EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Side Edge - How do you know if your doing it right?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Side Edge - How do you know if your doing it right?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Taking a metal file to my skis makes me nervous but I know it is important to have sharp edges. So based on my local shops advice, I purchased a Homokol variable edge guide, metal files and diamond stones.

After intially being freaked out about the amount of metal that I was removing from the edges, they feel sharp but what I'm not sure is if I am dding it correctly or not. I guess I'll find out next time I'm skiing, but is there any way to know if you are sharpening the edges correctly?

Thanks.
post #2 of 11
There are better tuners on this forum then me, but I do a pretty good job as a DIY - so here's my advice:

Files are cutting tools and should be used only rarely. As you noted, files remove lots of material, and are useful for setting your edge bevel. Now that you've set it (to 2 or 3 degrees on the side), put them away.

Diamond stones, too, are cutting tools, but do so on a finer scale. From now on through the season, just use these. After each day out, work your edges with a medium or fine grit diamond stone (either by hand, trying to match the side bevel, or with your guiding tool). This will keep your edges sharp.

Another note. After you've used a file (or even a diamond stone), you will have created a burr that should be removed. (Burrs feel very sharp and they may fool you into thinking that you've done a great job, but they're sharpness is only ephemeral and, in the end, will only let you down.) To remove the burr, work a fine diamond stone down the base edge, trying to match the base bevel (1 degree). Now your edges are sharp and smooth - go and dominate the mountain!

Finally, go on YouTube and watch a video of a professional sharpening their edges. Here's one from SVST that's pretty good (it's a two-parter and will put you on the right track).

Good luck and have fun!
post #3 of 11
It may help you to take a sharpie marker and put some ink on the edge before you file to see how much your taking off.

You shouldn't need to remove to much.
post #4 of 11
I generally use the marker trick followed by the finger nail test. Tuning is a learned skill, reading will point you in the right direction but in the end you're going to have to go out there and learn it the hard way
post #5 of 11
I have a related question for the experts here.

I have read Dipstick's excellent guide and am trying to tune my own skis. My skis (Fischer RX8) have 1 degree base and 3 degree side bevels. I am looking for a 3 degree side guide but couldn't find one here after visiting a few stores. The most common ones are 2 degree. Is 3 degree side bevel not so common?

Also, how do you figure out the existing bevels on skis previously serviced by ski shops (my kids skis)?

I am not trying to change the angles. Just want to sharpen the skis and maintain the existing bevels.

Thanks.

Jack

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiNut View Post
Taking a metal file to my skis makes me nervous but I know it is important to have sharp edges. So based on my local shops advice, I purchased a Homokol variable edge guide, metal files and diamond stones.

After intially being freaked out about the amount of metal that I was removing from the edges, they feel sharp but what I'm not sure is if I am dding it correctly or not. I guess I'll find out next time I'm skiing, but is there any way to know if you are sharpening the edges correctly?

Thanks.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
I am looking for a 3 degree side guide but couldn't find one here after visiting a few stores.
I have several for sale here:
http://www.racewax.com/category/tool..._single_angle/

and some under $20 here:
http://www.racewax.com/category/z_ac...loseout_items/

All are 20% of the listed price now. So for example there is a Swix one that you can get for about $16.
post #7 of 11
Jack, I would recommend the SVST guide kit that comes with a 90 deg guide (anodized aluminum / stainless steel) and then 1,2,3 deg shims. For not that much more than the price of a single guide, you get a whole range of angles. It's made quite well and has a precise fit.

An informal way to check the angle is to clamp a true bar onto the guide and eyeball fit against the edge angle. If you have 0,1,2,3 guides or shims, you will see that one of them fits better than the others, and it's a good indication which angle the edges have been tuned to. It doesn't sound like a lot, but you can detect 1 deg by eye with the right tools.
post #8 of 11
Skier219, thank you for your suggestion. I will go for your solution.

Jack

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Jack, I would recommend the SVST guide kit that comes with a 90 deg guide (anodized aluminum / stainless steel) and then 1,2,3 deg shims. For not that much more than the price of a single guide, you get a whole range of angles. It's made quite well and has a precise fit.

An informal way to check the angle is to clamp a true bar onto the guide and eyeball fit against the edge angle. If you have 0,1,2,3 guides or shims, you will see that one of them fits better than the others, and it's a good indication which angle the edges have been tuned to. It doesn't sound like a lot, but you can detect 1 deg by eye with the right tools.
post #9 of 11
Here's the kit:



...or you can get a 92° guide and clamp with a 1° shim.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post
Jack, I would recommend the SVST guide kit that comes with a 90 deg guide (anodized aluminum / stainless steel) and then 1,2,3 deg shims. For not that much more than the price of a single guide, you get a whole range of angles. It's made quite well and has a precise fit.

An informal way to check the angle is to clamp a true bar onto the guide and eyeball fit against the edge angle. If you have 0,1,2,3 guides or shims, you will see that one of them fits better than the others, and it's a good indication which angle the edges have been tuned to. It doesn't sound like a lot, but you can detect 1 deg by eye with the right tools.
you may want to think about getting a 91 with a 1,2 3 degree shim. you will never use the 90 degree by itself.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Here's the kit:



...or you can get a 92° guide and clamp with a 1° shim.
I should really get this...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Side Edge - How do you know if your doing it right?