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Aussie looking for review of technique (updated video uploaded_previous links broken)

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

Thanks for your comments; all very useful. SSG, awesome comments mate - thanks a million. Being in the back seat has always been an issue. At least 2 instructors have made me unbuckle my boots in an attempt to fix the problem. Things have definitely improved though, and I am generally trying to get forward – although often my desire to go fast throws me back. Kneale, I definitely use the outside ski to initiate turns; in fact I often lift the inside ski to accommodate the weight transfer. Nevertheless, I will keep your comments and work on improving next time I ski.


I typically only ski around 1 week per year, which makes it hard to improve. I usually spend the first day, day and a half just getting back to where I left off. That said, however, that does leave a little bit of time to work on improving my skills (3-4 days each year). Most of my skiing ability came about through working a season (30-40 days) in 1998. During this time I went from skiing skidding turns to ‘half decent’ carved turns. However, I must admit that I had very little instruction over this time and learnt primarily from watching other more advanced skiers. Since this time I have lived over 1,500 miles from the nearest ski field, so time on the hill is indeed precious.

I’ve started a new thread as I have now improved the quality of the footage from the previous thread, and in doing so have broken the original links. I have also added a third video – this one providing a better view of my skis than one of the previous ‘grabs’. The key to the video links is as follows: (1) slow carving turns on gentle beginner run; (2) faster medium turns on intermediate run and (3) jumping off small lip and then faster shorter turns.

(1)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaCKJY-3c34

(2)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeR_OEPzduU

(3)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dpuk842K5Ts

I have always wondered what would have happened if I didn’t go back to Uni and instead pursued a career in skiing; I nearly went to Whistler in 2009 to pursue ski instructing.

Can any examiners out there tell me if I would pass the initial ‘hiring clinic’ phase (as it is known is Australia)?? Hiring clinic is the intensive training and instructor recruitment clinic held every year at Australian resorts. Skiers who pass this phase typically move on to full or part time work teaching beginners, with the option of completing level 1 at a later date.

With best regards,
post #2 of 19
Hi Pickle. A few observations. It's late, and I'm bushed, so please excuse the brevity. Throw questions back at me if anythings not clear.

- Too much outside knee angulation. It's a weak position,,, it limits how high you can put your ski on edge,,, it can lead to the intro of steering in carved turns.

- You have some rotation going on at the end of the turn. Watch your outside arm/hand drive forward and across your body at the end of your turns. That too can lead to washy carving, as it makes the tails of your skis skid out to the side.

- Your hips are not moving inside your feet, they're staying right above your feet. To get rid of the knee angulation you need to get some horizontal hip separation from your feet.

- Lacking balance skills can be a cause of hips over feet. Find some balance drills to practice.

- Hands on hips as you ski can help, as a rotation control drill

- Hands on knees can focus your attention there, and help you shed the A frame

- The schlopy drill can help with the rotation,,,, and help move the hip inside your feet.

- Check the tracks you're leaving in the snow. Strive for super clean,,, arc to arc. Especially through the transition. No pivoiting or drift before the carve starts.

- Vary your turn shape. I'd like to see you make complete turns, so that you finish 90 degrees to the falline. It will help you build your skills. Right now your barely doing 45's.
post #3 of 19
I watched the 3rd link. Would you pass the hiring clinic in Oz? Yes, probably. Your technique and stance are both quite poor, but you look flashy and smooth and that counts for a lot. They're looking for that look, plus "personality".

Legs: locked and not working. You swing the tails of the skis out to achieve some braking through the last half of each turn, and this move is driven from the hips. Knees and ankles are bent, and they stay that way, there's no progessive flexing/extending through the turn. However, there's plenty to work with there, a decent trainer could work with that and get some real improvement quickly, as you look athletic.

Hands and arms: hanging down, that's going to help get you into the back seat every time. Trainer will help you work out what to do with those limbs, and how they can help the body.

Turns: very smooth and fluid, again, a decent trainer will be able to work with this to improve it. Each turn is the beginning of a turn, and then a swing and push of the tails to slow the skis down before the next turn. Poor technique, but it looks quite athletic. You'll learn how to keep the hips in the middle, and turn the legs underneath them.

