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What can be classified as strong legs? - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post
This is a pretty rad pic of me killing it.
http://powerlifting.ru/content/photo...sy_2003/10.jpg
Did you really do a squat? As in all the way down, below parallel. Just having that weight on your shoulders is a feat, but I can't see from that picture a likely full squat. Still impressive.
post #32 of 47
We have some super strong people on this forum IMHO. I don't know how much skiing utility you get from the level of "super" strength" being discussed. Ski legs to me would be the ability to ski top to bottom with minimal stops repetitively. If you can do that for 5-6 hrs on a big mountain and throw in some bump runs for good measure, I would be more inclined to use this as a measure of posesing strong legs.
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post
No sir, this pic has been taken five years ago for instance.
And what I actually am asking you is whether these big weight squats and leg presses are really needed for skiing, freeride skiing of course, and whether I should continue improving my strength or the one I already have is sufficient?
If I were you, I wouldn't consider skiing until I could squat at least 730lbs. Keep it up, maybe you'll get there one day.
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut_hucker View Post
If I were you, I wouldn't consider skiing until I could squat at least 730lbs. Keep it up, maybe you'll get there one day.
I disaree. I'm quite sure he could ski if he squats 700lbs.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Did you really do a squat? As in all the way down, below parallel. Just having that weight on your shoulders is a feat, but I can't see from that picture a likely full squat. Still impressive.
post #36 of 47
I call BS, a powerlifter who could squat over 600 to legal depth would never waste their training time/recovery on leg press. Good troll though
post #37 of 47
This ^^^ Or ask if they're strong enough (or flexible enough) for skiing!

OTOH, I would disagree with a lot of you guys because I think "endurance" over strength seems pretty overrated, unless your talking about someone who's pretty damn strong! From personal experience, getting stronger makes a huge difference in skiing -- when I'm going most of the day at about 25 to 30 percent of max effort versus 60 to 75percent, endurance automatically goes WAAAY up. Of course, this means a lot more than getting quads strong for skiing.
post #38 of 47
There is no exercise that increases overall strength more than heavy squats, both from the standpoint that one requires core and ancillary strength the handle the weight as well as the unmatched release of GH. So, massively strong legs are a plus no matter what you do...naturally skiing, which is primarily leg activity, is no different.

Most, dare I say all, people who have large powerful legs also have high endurance, since in order to properly develope legs high intensity is a given. The amounts of lactic acid produced from a brutal leg workout are enough to make a 250lb bodybuilder puke....and most of these guys have a high tolerance to lactic acid.
post #39 of 47
A stronger muscle is a more enduring muscle. I believe that strong legs will help other aspects of an athlete's overall strength and conditioning. Muscular endurance is challenging to develop, so cheat and train for strength.
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
There is no exercise that increases overall strength more than heavy squats
Most, dare I say all, people who have large powerful legs also have high endurance, since in order to properly develope legs high intensity is a given. The amounts of lactic acid produced from a brutal leg workout are enough to make a 250lb bodybuilder puke....and most of these guys have a high tolerance to lactic acid.
Although I agree to a point , Heavy Squats are a necessity,deadlifts ,squat cleans,power cleans are also in the mix for overall strength.
Large powerful legs do not mean high endurance .It becomes immediately apparent when either a powerlifter or a high end bike guy comes into a Crossfit gym.
They tank spectacularly.
Their learning curve is much shorter,but they tank all the same.
Once we purge them of their meathead mentality(the powerlifter) they develop quickly into monsters.But before that all they can do is lift heavy things.
The bike guys have endurance but lack real strength.
post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
Although I agree to a point , Heavy Squats are a necessity,deadlifts ,squat cleans,power cleans are also in the mix for overall strength.
Large powerful legs do not mean high endurance .It becomes immediately apparent when either a powerlifter or a high end bike guy comes into a Crossfit gym.
They tank spectacularly.
Their learning curve is much shorter,but they tank all the same.
Once we purge them of their meathead mentality(the powerlifter) they develop quickly into monsters.But before that all they can do is lift heavy things.
The bike guys have endurance but lack real strength.
Large muscles can be a good base from which to build. Skiing will give you muscular endurance and large muscles can more easily adapt to specific demands.

Lobo, what do you find to be effective when training for muscular endurance - say legs, or even in general.
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
Although I agree to a point , Heavy Squats are a necessity,deadlifts ,squat cleans,power cleans are also in the mix for overall strength.
Large powerful legs do not mean high endurance .It becomes immediately apparent when either a powerlifter or a high end bike guy comes into a Crossfit gym.
They tank spectacularly.
Their learning curve is much shorter,but they tank all the same.
Once we purge them of their meathead mentality(the powerlifter) they develop quickly into monsters.But before that all they can do is lift heavy things.
The bike guys have endurance but lack real strength.
Well, I cant argue this since I have little to no experience with power-lifters, my sole exposure to monster weights are with bodybuilders, which in order to increase muscle size require heavy weights with repetitions (sometimes insane numbers), the conditioning is very different.
post #43 of 47
I am impressed at your strength but.... this is strength and balance:

http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Movie...all%20Jump.WMV

For more ski training strength/balance cool stuff look here:

http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Coolstuff.htm

If you can do stuff like this, I wouldn't worry about what you can squat. Also, spending time and money on advanced ski lessons will do more for your skiing than physical training. Especially at your level of strength and fitness.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonnyMo View Post
I am impressed at your strength but.... this is strength and balance:

http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Movie...all%20Jump.WMV

For more ski training strength/balance cool stuff look here:

http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Coolstuff.htm

If you can do stuff like this, I wouldn't worry about what you can squat. Also, spending time and money on advanced ski lessons will do more for your skiing than physical training. Especially at your level of strength and fitness.
There is no substitute for strength.
I've seen these videos before. Impressive,very cool,but a circus act none the less.
It will come in very handy when you ski Mt.SwissBall.
With that strength,If one works on mid-line stability as well ,there is no need for wobbly things under your feet.
http://ericcressey.com/unstable-ground-and
post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
.

Lobo, what do you find to be effective when training for muscular endurance - say legs, or even in general.
Paul
Body wht. stuff I'd say
Tabata Squats ,walking lunges & there variations.
With an empty bar,Jumping Squats.
post #46 of 47
makes sense
post #47 of 47
That swiss ball stuff is an awesome skill for sure, but I don't see how it transfers to anything other than jumping on swiss balls.

For muscle endurance, try 20 rep breathing squat sets. Load up a bar with what you think your 10 rep max is, then force yourself through 20 reps of squats, taking as much time as you need (hench the 'breathing') without re-racking the bar. Big mental and physical battle, your legs will be screaming. Also as lobo says tabatas, box jumps, lots of diff CF workouts (fight gone bad is a good one).
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