New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bode Miller - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Who placed that gate at 31 sec. Look like the Austian gate keep moved it
post #32 of 55
Clips like that make me wonder:

How would Bode would stack-up alongside today's big-mountain icons - McConkey, Nobis, Seth and Sage - on a peak somewhere in Alaska?
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strato View Post
Clips like that make me wonder:

How would Bode would stack-up alongside today's big-mountain icons - McConkey, Nobis, Seth and Sage - on a peak somewhere in Alaska?
I would speculate that he would need some experience in the situations, snow types, equipment & terrain those guys ski. Keep in mind that Nobis was a high level World Cup racer before turning to freeskiing. He would probably have raced longer had there been a "Team America" at the time. He was setting precedent on big lines shortly after his retirement from the US ski team. McConkey has done it all. I don't know much about Seth & Sage, except that they've got some mad twisting & hucking skills.

Once Bode got the experience, with his athletisism, & probably superior conditioning he would be right there with them. I also think if Daron Rahlves hadn't decided to take the SkierX route to the 2010 Olympics, he would also be a top Big Mountain guy now.

There is nothing more extreme than World Cup Downhill... FACT. (to use the word of the revered Chaos) .

JF
post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
I would speculate that he would need some experience in the situations, snow types, equipment & terrain those guys ski. Keep in mind that Nobis was a high level World Cup racer before turning to freeskiing. He would probably have raced longer had there been a "Team America" at the time. He was setting precedent on big lines shortly after his retirement from the US ski team. McConkey has done it all. I don't know much about Seth & Sage, except that they've got some mad twisting & hucking skills.

Once Bode got the experience, with his athletisism, & probably superior conditioning he would be right there with them. I also think if Daron Rahlves hadn't decided to take the SkierX route to the 2010 Olympics, he would also be a top Big Mountain guy now.

There is nothing more extreme than World Cup Downhill... FACT. (to use the word of the revered Chaos) .

JF
A friend of mine has been a guide here in Jackson Hole for over twenty years. He was one of Coombs' original Alaska heli guides. He can ski any terrain or condition with absolutely rock-solid technique. He's probably skied with (and/or guided) practically every ski-flick rock star in the universe over the last 20 years.

About ten years ago, he was the guide for a small party skiing backcountry here at Jackson. You should see his eyes light up when he describes how flat-out impressed he was with Bode's skills and guts. This is a guy who has arguably seen just about everything there is to see in big-mountain skiing and he was just blown away at Bode's speed, balance, and choice of line. And that was ten years ago on MUCH less forgiving equipment.

I think Bode could pretty well hold his own against the movie stars.
post #35 of 55
^Well, I thought it would be a bit presumptuous to say he would put them to shame.
JF
post #36 of 55
I have another story to go along with Bob's. At a friends party many years ago, in attendance was a young Glen Plake & a younger Sean Palmer (another incredible athlete). It was a good time & everyone was socializing till I popped a DH tape into the VCR. Mr. Plake glued his eyes to the screen & watched intently with a dropped jaw. All he could say was "Sean, you gotta come here & see these guys!"

JF
post #37 of 55
Just found this on another thread:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iAygsv2MD0
post #38 of 55
Big crashes exact a heavy price.

It's the prerogative of youth (especially males), to feel invincible and crave adrenaline.

When you're young you don't consider that life is long, and bodies need to last.

After the early damage I did, I'm grateful I can still ski

Only later do you realize that every break, twisted and torn ligament comes back to say hello.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
A friend of mine has been a guide here in Jackson Hole for over twenty years. He was one of Coombs' original Alaska heli guides. He can ski any terrain or condition with absolutely rock-solid technique. He's probably skied with (and/or guided) practically every ski-flick rock star in the universe over the last 20 years.

About ten years ago, he was the guide for a small party skiing backcountry here at Jackson. You should see his eyes light up when he describes how flat-out impressed he was with Bode's skills and guts. This is a guy who has arguably seen just about everything there is to see in big-mountain skiing and he was just blown away at Bode's speed, balance, and choice of line. And that was ten years ago on MUCH less forgiving equipment.

I think Bode could pretty well hold his own against the movie stars.
Yep...here at Squaw, we get the chance to watch Daron, Marco, Shane and many other WC and Big Mountain athletes 'just ski around'. They are 'all' amazing athletes that can 'do it all' and can easliy crossover without any 'practice' to get up to speed (no pun intended).
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
Just found this on another thread:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iAygsv2MD0
Great stuff. I still remember in 85, at the start in Kitz, hearing over the US team radios "Aihara just rolled down the fence after the Mause", and thinking "that must just be a figure of speech. How can someone really roll along the top of a picket fence?"

Then I saw the clip...
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
Great stuff. I still remember in 85, at the start in Kitz, hearing over the US team radios "Aihara just rolled down the fence after the Mause", and thinking "that must just be a figure of speech. How can someone really roll along the top of a picket fence?"

