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What pack do you use

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm trying to find a good pack to use while skiing. I have a Nikon D80 with an 18-200 VR lens. This is quite likely the only setup I'll take in addition to my P&S camera. My intent is to carry the camera in smallish pack, and the Dakine packs seem to be pretty big, although I haven't seen them in person, so it's hard to judge. If anyone has had any success fitting a camera block into a smaller pack, please share. I wonder if I could use a Backcountry Access Stash pack or the Dakine Baker pack?

Thanks!
post #2 of 12
I have the D80 and used the 70-200 2.8 VR lens last year, which is quite a bit bigger than the 18-200. I used a Camelbak Snowblast hydration pack last year and it fit the camera, lens, water, extra pair of goggles, balaclava, and a few power bars, though it was tight!

CJ
post #3 of 12
str8down, this pack will probably be bigger than what you're looking for, but I'll post it just in case, and for other pack seekers who might be interested in it.

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Deluxe-B...89366& sr=8-8

I just got one and like it very much. Seems well made, well padded, and plenty of room in with, in addition to the main pack area, various zip pockets and velcro close pouches. Comes at a steal of a price. I bought it a couple weeks ago for $38. It's since gone up to $42
post #4 of 12
A Canon backpack for a Nikon user? Heresy, I say!

CJ
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO View Post
A Canon backpack for a Nikon user? Heresy, I say!

CJ
OK, think of it this way, then. If it says Canon on the pack, less likely it'll get stolen.
post #6 of 12
Yeah, DaKine Heli worked for me; extra layer; Sony Mini DV camcorder with a wide angle lens attached, and my Nikon D40/18-55 with a 100 ml bladder about half full, as well as some other items.

In the alternative, Kata makes some nice bags, or, if you're confident, try a Kata holster (see, Shutter M), if you want to travel light.
post #7 of 12

Forget about dedicated "camera" packs

No, no, no, don't even think about buying that Canon pack or another Nikon pack or even most of the small Lowe Pro packs. These "camera" packs are totally inadequate in an active sport situation- they are made mostly to look good in the store. The worst thing about them is the harness system, it never keeps the pack close to your body and it almost always lacks a proper hipbelt. And don't even try to do any technical skiing with a heavy camera in a pack without a hipbelt!!!

In my experience there are three features that are paramount in carrying a camera while skiing:
1. A good hipbelt that keeps the pack stable
2. A good harness that keeps the pack close to your back; either the adjustable harness or a proper back length is a must.
3. Backpanel access: it is a lot easier to dump your pack on the snow, open the backpanel and get your camera without trying to balance it or without getting the pack back all wet. You would especially appreciate that on a steep slope.

As you guessed, most of the "dedicated" photo packs do not give those options, and they are awfully unstable if you try to ski anything technical with them. My current solution is an Osprey Switch26- it is a dedicated skiing pack, so it has all the bells and whistles, nice carry system and back access. The main compartment fits my SLR with 70-200 lens in a Domke insert. The front and back panels are padded, so they protect the camera reasonably well.

I also used and own a dedicated photo skiing pack- Burton Zoom. This is the only dedicted ski pack that I consider fit for skiing, and I saw pros use it at Squaw, but to me it does not add much to what Osprey does, so I don't use it. You may like that pack.

Here is a picture of a friend that I took on a day when I carried a camera in the Osprey pack.



Alex

P.S. Most serious pros I saw prefer the LowePro or ThinkTank bags, but those are huge packs that are designed to carry a lot of gear and have a full-blown backpack carry system. I am sure this is not what you are interested in.
post #8 of 12
I have a LowePro CompuTrekker AW. It carries everything including my laptop. The drawbacks are: it is that it is a bulky bag and when fully loaded, it's heavy.
So, I tend to take everything in it, then decant what I am prepared to live without for the day. (flash, charger, laptop, sometimes one or more lenses)

http://products.lowepro.com/product/...AW,1924,16.htm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
I have a LowePro CompuTrekker AW. It carries everything including my laptop. The drawbacks are: it is that it is a bulky bag and when fully loaded, it's heavy.
So, I tend to take everything in it, then decant what I am prepared to live without for the day. (flash, charger, laptop, sometimes one or more lenses)

http://products.lowepro.com/product/...AW,1924,16.htm
I have the plus (bigger) version of that backpack. It's great protection, but I think that it way too bulky to use if you also want to ski as well.

CJ

PS- the Camelbak that I use has no padding. The only protection is from the extra clothing you can pack around the camera.. so don't fall!
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thank you thank you for the replies.

I have been looking and looking, and it seems like there are indeed two schools when it comes to cameras on the hill. There is the pro photographer setup where you are carrying 1 or 2 camera bodies and multiple lenses or you can carry just your camera and a super zoom.

Seems like the dedicated packs out there are more for the big loads than what I'm looking for. I saw the Dakine Heli in person today and bought it to take it home and test out the size.

I have the 20L version and there is a 16L that might be better if there is extra room for me. It doesn't have back panel access though, which I agree would be awesome. If you have top load that is bound to make you keep your camera on top, which would be funky on the weight distribution I think.
post #11 of 12
I was thinking about getting a top loader. An Osprey I think is the name. I have a prosumer video camera and, while it fits in my TNF Chugach and my Camelback Hawg, it's tight in both and I'm looking for just a tad roomier pack, hopefully, that will make it easier to get the camera in and out.

Good point about having to balance it though.
post #12 of 12
Osprey snow pack in 26L version has a backside access. 16L version does not and is inferior to the 26L version in more than one feature. I recommend the 26L version, it also compresses very well.

Alex

Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
I was thinking about getting a top loader. An Osprey I think is the name. I have a prosumer video camera and, while it fits in my TNF Chugach and my Camelback Hawg, it's tight in both and I'm looking for just a tad roomier pack, hopefully, that will make it easier to get the camera in and out.

Good point about having to balance it though.
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