it allows for very nice edge to edge transition without much of a countering problem.
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