Then I saw the clip...
And they say Bullriding extreme.
post #42 of 55
Wow, this is probably one of the most badass threads in a while, not just because of the video but the stories people tell afterwards... Keep 'em coming! I've never raced a day in my life but the athleticism of these guys and gals just boggles my mind!
post #43 of 55

Here, try this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoWork View Post
Wow, this is probably one of the most badass threads in a while, not just because of the video but the stories people tell afterwards... Keep 'em coming! I've never raced a day in my life but the athleticism of these guys and gals just boggles my mind!

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/snownews...ws-2003Feb.pdf

and this:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...1-Speed101.pdf
post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
Great stuff. I still remember in 85, at the start in Kitz, hearing over the US team radios "Aihara just rolled down the fence after the Mause", and thinking "that must just be a figure of speech. How can someone really roll along the top of a picket fence?"

Then I saw the clip...
Pretty amazing that you guys raced with those rickety wooden fences for barriers.

The first WC downhill I got to be a spectator at was Kitzbuhel in 1981. As I watched from behind the fence, I would jump back about 10' every time a racer would come by . The local Austrian boys would laugh at me, but I just couldn't get used to those guys coming so fast with only that little fence between them & me.

Anyone who has never seen a DH up close & personal, needs to get their butt to Beaver Creek or one of the classics in Europe. TV & Youtube just can't do it justice.


JF
post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
Pretty amazing that you guys raced with those rickety wooden fences for barriers.

The first WC downhill I got to be a spectator at was Kitzbuhel in 1981. As I watched from behind the fence, I would jump back about 10' every time a racer would come by . The local Austrian boys would laugh at me, but I just couldn't get used to those guys coming so fast with only that little fence between them & me.

Anyone who has never seen a DH up close & personal, needs to get their butt to Beaver Creek or one of the classics in Europe. TV & Youtube just can't do it justice.


JF
How true...nothing compares to 'live in-person'! Unbelievable... At least now days, there's usually a few more layers of fences.
post #46 of 55

Bode Miller has the big mountain skills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strato
How would Bode would stack-up alongside today's big-mountain icons - McConkey, Nobis, Seth and Sage - on a peak somewhere in Alaska?

I think this Bode Miller Tribute video from Youtube illustrates many of Bode's skills



0:16 one ski move & incredible balancing act
1:25 window rolling move
3:10 big air
3:55 jump & 360 spin
4:03 wall slide
5:02 one leg twister


Also I think Bode had a big mountain segment in the Alyeska, AK backcountry in the 2007 Warren Miller Playground film as evidenced by the following sequence notes.

http://www.skitheworld.com/press_med...Playground.pdf

Bode Miller – Alyeska, AK
Athletes: Bode Miller
Equipment: Skis, Helicopter

Olympic Gold Medalist Bode Miller is the 25-Time World Cup Victor and the sole character in the insightful narrative about “pushing the limits” and “living on the edge.” Bode Miler certainly embraces the rock star lifestyle, but he proves that his greatest passion is skiing when he hits the Alyeska backcountry. Here, Bode explains that skiing “is a freedom that’s really…intimate to the soul.” This trip, courtesy of Chugach Powder Guides, is an ambitious endeavor. The striking images showcased here definitely exemplify Bode’s need for speed and humble the strong personality of this global superstar.


If someone has the Warren Miller Playground dvd, it seems like the Bode Miller big mountain segment may be in Chapter 5.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....uct&id=1894385
Details tab

ChaptersDisc #1 -- Playground
1. Opening [3:46]
2. Whistler Blackcomb [8:20]
3. USFSO [4:55]
4. Cordova, AK [7:22]
5. Bode Miller [3:30]
6. Snowboarding [3:36]
7. Sleeper House [1:43]
8. Utah [8:38]
9. Dubai [4:33]
10. Water Weenie [1:34]
11. The Smalls [6:43]
12. Aspen, CO [7:49]
13. Tordrillo Lodge, AK [9:16]
14. Joi [4:38]
15. Japan [7:48]
16. Speedriding [4:55]
17. Grand Finale [3:41]
18. Credits [5:28]



Bormio, Italy DH February 2005 - Bode Miller one ski



Loses one ski at 0:22

77.9 kmh/48.4 mph at 0:36

Still attacking the course & brushes gate at 0:40

Modified one ski tuck position at 1:37

Accelerates on one ski to 83.3 kmh/51.8 mph at 1:56

Finally falls on tight turn at 2:10 (racing 108 seconds on one ski with speeds up to almost 52 mph)



Bode Miller - sense of humor



0:27 new training techniques

1:39 scrambling for sponsors
post #47 of 55
I've always liked this: Bode doing a sportskool lesson on pole planting. Most of it is skiing flat groomed terrain, but from 8:45-9:05 (esp at 9:55) he's playing around on some steeper bumps, and you can get a sense of what an awesome awesome skier he is off the race course. Just fun to watch anyone that good.

http://www.sportskool.com/videos/pole-planting
post #48 of 55
Thanks for putting that together SkierScott.
I'll add one more thing to the first video. At 4:22 there is a clip of the 2nd SL run of the combined at the 2002 Olympics, after recovering from sliding on his side in the DH & almost coming to a stop in the 1st SL run. If you look at the top clock it shows that he was 4.42 seconds behind coming into that run. That Slalom run made up all of his defecit, & he ended up getting the Silver medal just behind Aamodt. A very, very fast run of SL.
JF
post #49 of 55
Has anyone checked out the results fromthe first 2 training runs from the Lake Louise DH? I don't know if it's cool to put them here, but it is looking good.

