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Tights for skiing

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
For years I've skied in an uninsulated shell snow pant, just wearing a pair of sweats underneath. I've used sweats with pockets, so I can wear them to and from the ski area. My personal choice for snow pants was a design with full side zippers so that I could do the "work" of putting on my socks & boots (somewhat of a struggle for an old, fat guy) without working up a sweat inside my ski outer duds.

I'm now faced with skiing in a uniform pant that not only is insulated but has to be put on before the boots go on. So I need to ditch the sweat pants and get some really thin tights I can wear under jeans to get to the ski hill and then wear inside the ski pants I'm sure will be way to warm for me most of the time.

I don't have anything like that. So what's available (brand names, if possible) that won't add any significant warmth? Will a silk product add to my overheating?
post #2 of 10
Hello,

It might be worth your while to try some cycling base layers and bib tights. They're available in a wide variety of materials and weights, thickness, and lengths, with or without the built in bib suspender straps. (Take my word on this one: they positively will not stay put without the bib straps though.) Just take a look into any cycling web site or catalog.

I've been using them in all 3 of the basic lengths - shorts, knickers (mid-calf length) and full length tights on road and mountain bikes for 25-plus years. I was just out this morning on the bike, as usual, in grey 30's F weather, in full regalia including tights. My favorite winter riding clothes happens to be Giordana and Castelli, but practically any brand is pretty darned good. They look very similar to Nordic cross country ski wear, and work about the same.

I rarely ever use them for ski underwear anymore, only the coldest days, or for truly wickedly cold night skiing. But apparently quite a few people do wear them most of the time. The knicker length is perfect, just above the boot cuffs. One caveat; the bike racing versions, particularly the Italian brands, are cut pretty slender.

Hope this helps.

Smiles,
post #3 of 10
Sweater tights by companies like Danskin work well. If you have snug boots you won't even need to use socks. They are hard to find though. Your best bet would be to check out some dance supply stores.
post #4 of 10
You might just want to use a pair of mesh athletic shorts- I find that they work well with any sort of pants (you know, in the important parts). I now wear a pair of mesh shorts almost everyday during the winter underneath my pants, whether i'm skiing that day or not. Becasue your ski pants are insulated, warmth probably won't be an issue, and you can always just throw on a pair of long under under them and you won't have to work about having an undesirable body type.
post #5 of 10
Kneale: For years I have just worn what I ski in to drive to and from the hill. Waterproof marmot shell pant (insulated knee pads), silk tights and on days that are predicted to be severe cold, I have an old pair of waffels cut to the knee to put over that.

Our drive to the hill is about an hour and a half. I just never understood the need for all that changing.

I may ditch the waffels and silk and try a pair of those fuzzy new un's like hot chillies or something.

I will admit to sending one of the women into the coat room when I know one of the guys is in there doing the "quick change two step" ... the gals are in on the joke and usually stand there and feign amazement and shock while the door is held open. [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

[ December 20, 2003, 04:25 PM: Message edited by: yuki ]
post #6 of 10
I"d say go silk. Nothing is as warm, light and comfortable as silk. I've got hi tech fibers long johns also, but silk is my fave.

I don't find my legs sweat alot so the wicking of the high tech stuff is irrelevant. Now for my top I like the wicking fabrics.
post #7 of 10
From your post, I take that you no longer walk to the hill in just the undergarment.

I suggest to you that, if that is the case, you just need short technical undies whether jammer-short-length Brynje or Pearl Izumi hiker briefs or Patagonia Phundamental Shorts or Jockey Sport Briefs or Reebok Coolmax compression shorts (all of which I've used, at one time or another, with nothing but socks beneath Moonstone pants, down to -15F).
post #8 of 10
Kneale -

I just ran into a similar problem. Like you, I have probably spent most of the past 30 or so seasons skiing with minimal insulation under a shell top (ie, 60/40 in the old days, GoreTex or something similar in more recent years) & shell bottom.

This year, I am teaching at Whitetail, and their uniform jacket is insulated and too hot for me on many days. The only other alternatives they offer are a fleece top and a fleece vest, but those collect snow, doesn't stop the wind, etc.

Anyway, I had to find something lighter to use under their jacket. Yesterday, at REI, I happened upon a thin Men's zip T-neck made out of a material called "MTS Power Dry" by Polartec. It supposedly has minimal insulating power, just wicking. It's supposed to be perfect for stop-and-go cold weather activities like skiing:

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?s toreId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=607431 8&parent_category_rn=4501408

For your use, they also sell bottoms made out of the same material:

http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDispl ay?productId=14140021&storeId=8000&catalogId=40000 008000&langId=-1&addon=656133-687012

It was pretty humorous trying to convince the salesman that someone standing around a snow covered mountain all day really needed clothing to help keep me cool. [img]smile.gif[/img]

I'll let you know how it works out. Tmmrw will be its maiden voyage.

Tom / PM

[ December 21, 2003, 07:15 AM: Message edited by: PhysicsMan ]
post #9 of 10
One of the features on my new ski pants is crotch vents.If I get too warm down there I can just let THE BOYS air out a little.
post #10 of 10
Shorts, just plain old athletic shorts. That's all you need. I still get hot in those with a thinly insulated pair of ski pants and several open vents.

Ty [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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