New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What's up with Kastle?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
And I thought Stockli was pricey. Pricing skis in the $1,500 - $2,000 range and expecting to get a lot of volume is going to be tough in the current economic climate. There are too many good skis out there right now that can be had for a lot less.
post #2 of 19
The nostalgia factor alone should bring in some people.

Kastle was a great brand back in the day that just seemed to disappear overnight. From what I hear the new skis (albeit wicked expensive) do not disappoint.

Back in the day a friend of mine left some Kastle poles at my parents house, hmmm I'm wondering if I can sell those at an exorbitant price to some Kastle fanatic.
post #3 of 19
Seriously? Without bindings? I thought the 98 and 108 (or whatever the widest is) looked like really nice skis, but I wouldn't have expected to see more than $800-900 MSRP tops. Good luck with that, hope they did a low volume run or maybe we can snag them on tramdock next spring for $500.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post
And I thought Stockli was pricey. Pricing skis in the $1,500 - $2,000 range
You must be in Canada.
post #5 of 19
Use to own a pair of Kastle RX-12's back in the day. Nice ski overall. According to the reviews in rags the new Kastle's are very good skis overall.

I don't put to much value in MSRP prices in the ski industry. Equipment is marked up so much and then have huge discounts so its pretty tough to gauge exactly what the market is baring for the new Kastle skis since its quite limited in North America.
post #6 of 19
The "Hollowtech" or whatever they were called Kastle skis had a reputation for being one of the most atrocious ski ever made (they had no mass and were deflected like crazy). It looks like they are reviving that design, which makes me skeptical. I do still own a pair of pencil Kastle skis in 200, so I have no bias against the brand.

Alex
post #7 of 19
I was speaking to a ski shop owner recently about the Kastle 78 and he said that they are probably the best ski out there depending on what your needs are. I live on the east coast of Canada. He described it as being a very smooth and silky ride that you do not need to push, it does everything that you want it to do for you. The price point was $1400 CDN.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
The "Hollowtech" or whatever they were called Kastle skis had a reputation for being one of the most atrocious ski ever made (they had no mass and were deflected like crazy). It looks like they are reviving that design, which makes me skeptical. I do still own a pair of pencil Kastle skis in 200, so I have no bias against the brand.

Alex
Yes they were up there with some of the worst skis ever, the now ones are nothing like them, more like their old race skis..except wiiide.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
The "Hollowtech" or whatever they were called Kastle skis had a reputation for being one of the most atrocious ski ever made (they had no mass and were deflected like crazy). It looks like they are reviving that design, which makes me skeptical. I do still own a pair of pencil Kastle skis in 200, so I have no bias against the brand. Alex
Well, the reviews - here, in the mags, Realskiers, other web sites, TGR, everywhere I know, have been unusually strong. Unlikely everyone including our very own Dawgcatching would think so highly of them if they were atrocious.

Incidentally, as far as mass, the 178 MX88 weighs 2098 g/ski, which is more than the 175 iM88, and getting close to the 178 Stockli Scot Schmidt Pro. Not exactly light or flimsy group.
post #10 of 19
Those Kastle skis were very, very good. As a group, each ski I tried from them was MONEY, in more ways that one. $1500 is alot of $ for a pair of skis, no doubt about it, but I think that they are delivering real performance that, for some people, may be worth the investment. Exceptionally smooth, yet extremely powerful with a very even and predictable flex and forgiving nature. And, as stable as anything else in it's given length. Not that my father-in-law has ever let me drive his 507hp, $115k Mercedes CLS63 AMG, but if he did, I bet it would handle and have power similar to one of the new Kastle skis.

If I had to sum it up: each of the Kastle models probably has 1 or 2 competitors that are as good. Head might have a ski that rivals Kastle Model X, Volkl a ski that rivals Kastle Model Y and so on. But, no company except Kastle has as nice of a lineup: each ski is a home run.

