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School me in setting up a touring rig

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I went for a walk in the neighbourhood last week.







Looks like I needs me a touring set up.

I know almost nothing about it, 'cept'n it's kinda like cross-country with slightly sturdier boots and the bindings allow heel to be locked down when desired.

School me.
post #2 of 14
I'm still putting mine together but the general idea is to snag a ski that is light and versatile and that you are comfortable on in a variety of conditions (think specifically refrozen mank, taters, Spring corn, and powder).

On the bindings front you either have traditional touring bindings (Fritsche, Naxo), which can be a tad flimsy if you're used to sturdy alpine binders. Then there's the Duke/Baron, which are burlier, heavier, and you have to click out of to switch to tour mode. Finally theres' Dynafit, which are the ultra-light binders that require a special Dynafit adaptive boot. There's also the Trekkers option, which is a rig you insert into your alpine bindings and it allows you to walk in them.

The boots are something I haven't checked out, but there are really only a few brands out there (Scarpa, Garmont being the main ones, but there's a couple of other boots out there, as well), so you just need to go try some on.

At any rate, you'll be better served getting more info from somebody more experienced than i, but that's the gist coming from somebody who is in the process of setting up his own touring rig.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
That Trekkers option sounds intriguing; I could use my Machete Gs (Ok, so they are not exactly light = more exercise for me).
post #4 of 14
For the kinda stuff in your photos, I'd pick up some closeout AT boots, buy some Freerides off ebay or TGR and just grab whatever soft, wide ski you can get.

My AT rig right now is Sanouks with old Freerides and Scarpa Denalis (or my alpine boots, depending on how far/gnar I'm going). This works great in the Wasatch, but the Sanouks are a bit much for the Keweenaw Penninsula in Upper MI, where these photos were taken:



The terrain in the UP looks a lot like the stuff in your photos. If I was to set up a rig just for this kind of stuff, I'd go with an AT boot with a lugged, rockered sole, a pair of Freerides and a fairly soft ski in the 130-95-120 range. I would never buy a new pair of skis for touring - you don't need pristine bases or immaculate edges and you will likely hit a lot of rocks.
post #5 of 14
A kinder gentler Jer Bear
Bwwahhhh
post #6 of 14
no touring set-up works without skins.

Trekkers suck to use, they are heavier (trekker+alpine binding+alpine ski)... but they are cheap, they can be loaned out to friends and you don't need a new ski set-up.

Naxo/Fritschi work great for touring and can handle aggressive skiing on soft snow, they can be used with an alpine boot or AT boot... I don't like the way the feel on harder snow.

Duke/ Baron about a pound heavier than Nx/Fr ski way better in any condition, lower stack height than NX/Fr, alpine or AT boot compatible, downside... tour mode lever is under foot so you must remove your boot to switch modes, that's about it... well, price is also I guess.

Dynafit lightest, best touring, lowest stack height, remarkably solid. Downside is you MUST have a Dynafit compatible boot and they are a bit finicky to use.

Silveratta... not a really good option unless you are touring to travel not to ski.

Skis- any wide-ish used ski is the way to start, weight shouldn't be a major consideration until you need to travel long distances. For Yo-yo skiing your favorite fat ski will be a good way to go.

Having a touring boot is very, very nice but not a necessity. You can get by using an alpine boot.

One last thing, short steep slopes are often easier to just boot pack up... just walking up works in many instances.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
no touring set-up works without skins.

Trekkers suck to use, they are heavier (trekker+alpine binding+alpine ski)... but they are cheap, they can be loaned out to friends and you don't need a new ski set-up.

Naxo/Fritschi work great for touring and can handle aggressive skiing on soft snow, they can be used with an alpine boot or AT boot... I don't like the way the feel on harder snow.

Duke/ Baron about a pound heavier than Nx/Fr ski way better in any condition, lower stack height than NX/Fr, alpine or AT boot compatible, downside... tour mode lever is under foot so you must remove your boot to switch modes, that's about it... well, price is also I guess.

