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New Quiver For Groomers - Making Sense?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Allright, my question may sound stupid to some of you rad groomer kings/queens but here's my point. I rarely ski groomers except when spending time on the slopes with the family. Even then I try to lure them towards the fresh stuff and my last hard pack dedicated purchase was 8 years or so ago.

Looking around I noticed plenty of skis with wider shovels and a good amount of sidecut like the Völkl AC40/50, Blizzard Titan Cronos ect. as all-mountain weapons. OTOH I still got an '05 vintage Head Mojo 90 (125-90-114) in a 186 with very similar dim. in the quiver except for some mm underfoot and the full twin, leaving construction aside. They're still in good shape since else they don't see too much love.

So with the evolution over the three years is it justified to add a new groomer railer to the quiver or should I just keep on with the Mojos as the dedicated quiver ski?
Thx
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowHog View Post
Allright, my question may sound stupid to some of you rad groomer kings/queens but here's my point. I rarely ski groomers except when spending time on the slopes with the family. Even then I try to lure them towards the fresh stuff and my last hard pack dedicated purchase was 8 years or so ago.

Looking around I noticed plenty of skis with wider shovels and a good amount of sidecut like the Völkl AC40/50, Blizzard Titan Cronos ect. as all-mountain weapons. OTOH I still got an '05 vintage Head Mojo 90 (125-90-114) in a 186 with very similar dim. in the quiver except for some mm underfoot and the full twin, leaving construction aside. They're still in good shape since else they don't see too much love.

So with the evolution over the three years is it justified to add a new groomer railer to the quiver or should I just keep on with the Mojos as the dedicated quiver ski?
Thx
I guess it depends on how much time you are actually going to spend on groomers, but if you are going to ski there anyway, it wouldn't hurt to have something that works well.

I think you would be shocked how fun groomers can be from time to time if you have a high performance carver or race ski.

Those Mojos are tweeners... not great on or off the groomed. Especially on.
post #3 of 13
G.S. Skis are bountiful on Ski-bay. For usually $100.00 or so, you can get a sweet $1000.00 race ski to play around with for those groomer days.
post #4 of 13
I have Gots and Mojo 90s, and if you can get some race carvers or citizen GS skis for cheap (say $100), then do it. It costs about $30-50 to demo, so even if you ski them and sell them after 3 days, you've had a chance to demo them at no real loss.

FWIW, I ski Tahoe/Utah/Colorado, and I think the Mojos are fine for skiing with my wife or less adventurous friends. There's usually plenty of fun to be had in the trees or I practice skiing switch and get "credit card air."

In sum, I wouldn't replace the Mojos with the RC, I'd just add the RC to the quiver.
post #5 of 13
If you need to have fun at slower speeds with the family, get a non race stock slalom ski.....ride the g forces of outrageous carves without having to hit the speeds needed to make a GS ski work. They can turn a boring plank into a roller coaster.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thx everyone. Good suggestions, keep 'em coming.

Especially when with the lovely wifey I get to spend more time on groomers than I like to admit. Most of the time at laid back pace since she isn't exactly a dare devil. Somewhat different story when with the kids only while she takes a break. Typical family skiing trip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
I think you would be shocked how fun groomers can be from time to time if you have a high performance carver or race ski.
FWIW I am well aware about the fun of bombing down groomers from time to time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
Those Mojos are tweeners... not great on or off the groomed. Especially on.
Agreed!
post #7 of 13
To my way of thinking, a good complete quiver contains three skis (narrow, medium and wide). The widths will vary according to tastes and conditions but for practical purposes, you have the medium and wide covered. An AC 40/50, or Mag 8.7 would fit into the middle slot but would carry more of a hard snow bias than the Mojo.

I'd agree that a narrower ski than that would put more excitement into a pass down the groomers. I'm not sure that you have to get a race ski to achieve that excitement but they will sure deliver if that's what you get. I would suggest that if you get a race ski, don't get a G.S. model or at least not a FIS GS'er. I think you might find yourself skiing way too fast in order to arc 'em and the family might have trouble keeping you in sight.

SJ
post #8 of 13
I agree with SJ. The race ski, while more fun at speed, won't be suitable at slow speeds with family and friends. You need something at the level of an old RX8 or a regular supershape or similar to be able to arc them into nice shaped carves while skiing at a sedate pace. The Race ski will require more speed than the wife and kids are going to be happy with in order to work properly.
post #9 of 13
When I have kids, I'll be buying citizen SL's.
post #10 of 13
Carvers are a ton of fun, and it is amazing what you can do on a well-tuned carver or pseudo-race ski. Several of my best days where when there wasn't much new snow around and we ended up just ripping groomers all day. People who only ski on new snow days are missing out!

I say get a set, no doubt. I am partial to some of the pseudo GS race skis (like the Elan GSX) and also like the straight-up frontside carver like the Fischer Progressor. There are lots of good choices to choose from, although either of those 2 skis will have you leaving the family behind in about 2 turns. Then again, if you get a carver, you may find yourself skiing groomers a little more often, more than just when you are with the fam....
post #11 of 13
I've found my Head SS's (regular, not speeds) to be a great family ski; easy to ski slowly, but can pick it up when called upon, pretty good in bumps. Conversely, the Cronus works well too; flexible enough to bend into shorter turns and slow down, very nice in bumps, and suitable for a quick foray into soft snow. Carves better than the Mojos, although maybe a touch slower in the trees. Key here is to keep 'em flexible. Get stiff logs and you'll be forever stopping to wait for everyone, which doesn't earn points from either side.
post #12 of 13

3 ski quiver for Cheapskates

Head XP100 177cm, Atomic REX 191cm, and Gotomas in 183(old black with big Buddha). Last couple of seasons in Sierras have been a liitle sparse in snow coverage. I have been learning how to carve the Heads again. They have been way more fun than I remember. That's what a 13m sidecut on fresh groomer can do for you. The Atomic's still just crush the off piste when its old hard Sierra cement. The Goats at the end of last season were a super fun billy goat kind of ski in spring slush. When I hit the inevitable rock I didn't cringe too badly. I told my wife once," That you just can't have one pair of shoes, right? " So now I have three pair of cheap fun shoes. She even has a 2 ski quiver now. Skinny Volkls and fat K2. There is a lot of not so old cheap good skis out there to play with. Indulge, it's too much fun not to.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the input folks.

Guess what is missing most in the quiver would be both a GS race ski and a SL carver with emphasis on the latter first. Only problem is the wifey yelling at me for taking along more than the usual 2-3 quivers.
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