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New bindings

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just bought a new pair of skis (Scott Punishers, 172 cm) but I don't have any bindings for them. I'm about 5'9" and 165lbs and I would consider myself as between an intermediate and expert skiier, closer to expert. I ski on mainly blacks and double blacks and I do a lot of moguls and glades. However, I have no idea where to beging when looking for bindings. Any suggestions for DIN settins or anything else? If you need any more info let me know and thanks in advance for the help.
post #2 of 19
In my experience pretty much any modern binding will do the job. My personal favorite is LOOK (AKA Rossignol or Dynastar). With your weight and skill level you should be fine with either PX14 or PX12 (i..e DIN going up to 14 or 12), so you don;pt necessarily need the top of the line race binding. For comparison, I am 6ft, 187lb (on a good day) and I am fine with PX12 which I ski at DIN8.5. Of course, all settings are personal. I am not going to recommend you DIN settings over the internet, I am not sure it is even legal; however any shop that would mount your bindings will be able to set the DIN.

There is a bunch of places to get bindings from, go to a local retailer if you know them well, do a search on the web, or look at the EBay/Craigslist. If you can find last years stuff, it may be cheap, this year's gear will be expensive. Good luck,

Alex
post #3 of 19
Do some of the Marker bindings still release when they should retain the boot?

Bindings need to be able to have the boot get knocked partway out and then pull the boot back into position. Most bindings do that well...except certain Markers, and someone here will know which models were poor in this regard. I ski on Head/Tyrolia, Salomon, and Look/Rossi, and all serve me very well. One shop I patronize tells me that the Tyrolias test very consistently and accurately when they test the release settings, more so that some other brands--one of my Salomons tests low for the setting.

The higher priced bindings in a line are likely more durable, as well as having better retention, and for your skiing style, you probably need both those attributes.

DIN setting depends on the chart of your size, age, and ability. Most of us stay in their skis fine at these settings unless they have a skiing style that twists their boots out of the bindings.
post #4 of 19
x2 on all these recommendations. Any modern 12DIN binding should work quite well for you. Markers are an interesting subject on EpicSki... I ski on Tyrolias/Head Mojo11's myself.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
How do the Salomon STH 12's sound?
post #6 of 19
Any non Biotec toe Marker, Vist, Look, or Salomon binding that goes to 11 would do fine.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
Any non Biotec toe Marker, Vist, Look, or Salomon binding that goes to 11 would do fine.
What do you have against a Tyrolia based binding?

RE Vist: As much as I like these bindings, make sure you have someone that can mount them before you buy them.
post #8 of 19
Consider KneeBinding?
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
One shop I patronize tells me that the Tyrolias test very consistently and accurately when they test the release settings, more so that some other brands--one of my Salomons tests low for the setting.
I do like Tyrolia after years of not knowing/caring/wanting them.

Which Salomon are you having problems with? When I used to work in a shop, the only clamps we ever had issues with were Marker.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Are the Salomon STH 12's any good? Also, my DIN setting most likely wouldn't get up to 14, but would it be worth it to get the STH 14 over the STH 12 in case I ever need that setting?
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JcTonetti9 View Post
Are the Salomon STH 12's any good? Also, my DIN setting most likely wouldn't get up to 14, but would it be worth it to get the STH 14 over the STH 12 in case I ever need that setting?
Of course they are; so are Markers, Tyrolias, Looks, & Rossi. Most bindings on the market are "good", as most of them offer reasonably good protection against lower extremity fractures and pre-release. Though you may see some passionate opinions one way or the other, they all work fine within their respective DIN ranges.

The only binding that may offer something really different form the others (that I know of) is the KneeBinding, which is new this year.

It's rare that a rec. skier would ever need a DIN above 12. Unless you're a World Cup racer, a huge NFL linebacker, or doing major, major hucks, you're unlikely to ever need the 13 or 14 DIN setting.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Ok, thanks for all the adavice.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rick View Post
It's rare that a rec. skier would ever need a DIN above 12. Unless you're a World Cup racer, a huge NFL linebacker, or doing major, major hucks, you're unlikely to ever need the 13 or 14 DIN setting.
Tiny (I mean really really really tiny) feet??
post #14 of 19

But look where that (sort of) logically leads us...

Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post
Tiny (I mean really really really tiny) feet??
I dunno if we even want to go there...if you have tiny feet, don't you generally have tiny hands?

Which leads us to the following question: are the really high DIN settings on some factory bindings there to help some guys compensate for something?
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rick View Post
Which leads us to the following question: are the really high DIN settings on some factory bindings there to help some guys compensate for something?
I thought that had to do with ski width and stiffness depending on which side of the Mississippi you live/ski on.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
When I used to work in a shop, the only clamps we ever had issues with were Marker.
That's weird. When I used to tech, Markers always tested dead-on. Granted in the Real World the toes pre-released all over the place.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post
I thought that had to do with ski width and stiffness depending on which side of the Mississippi you live/ski on.
Don't forget length; length is important, too.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
That's weird. When I used to tech, Markers always tested dead-on. Granted in the Real World the toes pre-released all over the place.
There weren't many, but the only ones we ever saw with issues (new, anyway...) were Markers.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Rick View Post
Don't forget length; length is important, too.
"That's what she said."

-Michael Scott
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