Your undoing will be anything long and steep, difficult snow, and bumps, I should imagine. But I'd expect you to pass the hiring clinic, no problems. It's not that hard, to be honest.
post #4 of 19

A different point of view

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Cucumber View Post
I am generally trying to get forward – although often my desire to go fast throws me back. Kneale, I definitely use the outside ski to initiate turns; in fact I often lift the inside ski to accommodate the weight transfer. Nevertheless, I will keep your comments and work on improving next time I ski.
Like motorbiking there is a progression from high-speed and straight ahead acceleration to high g-forces in lateral acceleration.

I can relate having learned at first by emulating good skiers, and applying my knowledge of physics to the ski. I still love to ski fast, but have spent the last few years mostly concentrating on smaller turns.



First of all let me qualify what I'm about to say by telling you that I am not a ski instructor, and have no training as such in any system, just a lot of degrees in engineering.

It looks to me like you have sufficient skills, just one or two problems that need to be addressed.

The way I approach skiing is all at the ski. Whereas some instructors will tell you to do certain things with your body, I only have one such tip I picked up from them that I'll get to later. My skiing became a lot easier and less mysterious when I understood how a ski worked. So I'll start there and get the mechanics working, then end with a few tips.

The ski has an hourglass shape, wider at the tip and tail than at the waist. When you tip a ski over on a flat surface, the tip and tail will touch and the middle will be lifted off the surface. To get the entire edge touching the flat surface you have to push it down, and when it is pushed down it will "decamber" and end up touching the entire surface, but it will be touching the surface in a curve. The more you tip it, the more curved will be that contact. When you arc a turn on your skis, you are riding that curved edge. For best results you have to think of tipping your skis as the main means of initiating and changing the shape of your turns. You are simply riding your curved edges and changing the shape of those curved edges by tipping to different angles (Graduate course includes other means of altering the shape of the ski at the expense of edge-snow harmony).

You have an entire ski to work with. If you put too much weight on the tips or tails the other end might not have enough weight to hold it pressed down and you will lose the edge at the other end. OR you will have more force than the edge can hold where you apply the weight and the edge won't hold there. It depends on how much is being asked of the edge, conditions at the edge, and the amount of sideways and downwards force available and called for (yes it's complicated). All you have to work on for now is keeping your weight centered on the ski as a first step, and later moving it fore and aft for more dynamic demanding conditions.

It appears you have too much weight on your tails and not enough on the tips, causing the front edge of your skis not to grip as well and the tails to wash out a little when the turn forces build up. You have to feel when the front of your skis are not gripping and press them into the snow. Instructors have a few tricks to get you to do this: "get forward as though you were stepping up to the urinal", "press on the tongue of the boot", and "pull your feet back". I never liked the tongue of the boot thing, as to me it's better to think of pressing on the snow with the ski; I don't need to tell you to press on the handle of a sword if I want you to push the sword tip into something. The pull back the feet really helps a lot of people; somehow moving the feet behind the body is easier for them to think of than moving the body ahead of the feet. To me it's always been just a matter of keeping pressure where I wanted it on the ski, while being aware that you don't want to do that by leaning forward at the waist and compensate by sticking your but out behind you.

One exercise to help with weight distribution is the 1000 steps. Just ski down the mountain making turns while stepping, lifting each foot in turn for a second or so and setting it down while lifting the other up. The key here is to concentrate on having an even fore-aft weight distribution on the ski and foot as you put the foot down. You should "feel" the weight between your ball and heel, and adjust as needed.

Now about those turns, they seem to be working ok so long as there is not a lot of force required. Once the turn develops to the point that your centre of mass needs to be accelerated things start to get a little more difficult. You currently deal with that by either ending the turn and transitioning to the next turn or you have the tails wash. It may look like your doing it to brake, but I think you would rather not lose the speed. Understanding tipping will help; you need to get a bigger tipping angle on those skis for the edge to hold with more force.

The best tool for the job is a SL ski, either race or one level below race (like my Fischer WC SC). This will allow you to make many more turns per run. The downside is that they won't arc high-speed big radius turns; they will be able to make high speed big radius turns, just not arc them.

Work on tipping your skis and keeping them tipped until your are almost going up hill. Start out at slower speeds, say 15 to 20 mph, making turns almost pointing uphill will keep your speed down to that easily enough. If you find yourself in steep bumps, tipping so far that the edge can't hold an arc that tight and even further will kill tons of speed and allow you to get back to arcing those tight turns. When you find yourself able to tip your skis to a really big angle and hold the carve, you can up the speed and try to show the bases to the sky on the uphill side of the run.

Try to tip and keep tipping more and more until you are at the apex, then decrease the amount of tipping.

As to lifting the inside leg to enhance weight transfer. I sometimes am forced to ski the outside ski alone when making SL turns at slow speeds on my SG skis. Having an appropriatly stiff ski for your weight speed and turn shape you shouldn't need to do that, but you may find suddenly collapsing the old outside ski new inside ski leg at the end of the turn lets your cm come across the skis and changes the tipping angle for a really fun cross-under transition. Try it after you have a little experience in more complete tight turns (ending 90 degrees to fall line); it's a blast.

I hope you find this tome helpful.
post #5 of 19
Let the "pigs" out and dare to move on skis and crank those boots down. Too much park and ride, still a bit static. The good thing is that you have already done a nice job on your stance, your moves are pretty fluent, but simply not pronounced enough. Other minor flaws should be fixed easy. I am not sure about the australian Ski Instructor Exam, but it may not be enough yet to pass the austrian entrance exam. To pass the on snow test you really have to be on top of the game.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Cucumber View Post
Hi all,

Thanks for your comments; all very useful. SSG, awesome comments mate - thanks a million. Being in the back seat has always been an issue. At least 2 instructors have made me unbuckle my boots in an attempt to fix the problem. Things have definitely improved though, and I am generally trying to get forward – although often my desire to go fast throws me back. Kneale, I definitely use the outside ski to initiate turns; in fact I often lift the inside ski to accommodate the weight transfer. Nevertheless, I will keep your comments and work on improving next time I ski.


I typically only ski around 1 week per year, which makes it hard to improve. I usually spend the first day, day and a half just getting back to where I left off. That said, however, that does leave a little bit of time to work on improving my skills (3-4 days each year). Most of my skiing ability came about through working a season (30-40 days) in 1998. During this time I went from skiing skidding turns to ‘half decent’ carved turns. However, I must admit that I had very little instruction over this time and learnt primarily from watching other more advanced skiers. Since this time I have lived over 1,500 miles from the nearest ski field, so time on the hill is indeed precious.

I’ve started a new thread as I have now improved the quality of the footage from the previous thread, and in doing so have broken the original links. I have also added a third video – this one providing a better view of my skis than one of the previous ‘grabs’. The key to the video links is as follows: (1) slow carving turns on gentle beginner run; (2) faster medium turns on intermediate run and (3) jumping off small lip and then faster shorter turns.

(1) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaCKJY-3c34

(2) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeR_OEPzduU

(3) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dpuk842K5Ts

I have always wondered what would have happened if I didn’t go back to Uni and instead pursued a career in skiing; I nearly went to Whistler in 2009 to pursue ski instructing.

Can any examiners out there tell me if I would pass the initial ‘hiring clinic’ phase (as it is known is Australia)?? Hiring clinic is the intensive training and instructor recruitment clinic held every year at Australian resorts. Skiers who pass this phase typically move on to full or part time work teaching beginners, with the option of completing level 1 at a later date.

With best regards,
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Thankyou everyone for your comments. It is really great to finally get some technical pointers. I had a 'not-so-good' experience this year with a European instructor who too me and a mate out for a private lesson. Instead of giving me the technical instruction that I wanted (as you have), he insisted that I was already a good skiier (LOL) and that I should just get out there an have fun. The only thing he made me work on was completing my turns (so that my skis were perpenducular to the fall-line) and focussing my eyes on where I wanted to turn.

Thanks to the physics/engineering guy for a really interesting perspective. Everyone else made a lot of sense as well. Many of you talked about a certain amount of 'pivot' toward the end of my turns and the fact that I was using sideways movement, (rather than a clean carving across the hill) to wash off speed. To me, the 'sideways pivot and slide' is more obvious in video 3 (jump and short turns), but not so much in video 1 and 2. Video 1 and 2 are of me skiing on very gentle slopes trying my best to execute 'perfect' turns, so its interesting that you are finding flaws even in these examples - interesting, but fair at the same time. Thankyou. If I was to sit an exam and put on my best skiing, video 1 is how I would do it - up until now that is :-)

In any case, it appears I have plenty of things to work on. Maybe I should get another job in the mountains. If anyone knows of any good environmental management jobs going in the mountains (particularly to do with stream ecology), let me know :-)

Keep the critiques comming (no matter what the effect on my rapidly diminishing ego). I'll print them out and have another read before I go skiing next (July 2009?).
post #7 of 19
Mate, to a technical instructor, all your turns will essentially look the same. You might think that one run you're skiing great, and on another run you are skiing rubbish, but to a decent instructor, it all looks the same. Punters resenting doing ski-offs can never understand that, and are muttering that they have been under-graded because they weren't doing their "best turns".

It sounds to me like the hiring clinic would be great for you, because there's less sales-pitch (euro instructor), more proper training focus with the hard facts you need (and evidently want) to hear. Quite a few people do the hiring clinics just to get that kind of training.

you might enjoy a race program or camp, too, as the race coaches tend to be less about trying to sell you more lessons or stroke their egos, and more about technique and performance.
post #8 of 19
For your ego, you should know that you have a healthy drive for the sport. And that is already being half way there. You should certainly go and become an Instructor but without putting you down, it will be a while. And since you had a bad experience yourself, now you know why it should not be all that easy to become one.
That is unheard of what this guys said. I would fire him, give him one or two Euros for his next lessons.

Good luck.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Cucumber View Post
Thankyou everyone for your comments. It is really great to finally get some technical pointers. I had a 'not-so-good' experience this year with a European instructor who too me and a mate out for a private lesson. Instead of giving me the technical instruction that I wanted (as you have), he insisted that I was already a good skiier (LOL) and that I should just get out there an have fun. The only thing he made me work on was completing my turns (so that my skis were perpenducular to the fall-line) and focussing my eyes on where I wanted to turn.

Thanks to the physics/engineering guy for a really interesting perspective. Everyone else made a lot of sense as well. Many of you talked about a certain amount of 'pivot' toward the end of my turns and the fact that I was using sideways movement, (rather than a clean carving across the hill) to wash off speed. To me, the 'sideways pivot and slide' is more obvious in video 3 (jump and short turns), but not so much in video 1 and 2. Video 1 and 2 are of me skiing on very gentle slopes trying my best to execute 'perfect' turns, so its interesting that you are finding flaws even in these examples - interesting, but fair at the same time. Thankyou. If I was to sit an exam and put on my best skiing, video 1 is how I would do it - up until now that is :-)

In any case, it appears I have plenty of things to work on. Maybe I should get another job in the mountains. If anyone knows of any good environmental management jobs going in the mountains (particularly to do with stream ecology), let me know :-)

Keep the critiques comming (no matter what the effect on my rapidly diminishing ego). I'll print them out and have another read before I go skiing next (July 2009?).
post #9 of 19
Dr Cucumber,

Really great points above. They are on the money.

What would help you the most is paying attention to the transition between the turns. It is rushed, which is why you pick-up the new inside ski and then have to reposition it. It needs to be flattened before you start engaging your edges in the new turn. This will allow your core to start moving into the turn earlier and eliminate the need to push the tails out to move you into the turn.

RW
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Cucumber View Post
In any case, it appears I have plenty of things to work on. Maybe I should get another job in the mountains. If anyone knows of any good environmental management jobs going in the mountains (particularly to do with stream ecology), let me know :-)
https://www3.ultirecruit.com/ENT1003...65522F7C1FDE95

Not really "in the mountains", but Sacramento is only 2 hours from Squaw . . . (being Australian might not help you, though).
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Gents,

thanks once again. Have been away in Australia's NorthWestern tropics; thus, my late reply.

Some very sound and very reasonable comments there. I'll be sure to take on board your comments in 2009. Maybe I can post new footage on my return....will make for a nice comparison.

Oh, and thanks for the job advertisement. Funnily enough, I could actually apply for that job, and probably go quite well. No too much experience with Salmon/Trout though. Maybe next time.

Dr Cuc
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

Have uploaded a short clip of me skiing in 2009 (Mt Hotham, Australia). Worked a fair bit on improving my technique following comments received on this forum previously (based on 2008 footage -see top of thread). Did a few lessons with a level 2 Canadian qualified instructor. He made a good observation on my technique. He said the reason I was getting into the back seat was that I was literally thrusting my skis forward on the turn transition. Apparently this is getting the middle of the skis too far forward. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xgiFSTPi6k

See what you think (that's me in the yellow jacket)?