The third training run starts at 11:30 local time, with live timing here:

http://www.fis-ski.com/uk/604/1228.h..._suchsector=AL

JF
post #50 of 55
Miller and Cuche chose not to take their 3rd training run today - DNS's for the horses. Svindal just outside striking distance today. Lakle Louise is THE glide track of the season.

I'm bummed I'll be working on the slope tomorrow during race time.... my money for tomorrow's event? Miller. What a touch he has.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
PSIA is about efficiency, making skiing look effortless and smooth. WC raciers are only concerned about getting down the hill as fast as possible. Bode is a master at regaining balance. If he slowed down like the rest of us, I'm positive he would make perfect turns...but why bother? I'd like to ski like Bode any day.
I agree with you wholeheartedly with the change of one word. PSIA seems to be concerned about aesthetics (looking good) more than efficiency.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickS View Post
I agree with you wholeheartedly with the change of one word. PSIA seems to be concerned about aesthetics (looking good) more than efficiency.
Rick, I see and hear similar sentiments pretty regularly and I have to say it just confuses me.

I'm part of a fairly big ski school (Jackson Hole). I'm not a member of PSIA but a very large percentage of the schoolers are. Almost every one of the trainers is a Level III and many of them are examiners and demo people and whatnot.

I've taken a whole lot of clinics from and skied with a bunch of these PSIA people and I just absolutely NEVER hear any emphasis on aesthetics. I'm totally about efficiency and whatever type of turn "works" in an endless variety of terrain and snow conditions. That's exactly the same attitude and philosophy I get from our PSIA folks.

Maybe PSIA is completely different in the rest of the country, but here in Jackson Hole I see instructors training people (clients as well as other instructors) to make efficient turns in multiple conditions.

Sorry to dump on you but I must live in a microcosm because I just don't see what you're describing.
post #53 of 55
The term "efficient" is a slippery word that means different things to different people. We've had discussions on that here in this forum for the enterprising young googler to find out.

Bottom line in a race course is getting down FAST and when someone like Bode seems to defy conventional wisdom about what will make a skier fast then any comments about how he looks, ie his aesthetics become a completely moot point.

However, while folks in the PSIA organization are in fact looking closely at particular skills to see how effectively they are being executed, there is no question that the only metric they have to determine whether or not those skills are being executed effectively is in fact to pay attention to how the skier looks...ie....aethetics. Don't take that comment personally. Some skiers can take that to an extreme and look for more than just skillful execution of skills but also look for certain stylistic aesthetics and consider one style superior to another. That DOES happen in the ski instructing world. I'm not saying its prevalant, nor am I saying that its the PSIA's mission, but you're crazy if you don't think that doesn't happen at every resort everywhere, from top to bottom in the ski school hierarchies.

The simple truth is that a racer is judged by their course time and a ski instructor or trainee is judged in one way or another by how they look. Ideally the things being assessed will be more like stance posture, how much snow is flying off the skiis, how round their turn shape is, etc... Those are all aesthetic aspects. In some cases they do indicate more effective skiing. Not always. But that's besides the point. The point is that the judgement can only be made by visually assessing the skier aesthetically and making a judgement call about whether the skier is executing the desired skills based upon how they look.

Unfortunately, in the ski school world, the fundamentals of skiing are often dummied down as much as possible for very practical and valid reasons related to how ski schools have to operate. As such, I would guess that the vast majority of ski instructors...and I mean VAST MAJORITY, are truly not capable of analyzing someone else's skiing visually without comparing against some kind of baseline image they are told to look for...and there is definitely a substantial portion of that I would deem aesthetic. No question about it.

Hey don't get me wrong. Skiers have been trying to "look good" for more than 50 years, including a number of well paid video stars and for me personally I consider skiing to be an art, like dancing, and looking good is part of it.

There is nothing WRONG with being aesthetic. But there is no place for it in racing.
post #54 of 55
Balance skills,,,,, there's efficiency,,,, and then there's versatility.... Not out of balance, just skilled. If he was out of balance he'd fall down.

Got Balance?
post #55 of 55
I have seen Bode freeriding in Alaska...he straightlines, he hucks 30+ footers...never have I seen better off-piste skiing. A select few are as good, give or take...

Make no mistake, Bode rips in the backcountry.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching