EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Backcountry, Telemark, and Cross Country › BCA Alpine Trekkers or Snow Shoes, casual use?
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BCA Alpine Trekkers or Snow Shoes, casual use?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've been trying to get a feel for this niche (cheap BC), it seems like some people like the Trekkers while others hate them and recommend dedicated bindings. However, it also seems like there is even more dislike of snow shoes. I'm looking for something that is cheap and versatile (as in, I can use it with more than one pair of skis). To me, that means the Alpine Trekkers or Snow shoes.

Any ideas on what I should go for? I'd rather not go the dedicated binding route as I'll have to skimp (used or cheap models) as well as deal with changing the bindings around on my skis. Are either of these options even worth looking into? I'm only really interested in pretty casual, 2-3 mile hikes usually from a lift of some sort which I think affects my options, but I really don't know. Please, help a newbie out!
post #2 of 13
As much as I dislike Trekkers (although I still use them from time to time) I freaking hate snowshoes. I seriously would recommend just postholing before trying snowshoes.
post #3 of 13
A friend of mine just got the trekkers and we took them out on Loveland Pass, CO a couple of weekends ago. He seemed to like them and thought they worked just fine.

I would say if you are going on fairly short tours without any major steeps or obstacles to deal with, the trekkers would be the way to go. But remember you will have to get skins for your skis if going uphill at all, and those can get pretty pricey (150 dollar range).
post #4 of 13
I'd suggest buying used Trekkers and skins on TGR or ebay. No need to blow a bunch of $$$ immediately.
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
I'd suggest buying used Trekkers and skins on TGR or ebay. No need to blow a bunch of $$$ immediately.
That's kinda what I'm leaning towards. I posted over in the WTB area, not sure how much exposure that gets. Any other forums I should be checking out for used gear?
post #6 of 13
Trekkers are a resonable option for short touring provided your alpine boots fit well. They don't flex and you need to rely on unbuckling the top buckle(s). They are not designed for what you will be using them for, and you can develop blisters pretty quickly if you have any problem areas, and that can screw up your downhill skiing for several weeks. If you use them just be sure to check what is happening if you start to get hot spots. Toughing it out for a 1/2 hour can result in some major skin removal.
post #7 of 13
I just saw a web sit selling trekkers for $180 bucks!
Holy Crapes Batman!
Considering that my alpine boot wasn't made for that type of motion, I think I'll just get some cross-country skis and boots.

How many different options are there?
X-country
Telemark
AT (whatever that is)
more?

What's the differrence?

Thing is the hills around my place are small. It would be like climb for 15 minutes ski down for 2 minutes, ski along for 10, up for 10, down for 1 etcetera. you get the picture. I don't want to be fiddling with bindings and removing skins every 10 minutes. I also would prefer not to free-heel down some of the more fun lines.
I remember some of my first skiing was done on old WWII surplus wooden skis with cable bindings and leather boots. You could adjust the cables to hold your heel down by clipping them near the back, or farther forward for x-country type skiing. I don't suppose I could find some of those in the local Sally Anne these days.
post #8 of 13
Some guy's selling a pair of mint Freerides on TGR for $150.


Ghost - I'd go the cheap AT binding/used skins/your alpine boots route. Touring in alpine boots really isn't that bad. I do close in shots like Wolverine and Cardiac Bowl in my alpine boots all the time. Up until a few years ago I did them with Trekkers as well. Lots of people did/do. Alpine boots suck if you're doing long approaches and walking around a lot, but for short tours I've never had any complaints with them.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I just saw a web sit selling trekkers for $180 bucks!
Holy Crapes Batman!
Considering that my alpine boot wasn't made for that type of motion, I think I'll just get some cross-country skis and boots.

How many different options are there?
X-country
Telemark
AT (whatever that is)
more?

What's the differrence?

Thing is the hills around my place are small. It would be like climb for 15 minutes ski down for 2 minutes, ski along for 10, up for 10, down for 1 etcetera. you get the picture. I don't want to be fiddling with bindings and removing skins every 10 minutes. I also would prefer not to free-heel down some of the more fun lines.
I remember some of my first skiing was done on old WWII surplus wooden skis with cable bindings and leather boots. You could adjust the cables to hold your heel down by clipping them near the back, or farther forward for x-country type skiing. I don't suppose I could find some of those in the local Sally Anne these days.
Ghost: It sounds like you need waxless skis with tele bindings and boots. Many of the major companies are making fatter waxless skis with full on metal edges. Stuff like:
http://www.backcountry.com/store/KAH...Guide-Ski.html

If you get medium stout tele boots and bindings you can cruise up and down the hills without messing with skins and just do parallel turns. Just because you have a free heel dosen't mean you have to do drop knee turns. I have several friends who ski the bc on tele gear by never make tele turns. Think outside the conventional setup and cruise the bc in light weight comfort that'll let you do some parallel powder turns when the situation presents itself.
post #10 of 13
cross posted from another Trekker thread (above): mine are for sale for $75. Excellent condition, new straps. Ship from 80246 or pickup in Denver or Summit Co.
post #11 of 13
Snowshoes are not bad by themselves. The are a pain in the rear if you are trying to climb a slope with your skis on your back then descend with the snowshoes on your back. They are great for hiking but just don't mix with skis that well.

Trekkers are easy to use and allow you to foray into the bc without major investment in gear. They don't tour as well AT bindings, they require extra time to get in and out of the the bindings. That being said, a great way to get into the bc and ensure it's where you want to be
post #12 of 13

Are those trekkers still around

post #13 of 13

might be- I am still waiting to here from the person who wanted to buy them, I will try and let you know soon. 

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