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shell vs. insulation? - Page 2

Poll Results: Shells or insulated?

 
  • 61% (48)
    Shell
  • 6% (5)
    insulation
  • 29% (23)
    one of each
  • 2% (2)
    flawed poll (because all are)
78 Total Votes  
post #31 of 41
Shells (with hood ) and Layers = Versatility

A major benefit of shells is the ability to use them throughout the year. A disadvantage of insulated jackets is that choosing a fashion color means it will be out of date in the very near future.
post #32 of 41
Shell with layers. Unfortunately, I still can't find a replacement for my 15 y.o. North Face patrol jacket. Gore-tex, it's still waterproof. Heavy enough shell material, it blocks all wind. Has a removeable hood, pit zips and pockets galore. With a North Face denali fleece, I'm good, no matter what the temp.
I've tried many shells, either they're not waterproof enough, or windproof enough.
post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
I too never understood the whole "zip-in" thing.
Not much to understand - it allows you the option of an additional layer of insulation (or not) without the hassle of a separate garment; i.e., another zipper to open/close. That's all there is too it - it just makes life a bit simpler (vs. a shell with another zipped layer) when you put the jacket on, take it off, or zip it part way down when you get hot. And then the liner can be removed on warmer days (or part way through a day) rather than swapping jackets.

This probably all sounds rather "ho-hum", but for me I don't like owning multiple ski jackets since I have my ski pass clipped into one pocket, my cellphone tethered to the inside of another pocket, a watch attached to a zipper as a pull tab, sunscreen/powdercords/etc. hidden away in another pocket. It's a system that works for me (years of counseling hasn't changed my mind) and it would be a big hassle to move all this stuff from one jacket to another everytime I wanted to swap between a shell and an insulated jacket, but of course this convenience can be had with a shell and multiple layers, which brings me back to the advantages I noted in the first paragraph.

Clearly this whole "zip-in" thing appeals to my OCD-driven sense of organization and convenience (since my wife and ski buddies also look at my get-up like I'm crazy too). All I have to say to all of you is...!
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmblur View Post
Rarely, but it does.

The worst I've seen was at Sugarloaf USA, in January '94 (I think?) - it was below -40 degrees (C or F, take your pick!) and with absolutely wicked wind. The reported windchill (using the old formula, granted) was -95 degrees at the peak! YIKES! As you might imagine, the peak was closed, but I think they kept the lower lifts open.
That's pretty funny. The -15 degree day I mentioned at Stowe earlier in this thread was also in early January of '94, about a week after new years iirc. It was -15 at the base, they weren't reporting the temp at the top, or the wind chill, but it was quite windy. I was only able to ski a half day, it was just too cold for me.
post #35 of 41

Jac or Shell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post
Shells (with hood ) and Layers = Versatility

A major benefit of shells is the ability to use them throughout the year. A disadvantage of insulated jackets is that choosing a fashion color means it will be out of date in the very near future.

YOU ARE 100% RIGHT. I bought a very FASHIONABLE ski jacket last year in a Deep/Intense,Flourescent Purple Moave and damn it is out of the "Prada" mold already. I gave it to the Salvation Army-wrote off $899 price tag on my taxes as a Lose. Now I am looking at a Magenta/Blue/Aqua ensemble. Watcha Think? I JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT I AM GOING TO DO, LIFE IS JUST NOT FAIR.

Don't laugh now this is not funny. I am the most fashion conscious skier in Northern Idaho, Montana and Southern BC. My skis, boots, bindings, poles, pants, jacket and helmet are all the same color. Therefore I am color coordinated.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
I too never understood the whole "zip-in" thing.
Yup.

A nifty-sounding idea at the time, which is now crowding the discount racks.
post #37 of 41

shell

Shell
post #38 of 41
Shell + layers. Bottom layer is a silk t-neck, outer layer is a shell jacket. Rest varies based on conditions.

In the east, where powder shots above waist level are relatively rare, I prefer vents on the front of the jacket to pit zips because front vents tend to circulate more air through the jacket. TNF, Orage, Sessions and others make jackets with vents on the front. If you need to use the vents to stay comfortable, it often means you should get rid of a layer (not always).

STE
post #39 of 41

Hey, Just wondering on the whole shell vs. insualted jacket.  In your opinion, whats better for BC conditions (revelstoke). A 3 layer goretex shell with no insultation (armada Shifter) + layeing, or a 3 layer gore tex insulated (TDS system) jacket (Volcom Landvik).  I cant decide btwn the two, clearly the Volcom is warmer, but is this better for these conditins. Oh, and, the armada one has wayy mroe steeze.

post #40 of 41
Holy resurrection Batman

Shell. I spend a lot of time hiking or skinning, even at resorts. Being able to take a warm layer (down sweater) before my hike keeps me from overheating during the hike and still use my sidewinder shell to keep the wind/snow out.

Shell is the best way.
Edited by huhh - 10/20/12 at 5:30pm
post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetItStorm View Post

Hey, Just wondering on the whole shell vs. insualted jacket.  In your opinion, whats better for BC conditions (revelstoke). A 3 layer goretex shell with no insultation (armada Shifter) + layeing, or a 3 layer gore tex insulated (TDS system) jacket (Volcom Landvik).  I cant decide btwn the two, clearly the Volcom is warmer, but is this better for these conditins. Oh, and, the armada one has wayy mroe steeze.

Neither is better. Matter of personal preference.

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