Dynafit lightest, best touring, lowest stack height, remarkably solid. Downside is you MUST have a Dynafit compatible boot and they are a bit finicky to use.

Silveratta... not a really good option unless you are touring to travel not to ski.

Skis- any wide-ish used ski is the way to start, weight shouldn't be a major consideration until you need to travel long distances. For Yo-yo skiing your favorite fat ski will be a good way to go.

Having a touring boot is very, very nice but not a necessity. You can get by using an alpine boot.

One last thing, short steep slopes are often easier to just boot pack up... just walking up works in many instances.
Somebody should tell the moderators to make this reply a sticky.

Best, most concise, bullet-pointed answer to the perennial alpine touring setup questions I've ever seen.

Very well done, Whiteroom!

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Silveratta... not a really good option unless you are touring to travel not to ski.
Oh really have you used silverattas or is that just somethin you read on the interweb.
I've toured the past 3 seasons on silveratta pure freerides.
Dins to 12, good touring stride, light (2.2lbs,) Broke one in ~
250 days of skiing and that was my fault stepping in wrong. They are durable
pic from last week
Ive taken them to AK for a week of skiing on the Ruth Glacier

Hucked Pillow lines at the Blanket Glacier Chalet outside Revelstoke

I'm 220 and ski them pretty hard with a scarpa denali tt.
They lack tortional stiffness but if you are a decent skier that's fairly moot.

Ive finally broken down and went the dynafit route now that the managed to come out with a 12 din binder and I have dukes naxos and damirs on skis and have broken them all cept Dukes. So if your gonna stickey things please have some sort of idea about what your talkin about
post #9 of 14
I've seen 2 pair of Pure's break within moments of hitting the snow for the first time (one broke on the very first turn) one skier is a former NorAm level skier, about 165 lbs, the other was a female race coach, about 125lbs. They both snapped at the casting seem on the toe piece where the toe height screw is. I'm sure there are people skiing them with success, but I'd spend MY money on one of the other options.

If my post were to become a sticky (not my idea or intent) I'd want my 'opinions' removed... the silveretta comment is 100% personal opinion. I'm sure there are plenty of users like SFB who have great experiences. Same for the Naxo/ Fritschi 'flex feel' comment, 100% personal opinion.
post #10 of 14
http://www.powdermag-community.com/v...-gear-brockers
Whatever they work for me but, I'm sure your noram friends and you are much more knowledgeable and skilled in the bc (Eye rolling winkie)
post #11 of 14
IMO opinons on products you have never used are pretty pointless, but it's the interweb and everybodies a level 9 expert
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
IMO opinons on products you have never used are pretty pointless, but it's the interweb and everybodies a level 9 expert
I'll completely agree with you that *any* AT binding has breakage issues (Dynafit being the least likely to suffer any problems), but I also have two friends who broke Pures in less than a season.

I fully realize that Naxo went through a very breakage-prone model and Fritschis have also been known to come apart, but the only two people I know who had Pures broke them. I like the idea of how light they are with a full step-in functionality, but I'm just not ready to consider them a serious alternative until I hear about a lot more experiences like yours.

I'm glad yours worked so well for you.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
A kinder gentler Jer Bear
Bwwahhhh
That's just because over here I can't say "**********" or "***-guzzeling*********" or even "**********-bag". Let alone "************* ***-raping ******-******".

But from your posts here I can see that you're really out to win friends and influence people!

I skied some 404's once. Now everytime I hear the word "Silveratta" I feel like killing something. I don't know - the Pure's may be great, but I just can't get over that experience all those years ago.

Plus a used pair of Freerides or Naxos will probably be easier to find than a used pair of Pures.
post #14 of 14
Sis all good just pisses me off when people talk smack about products they have never used. Silverttas have been a good binder for me given that I wouldn't buy a 10 din binding and until the past season dynoboots lacked stiffness. You best believe I took a spare on every yurt trip never needed them, but took them in case. Haven't mounted or ridden the dynos yet so I can't speak to that. You can score the silverttas or the atomic version pretty cheap on STP.
allrighty then back to the silvertta stoke


You'll be my friend wontcha Jer
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