EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How is the term "Powder" defined?
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How is the term "Powder" defined?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I ran into this bit of hyperbole on Whistler's website....when I was growing up, even in Soggy Seattle, we had a very different definition of "powder snow"!


post #2 of 19
Powder is defined as heaven on earth.
~Skierboy
post #3 of 19
Soft and dry stuff that falls through your hands, duh. Doesn't exist here in the East coast, tad too humid for it.
post #4 of 19
Powder exists in the East! When you turn you can hear it! If you can’t hear it it’s not East Coast Powder!


You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing!
post #5 of 19
Powder exists in the East! When you turn you can hear it! If you can’t hear it it’s not East Coast Powder!


You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing!
post #6 of 19
The definition is flexible if you work for a ski area and are responsible for the daily snow report.
post #7 of 19
Powder is synonomous with all snow in Utah. On the Pacific Coast it is any snow you can't wring dripping water out of. On the East coast it is any snow which isn't clear and can't be seen through.
post #8 of 19
Well, in my opinion, powder snow is the kind of snow that is not easy to make a hard snowball...

A powder day could be at least 5" of fresh snow over a solid base.

Am I being to modest?
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiago View Post
Well, in my opinion, powder snow is the kind of snow that is not easy to make a hard snowball...

A powder day could be at least 5" of fresh snow over a solid base.

Am I being to modest?
In baker probably but in the front range thats probably pretty close. I would round it up to a half a foot and call it good.
post #10 of 19
Heh, I don't know that I've ever actually seen "ice" on a snow report, except for in the key.
post #11 of 19
I've never actually seen ice on a ski hill.

It's not ice until it's clear enough to see a fish through it.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

It's not ice until it's clear enough to see a fish through it.
Maybe you can't see fish through it, but in the northeast you can see the ground three feet below in it. Oh, and it's still called "packed powder".
post #13 of 19
Powder only falls in Utah, at least that is what the License plates say.
post #14 of 19
powder to me is freshly fallen snow as well. whether its quality is up to the status of "powder" is up to the snoody skier skiing it.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Maybe you can't see fish through it, but in the northeast you can see the ground three feet below in it.
That's not ice. It's "loud powder".
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Heh, I don't know that I've ever actually seen "ice" on a snow report, except for in the key.
First time I went skiing, I went up to Snowshoe for several days. When I got up for what was to be the last day, there was some really bad freezing rain going on. I'd bet close to an inch of glare ice. So I just left.

I did look at the snow report online that evening to see what was said. I don't know what the official surface was listed at, I'd guess "frozen granular," but in the discussion part, the quote was something like "We received considerable frozen rain overnight. The hill is almost deserted; those out there must really want to ski. If you go out on the slopes, use extreme caution."

I thought that was an interesting and honest report.
post #17 of 19
http://www.7springs.com/page/skirepo...ow_Report.html seven srpings really doesnt sugarcoat id say frozen areas is damn close to ice.
post #18 of 19
Back in the 80s a ski magazine gave the definition of powder by water content of the snow that fell. As more ski areas decided to have (powder) the definition changed to almost anything that fell from the sky except rain, and sometimes in the east that was called powder, especially just before the weekend, and we should never get into a discussion about eastern (packed powder)
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mooddude View Post
Powder only falls in Utah, at least that is what the License plates say.
The license plates say it for a reason, it's true.
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