Now, whether a pair of skis is worth $1500 is another matter. You could spend 1/2 of that and get nearly the same performance, and have money left over for a ski trip. It is probably the same as in any other sport: is a $8000 bicycle really much better than a $4000 bicycle, or a $50,000 stereo better than a $20,000 stereo? Yes, but marginally, and it would take high level cyclist or an ex-musician to really appreciate the level of performance each of those top-end items bring to the table. Just as if you are a skier and a hack, you will be a hack on any ski. Money is better spent on lessons and time on the snow for a hack (or most anyone). The point of diminishing returns has been passed when you reach those upper price point levels, and value becomes pretty subjective.

If you had $1500 burning a hole in your pocket, you could do a whole lot worse than a pair of Kastles. Alternatively, you could get a sweet pair of basically-custom boots and alignment that would do much more for your skiing than any pair of skis every would.

Then again, who am I to tell people how to spend their money?
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
The "Hollowtech" or whatever they were called ....
Sure it was Hollowtech? Isn't that a Shimano trademark? Cranks i believe...
post #12 of 19
I have the full line of Kastle's, well, everything but the 108, none are priced over $1000 flat.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
I have the full line of Kastle's, well, everything but the 108, none are priced over $1000 flat.
They dropped their pricing then, from what I saw last spring. MAP was pushing $1400 or more.
post #14 of 19

Old/New Kastle

2 questions:

1. I always thought that Nordica bought Kastle and at some point renamed it Nordica. So the Nordica skis nowdays are designed and made by Kastle (that old Kastle). Now it seems that either there is a completely new Kastle that is just using an old defunct name, or Nordica cleverly decided to split the brand to introduce a luxury high-performance ski (a-la Lexus/Toyota arrangement).

2. I can understand rave reviews on the emotional level, but what is the technical design behind this excitement (i..e what did they do differently and what did they do right to make such a high-reviewed set of skis)?

Alex
post #15 of 19
So long as you deliver the goods, which by all accounts Kastle has, there's always a market for high-end.

The best-selling properties today at Vail and Beaver Creek are ultra-lux units going for $ millions. Meantime, sub-$ million property sales have tanked.

Some lifestyles don't alter with stock market fluctuations. They've got money, and want the best.
post #16 of 19
http://www.kaestle-ski.com/Hollowtech.48.1.html

Pretty self explanatory and they look pretty good in the flesh - not enough snow here yet so none of the shops are letting their demo's out.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post
(i..e what did they do differently and what did they do right to make such a high-reviewed set of skis)Alex
Suggest you take a look at their website. Nothing startling, skis appear to be built like GS race skis (wood sandwich, metal) with extra damping and the cutout tips.

The pair sitting against my wall indicate higher exterior quality control than I have ever seen on a ski, and I've owned most brands, including several Stocklis. No miniscule variation in the topsheet or irregularities along the edge or at the tip or tail. If the insides have that attention to detail, well, sometimes you do get what you pay for. Here's hoping...

Oh, and for those who are interested, strongly recommend talking to Whiteroom, who sold me these. Standup guy, solid ski intelligence.
post #18 of 19
I skied the 88mm underfoot Kastle today. Just one run when I swapped with a friend who was demoing them.

Kind of an unfair comparison because the only skiable snow we have at JH is hard, smooth, and fast. I was on my new Head WC iSpeeds and that ski is much better suited to the conditions than an 88mm midfat.

Also, I really think something was goofy with the tune on one of the skis because the left one felt very weird (even when I switched over and made it the right one). The right one skied very nicely, however. Overall, though, nothing about that ski made me want to run right out and try another pair in the line.

The ski I'm seeing a lot of in these early-season conditions is the Rossi CX80. I made a few turns on it the other day and thought it was nice.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
The ski I'm seeing a lot of in these early-season conditions is the Rossi CX80. I made a few turns on it the other day and thought it was nice.
CX80 is Rossi's new star. It's getting good buzz here in CO.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion