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Modify boot inserts

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Where can I buy the dense foam, sticky sided material to put on boot inserts to prevent hot spots?
post #2 of 11
When Mr TC had his boots fitted, as much as he would allow a fitting, the boot shop had stuff they use. I'm sure you can find it somewhere, but recognizing a hot spot and knowing for sure what to do to fix it are two different things. There is a special talent in boot fitting.
post #3 of 11
WOW, Florida.

Find a good boot fitter and have it done correctly. Trust us when we tell you to pay the man, he knows what he's doing.
post #4 of 11
Double sided carpet tape works well to attach sheet foam to boot liners. You can buy it at any good hardware store like Ace. It will stick very well yet allow you to remove the pad, relocate or change the size of the pad with no real negative impact to the liner.

Finding good foam may be a little harder. Sometimes craft stores will carry small sheets of thin durable foam. I remember at one point finding some at Walmart. Cut up yoga pads, exercise pads, or sleeping pads will work as well, but you may need to thin most of them down.

Experimenting in this way is not permanent, is cheap, and is a good way to play with various fit aids in your boots and gain some experience. If you do find a placement that works, the tape will hold it there as long as you want. Nothing wrong with trying things on your own, just use common sense.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
Finding good foam may be a little harder. Sometimes craft stores will carry small sheets of thin durable foam. I remember at one point finding some at Walmart. Cut up yoga pads, exercise pads, or sleeping pads will work as well, but you may need to thin most of them down.
kayak and small boat outfitting shops usually sell closed cell EVA foam, not as firm as some bootfitter foams but that might be a good thing for not creating new problems.

(oh, and you could always glue pieces of those mylar Xmas balloons on the underside to keep the warmies in.)
post #6 of 11
http://tognar.com/boot_heater_warmer...snowboard.html

Scroll down to "boot foam." You can use Barge cement or similar to firmly attach it when you've got it located correctly.
post #7 of 11
Hot spots are typically the start of a blister. The solution is to control movement within the liner. Do this with a good custom or off the shelf footbed if you don't have them. If you do and you still have movement a full shim can help. On the other hand if your hot spot is a pressure point then that spot needs to be loosened with grinding or stretching the shell. A decent bootfitter can tell you what is going on and what can be done. It is rarely as simple as applying foam to the "hot spot".
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks ya'll. I should have said pressure points, i.e., my protruding ankle bones on my skinney ankles become painful. I need some volume around my ankles, except over my ankle bones. I have tried a "good boot fitter" but the boots they started with just didn't cut it, even after many return trips for adjustments. My current boots are almost where I want them.
post #9 of 11
From my experience a protruding ankle usually needs more room in the shell. Not padding on the liner. Padding in a confined space only increases pressure. This is a very common problem in boots that fit and usually not much of a problem to fix with either a slight shell grind in the appropriate spot or spots or with a heat and stretch shell expansion. But the first place I always go is to the sole of the foot. Do you use footbeds/orthotics in these boots? If the feet are not stabalized first then all you are doing is accommodating movement. This usually happens on the inside (medial) ankle because of pronation. Get that under control and you won't need to buckle the cuff as tight to get control over the ski.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamindoggies View Post
But the first place I always go is to the sole of the foot. Do you use footbeds/orthotics in these boots? If the feet are not stabalized first then all you are doing is accommodating movement. This usually happens on the inside (medial) ankle because of pronation. Get that under control and you won't need to buckle the cuff as tight to get control over the ski.
Very good advice to start here. If issues continue, there are two possible remedies:

1. Move inner shell out away from ankle (grinding, punching, stretching).

2. Padding around ankle bone (not over it) - sort of "encircling it".
post #11 of 11
Quote:
I have tried a "good boot fitter" but the boots they started with just didn't cut it,
obviously not such a good bootfitter then

not really much more to add to what has already been said
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