BTW I plan to attend a 2 week intensive training session in Canada next year. I will then attempt to pass the CSIA Level 1 exam; so I welcome any feedback you may have (good or bad).
post #13 of 19
Hey DrC, some really nice improvements! 
Alot smoother with more angulation and movement.  You have dialed down the rotary and dialed up the edging!  Keep going!

I'm just getting into this Epicski stuff and am looking to learn alot as well.  I am currently a Level 2 PSIA instructor with designs on trying to test against the Level 3 bar this year. 

So, I am trying to provide you with some movement analysis and improvement areas while seeking my own feedback as an instructor (and possibly post my skiing here as well for the same reasons you did).  These guys are good as you know - candid, honest, brutal, controversial, overwhelming, insightful, and above all, knowledgeable.  Yes, even complimentary at times, but for sure, it is everything anyone who wants to understand their skiing and make improvements needs to hear.  Pablum is served elswhere.

Anyway, here is what I see:
1. You are still turning from your hips.  Certainly not as much as you were however.
2. You still look to be a bit over your heels.  The video doesn't show a side shot to really tell.
3. You are dropping your inside hand (and both hands are down).  Notice you could not swing your pole forward because it hit the snow on your outside hand!
4. Mild edge set pop up at end of turn to initiate new turn.
5. Your feet open and close during a turn.

So, some suggestions:
1. Ski with your feet. Focus on tipping your feet first.  Try doing some railed railroad tracks on beginner hill runout.  Keep feet hip to shoulder width apart and try to tip your inside ski first. Flex into cuff at 2 o'clock to go right and 10 o'clock to go left.  Notice the patience required to wait for the turn to happen when you change edges.  Take it to a gentle green slope and start with gentle close to the fall line turns then as your speed increases, begin to belly out the turns more. 

2. Tuck your heels under you more to get your CoM over mid to ball of foot.  One of the things I think about is pulling back the soon to be inside foot as I tip it to flaten it and tip it into the new turn. 

3. Quiet the upper body.  Try making some turns (with feet apart) and not let your body move up or down - keep it level.  You will have to retract your legs at the transition to do this and extend at the apex.  Almost the opposite of what you are doing now.  Exaggerate it, play with it.  Try some tuck turns too.

4. Get your hands up and in front of you.  This will help keep the balance forward.  Per Ultimate Skiing book, make a loop with 5ft. string, put it over your wrists and ski trying to keep it taught.  I just made one for myself and will be trying that as soon as our local hill gets some snow.

In general, try making some runs with your feet shoulder width apart.  Not because that's where I want you but some pretty good learning comes out there, particularly if you crank em over.

Most of your videos have been on easy (green) runs with incomplete turns.  Would love to see you on blues or groomed blacks making turns across the hill more.  Also, it would be helpful if the video showed you from the side and back as well.

Love your enthusiam for improvement!  Keep it up.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks very much Snowhawk, some great pointers there. It never ceases to amaze me how much great feedback you get on this site. Cumulatively speaking, the feedback must be worth hundreds of $ (if not thousands of $) in private lessons. This year I printed out the entire thread and read it on the plane on the way. Certainly gives me plenty to think about when I finally arrive at my favourite hillm (some 2000 miles from my home).

Just one question; I am still learning the technical jargon. What do you mean by 'mild edge set pop up'?

Thanks again.

P.S. Would I need much improvement to pass level 1 (PSIA or CSIA), or am I already there???
post #15 of 19
 Watching the three videos I could see an improvement from the first to the last. 

There are three primary areas I like to look at:
- stance
- ability to turn the feet underneath a stable upper body
- ability to balance on the outside ski


Your stance is biased aft.  Work on moving your hips forward at initiation and pressuring the shovels of your skis at the top of your turns.  It is important to find your balanced stance and recenter every time you change edges so that you can begin the turns in balance with slight pressure forward with the shins pressing against the boot tongues and weight shifted toward the first met head and inside ankle.  A good drill to feel what this sensation feels like is to make herring bone steps up a slight hill.  This places the hips ahead of the feet and pressure on the inside edges.  This is the offensive position you should seek before the skis get to the fall line.

Your ability to turn your feet beneath a stable torso needs work.  What I saw was a ski design turn where you simply tipped the ski on edge and rode what it gave you.  Practice pivot slips then refine them with progressively more edge angle to add shape.  Try making turns with just enough edge to minimize skidding yet not lock the ski on an edge.  Accurately steering your skis around an arc takes much more skill than simply tipping and riding the sidecut.

Your ability to balance on the outside ski will improve with practice.  You must balance both on the fore/aft plane (sagital) and the lateral plane (frontal) and transverse plane simultaneously to have the most positive effect over your skis.  Practice balancing on one ski only, first in traverses to find your fore/aft balance (hint: bend your ankle) then progress into uphill christies driving forward to get the shovel to bite and create a steering angle.  Then start into a steep traverse and extend your hips forward and toward the turn apex off the uphill ski to take it all the way around the turn.  Then link them.  Play with beginning the turn on the ball of your foot then move to the arch in the fall line and finish by pushing the outside foot forward to pressure the heel.

Focus on these three areas with various drills and exercises and watch your skiing progress!  You are off to a good start without any really negative movement patterns to break.  Great potential! 
post #16 of 19
DC, yeah those technical terms will get you.
It looks like you are extending your legs at transition so your upper body is "popping up".  This movement has the affect of creating s small platform for you to initiate your turns from with rotary.  This is different than rolling your skis off their edges to flatten the skis in transition and then continue rolling them up onto their opposite edges.  In order to do that, you have to move your CoM across your skis downhill and into the upcoming turn and not upward.
The carving excersises will help you get the feel for this.  The skiing with a quiet upper body (no up down or twisting) and skis shoulder width apart really requires you to move your CoM side to side (or your feet moving across under you depending on your perspective) in order to get the skis on edge.  Ditto making turns in a tuck.
What really got it for me was seeing a guy and his son go by one day with their hips about 1 ft off the snow in a railed carve.  So I tried it and found I had to really drop my hips into the turn and had to cross over a LONG way to the other side for the next turn.  I didn't have time to go up and over - it was over or the trees! 
Once you start doing these, be warned - they are very addictive!

Oh, BTW, if you have not already done so, take a peek at the WIKI The Perfect Turn by Bob Barnes.  It changes the way you think about turns!

Cheers and have some great skiing!
post #17 of 19
DrC, forgot some other feedback.
I am not a PSIA Examiner but I am PSIA Level II.  I have not seen you ski in real life , teach or perform any exam manuevers so anything could happen in an exam.

That said, IMHO your skiing is better than many Level I's I have seen. 
Prepare by getting the Alpine books from PSIA so you are aware of the technology, terminology and approach from PSIA.  No idea what is available for CSIA.

Level I IMO is about evaluating your ability to become a ski instructor.  Your manner, approach, communication, teaching and people skills.  And yes, you need to be able to ski some.  Nail the basic manuevers - wedge turns, wedge christies, open parallel, side slips....
If you get a chance, the Rocky Mountain Division has an excellent video on all of this for all three Levels.  While you're there, get Barnes' Encyclopedia of Skiing.  This should be required reading for all Ski Instructors - part of your dues.

On another note, my daughter is going your direction over the holidays - she has a boyfriend in New Zealand.  So your traveling 2000 miles to your favorite resort - where?
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your comments and advice. Really looking forward to putting everything into practice now.

Snowhawk, appreciate your comments . My bro and I (and families) are planning to head to Queenstown, New Zealand in August/September next year. Otherwise we ski at our 'local' ski hill, Mt Hotham, 3.5 hrs drive from Melbourne, Victoria . Although nothing like what you guys ski, Hotham is a great little resort with plenty of nice and interesting terrain (see image below). Plenty of Canadian, US and European instructors work at Hotham during the northern summer.

I bet many of you would never guess that image was taken in SE Australia (temps get to ~115 degrees just 3 hours drive away in summer).

Mt Hotham, Victoria, Australia 
post #19 of 19
Looks great!  Would love to get down there someday.  Both the kids have been to both NZ and Aus.  My dream is to get to both via sailboat and then continue on.

Anyway, when you get a chance, get some more vids of your skiing on some tougher stuff.  You're improving a bunch each year!
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