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What are the Benefits and Liabilities of Twin Tip Skis outside of the park?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I am interested in learning about the benefits and liabilities of twin tip skis. I see that some twin tips are considered "big mountian" twin tips and that there also "powder" twin tips. I wonder if a twin tip would be a part of a quiver for a rider who does not want to launch into the air?

Here are some of my questions:

1) Are all twin tips designed for the main purpose of skiing backwards?

2) Are there twin tips benefits for a skier who will not be trying to ride or land going backwards?

3) Does the shorter effective length of the twin tip really mean that a 186 cm twin tip ski could actually feel like a much shorter ski? I can see how this would happen on groomers. Would they still feel like a 186 cm ski in deep snow on steep slopes?
post #2 of 19
liabilities? This post belongs over at TGR......
post #3 of 19
Benefits outside the park:

Backing up in deep snow or on very steep hard snow in tight spots.

Being able to take a whizz while skiing backwards, and consequently not having to stop skiing.
post #4 of 19
All twin tip skis I have tried seem to be more flexable and better in trees and glades than on groomers. The bindings will mount more towards the middle of the ski opposed to the back which may help from getting out of control in bumps and trees and what no
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Benefits outside the park:

Backing up in deep snow or on very steep hard snow in tight spots.

Being able to take a whizz while skiing backwards, and consequently not having to stop skiing.

Never thought of that mud, now then, does it have to be a ful twin or is directional acceptable for this?
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by superlight View Post
... liabilities of twin tip skis

...
They are difficult to put skins onto.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Never thought of that mud, now then, does it have to be a ful twin or is directional acceptable for this?
Depends on snow conditions, terrain, and how good you are skiing switch while taking care of business.
post #8 of 19
Hmm, I understand. I would think the first couple of times, I should try it on a groomer....Directionals should be adequate.....
post #9 of 19
Yes , you can back up in powder but you cannot sink the tails into the snow on a steep powder slope so that you can get a straight start on the pitch. I knew some guys who tried using twin tips in a powder 8 contest and they were at a disadvantage because they had to start their runs sideways and hop into position instead of just pushing off and turning. An advantage is the rooster tail that you send up blinding everyone who is behind you. Whizzing might have the same effect! Two good reasons to blow past someone on twin tips.
post #10 of 19
there are inherant risks in whizzing going switch but I think it's just common courtesy to "point it down".......... (remember to thoroughly shake to prevent icing.... (any more questions? Please see my thread regarding proper way to piss in the woods from last season)
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by drock_rust View Post
All twin tip skis I have tried seem to be more flexable and better in trees and glades than on groomers. The bindings will mount more towards the middle of the ski opposed to the back which may help from getting out of control in bumps and trees and what no
the binding will mount where ever you want them too. to far center and they lose their playfulness in soft snow.

advantage - generally twin tips have a more round flex whether how stiff its is. this a desirable trait to ski off trail. also they help you billy goat in area if you should get stuck.

they do feel shorter. so much so that some skis are best bought in alot longer length than your other skis you have.

liability is that some models dont like to finish turns on groomer unless you steer them that way. I dont really care though cause I prefer in the fall line and fast. skins are not harder to hook up for the most part.
post #12 of 19
Advantages - the ability to slip backwards in tight spaces. Skiing backwards when teaching.

The disadvantages - Throws snow up behind you. It's hard to plant the tails when putting the skis after hiking up.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
If I can not demo a pair of twin tips, should I just add 10 cm and go a size larger?

Or do you keep the same size and get more maneuverability?
post #14 of 19
Well that depends on what you're looking for. I love my twins for tight places and steep stuff simply because the upturned tails allow one to wash the arse end out easier should you need to break turn radius and maneuver... Really it is all about which ski you're getting. A heavy, damp and stiff ski such as the Head Monster (semi twin) will ski a little longer than a softer and less damp ski such as the Public Enemy. You could probably go 10 cm longer if it is desirable, but like I said it's all about your personal balance between available size, intended purpose, sidecut, the width of the ski and it's overall characteristics versus what you're used to. That may have just consufed you more, but I hope it helped...
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by superlight View Post
If I can not demo a pair of twin tips, should I just add 10 cm and go a size larger?

Or do you keep the same size and get more maneuverability?
what are you planning on buying? what size are you other skis.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
DoWork,

Thanks for your reply. You did not confuse me even more. In fact, you confirmed what I thought was important.
post #17 of 19
Since you posted the same thing at TGR, I'm going to have to JONG you and say once again, "ROOSTER TAILS, FOOL!!!"

Yes, they ski shorter, or at least seem to. They are easier to get out a turn. They make skiing FUN again - at least that's my story. I sold mine last year, but am looking for a replacement pair. They make you more steezy too. Chaos probably skis them.
post #18 of 19
Now I know where those yellow stripes down the hill come from - Mudfoot and his reverskiwhizzing after a morning Vitamin B hit!
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post

Throws snow up behind you.
That's a disadvantage for somebody else.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What are the Benefits and Liabilities of Twin Tip Skis outside of the park?