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More Oil = More Snow

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
More oil equals more energy to make more snow. Especially here on the east coast. Check out all the data on the EIA Government web site.

Gas and Diesel prices going down means more snowmaking

Oil Imports by Year

EIA Home Page

Weekly Petroleum Status Report

Evidently President Bush never bothered to read this stuff.
post #2 of 9
I'm sure this is true, but for the most part the worthwhile skiing (even in the east) isn't subject to snowmaking. This is good for resorts and "skiing" generally, but I personally just don't care about whether or not Snowshed is looking nice.

I suspect a few inches of snow in backyards in Jersey does far more for the industry than cheap oil in any case.
post #3 of 9

More oil = less snow!

More oil = less snow!
Its more co2 in the atmosphere, less snow in the long term...

That's the reason why many resorts are so into wind and solar power.
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiago View Post
More oil = less snow!
Its more co2 in the atmosphere, less snow in the long term...

That's the reason why many resorts are so into wind and solar power.


PLEASE !!!! Solar power at ski areas is PURE marketing. Rich folks who pretend they care about the enviroment and want to ski at a place who also cares. All this while building more, larger villages, mega homes, fine dining resturants (just think of the energy it takes to heat these places where they have one table change a night....for people eating food shipped from all over the globe) What cars are these folks driving, privite planes into privite airports. Do you see the typical luggage load, they need a mega SUV to take a fam of 4.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thiago View Post
More oil = less snow!
Its more co2 in the atmosphere, less snow in the long term...

That's the reason why many resorts are so into wind and solar power.
Thiago you being from Brazil things are little different here in the states. All ski areas here in the Northeast of USA make snow and a lot of it. This especially true for states like Pennsylvania and Virgina. The first thing they put down is a layer of what is called white asphalt. This snow is extremely wet and not something you really want to ski in. The idea is to let that setup and freeze to provide a good base layer. Then they make layers of dryer snow on top which is not real fluffy dry natural snow but if done right what they call champagne man made powder. Man made powder if done right can be awesome stuff to put down some fresh tracks in.

I know of one ski area this year that has made a budget decission to make the price of oil be the deciding factor of how many trails are opened. Not how cold it is and not how much natural snow we get but the price of oil will determine how many trails are opened. Obviously cold and natural snow does also play a factor in trail management. The colder it is the cheaper it is to make snow.

Here is an excellent fictional book called Snow Waste I recommend reading sometime. The author did his research on snowmaking, which made this book very real to life.

I am not getting into the whole green thing here. Obviously ski areas are not very green when you take into account all the fuel it takes to get folks to the ski areas and the gallons of fuel it takes to groom those groomer trails every night even after mother nature put down a nice blanket of natural powder . On the other hand when it hasn't snowed in three weeks I guess its nice to have a groomer or two. Then you throw in those heated second homes that are 5000 square feet and only used by the owner 5 days a year. We recently found out that some folks here don't even know how many homes they own. They typically fly to Washington DC in their private jets with tin cup in hand asking the Government for 25 Billion of tax payer hand out.

Wow I got a little off topic here.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
All ski areas here in the Northeast of USA make snow and a lot of it.
Hyperbole, at best. My fave snowmaking-free eastern hill is no longer turning lifts...I'm quite sure there are some out there though that make little or no snow.
Quote:
I know of one ski area this year that has made a budget decission to make the price of oil be the deciding factor of how many trails are opened. Not how cold it is and not how much natural snow we get but the price of oil will determine how many trails are opened.
My first thought is that you or someone you heard this from is oversimplifying this. They plan on not opening runs if there is sufficient snow, even if they don't wish to groom them? Bizarre.
Quote:
Obviously ski areas are not very green when you take into account all the fuel it takes to get folks to the ski areas and the gallons of fuel it takes to groom those groomer trails every night even after mother nature put down a nice blanket of natural powder .
In my current location I need to drive to ski, lifts or not. When I ride lifts I eat far less per unit skiing. Lifts are far more energy efficient hill climbers than I am. Short of growing my own food and skiing outside my back door, it would be hard to ski in a "greener" way without lifts. Skiing without grooming would definitely be "greener"...in more ways than one, since a lot fewer people would show up.
post #7 of 9
Sure it's naive to belive in all this marketing stuff...
but I was not thinking about all the issues involved in the ski industry.

I was just thinking about the sking, on the slopes. And if there is a technology to make snow and run lifts that is not based on fossil fuels, great, it should be used, probably will prove cheaper in the future.

I never heard about electric snowcats ore electric groomer "trucks"... but that would be as nice as eletric cars... but then there is the oil lobby... etc...

But anyway, I know how "not green" sking can be considering all the issues you guys listed above and many others...
I'm just an example of it, once the closest ski resort to São Paulo, where I live, is about 1500 miles flying. And I would never give up any ski trip just to save CO2. (and I could go surf driving a little more than 35 miles from home)

I also don't think it is fair to blame skiers for this... but maybe, in the long term, ski will be a sport that is practised in much less places than it is now....

but that would be subject for another thread.

ps: I will suggest the Northeast resorts to use brazilian sugar cane ethanol, efficient and not that polluter
post #8 of 9
Oil dropped under 50 bucks a barrel. Regular gas is under 2 bucks a gallon. That's GREAT for me since I drive three hours to the ski area.

So when are the airlines going to lower fares and let folks bring skis free again. Wait, I think I know the answer to that..




Never
post #9 of 9
uh oh
please dont go into the global warming via CO2 emissions topic, because its just not true.

i agree with making resorts greener, however, not all resorts will go for this becuase of the high price of new technologies. Most resorts would rather expand and build more lifts and open more terrain than spend millions to be the gienea pig for new techologies to power lifts, which could translate to higher lift ticket prices and a more expensive resort in general.
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