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Can you tell from the worn pattern on my ski edges?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Just checked my ski, the only worn edges are the bulging/rising parts on both end of my ski, the middle section are sharp like new.

Is that normal? Or my skill is flawed, like too much braking?

Thanks.
post #2 of 16
They need a base grind. It can be normal wear, too agressive wax scrapping, or as a result of regular curing of the resins and adhesives.
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoever View Post
Just checked my ski, the only worn edges are the bulging/rising parts on both end of my ski, the middle section are sharp like new.

Is that normal? Or my skill is flawed, like too much braking?

Thanks.
If I understand what you're saying -- that the metal edges are dull at the tip and tail -- then it's probably due to the way the skis were tuned. It's often standard practice to dull the tips and tails after the edges are sharpened, to prevent the tips and tails from feeling grabby. I can't imagine any reason why this pattern would develop from skiing itself.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks. I mean only the metal edges, the rest are in good shape.

I only used it for about 5 days at most, at this rate, there would be no metal left by the end of the season. Does high-end expensive skis use harder metals? Or maybe it mostly due to poor skills
post #5 of 16
They were tuned like that.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
If I understand what you're saying -- that the metal edges are dull at the tip and tail -- then it's probably due to the way the skis were tuned. It's often standard practice to dull the tips and tails after the edges are sharpened, to prevent the tips and tails from feeling grabby. I can't imagine any reason why this pattern would develop from skiing itself.
Yes, exactly. You could be right, I never check the edges on both end before until yesterday. I was thinking with only 5 days on them, the metal could all gone by the end of the season.

Even though it was a cheap Budweiser ski, it should last longer than that
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone, a sigh of relief
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
They need a base grind. It can be normal wear, too agressive wax scrapping, or as a result of regular curing of the resins and adhesives.
I misunderstood.

Scratch the above.

The front and rear ends of the edges are sometimes detuned to avoid grabbiness. This is common practice, nothing wrong.
post #9 of 16
I feel that de-tuning the tips and tails of modern skis is poor practice. We all did that back in the days of pencil skis, but modern skis need to grip the snow there.

My suggestion is to sharpen the skis all the way up & around the tips & tails. That's how I like my skis. Carry a pocket grindstone to dull them as much as wanted during the day if you really feel the need.
post #10 of 16
I agree, SSG (in this case ).

I never understood "detuning" tips and tails, even on the old straight skis. I "unlearned" that from a Dynastar World Cup tech in the late1970's--he taught us to bevel the tip and tail base edge, by holding a file on the ends to cause a slight bow, but to never, ever just detune ("dull") them.

In any case, like the others, I suspect that the problem for Whoever (Whomever?) is that the skis were detuned. It's still an all-too--common practice among ski shops everywhere!

Best regards,
Bob
post #11 of 16
Properly tuned skis will be sharp at the tips long after the tail and underfoot region have dulled. Which makes sense, as the tips are very lightly loaded.
post #12 of 16
It's a very common problem with getting skis tuned by shops.

They just assume you can't ski well enough to use sharp edges near your tips and tails and ruin the skis performance.

Get some files and stones and the right guide for your skis and discover what they can really do.
post #13 of 16
I honestly think it depends on the type of ski. I keep the tips and tails of my carver skis sharp, but most of my other skis benefit from some detuning (I always ski them first before deciding).
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
I honestly think it depends on the type of ski. I keep the tips and tails of my carver skis sharp, but most of my other skis benefit from some detuning (I always ski them first before deciding).
Next time try BB's idea of beveling tips & tails. I used to love a progressive bevel on my straight skis for soft snow. Just like he said I would just bow the file more at the tips & tails. It was all done by feel, no stinkin' file guides.
JF
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks, learned a lot. A beginner like me probably can't tell either way. I'm just glad that I didn't worn out my ski in one season.

Mr. Barnes, will there be Encyclopedia of Skiing 4th edition? I have been holding off purchase the current one for a while. It was high on your priority list since last time DOW was at 8,000
post #16 of 16
Thanks for asking! I'm still working on it, but stay tuned here at EpicSki for the upcoming online, multimedia version, with video and animated clips wherever possible to illustrate many terms.

Lots of work to do, but please stay tuned!

Best regards,
Bob
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