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How do you build a quiver?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Do you base it on length, width or turn radius?

What characteristics do you base your decision on?
post #2 of 27
You make it sound way more complicated than it is....


I want it


I buy it
post #3 of 27
Two factors:

Snow Conditions

Terrain

considerations like length, width, and radius all factor in based on these two things.
post #4 of 27
Bargin Shopper here. I don't really care about what kind of ski it is, maybe that's weird. The last year or so I'll take 2-3 pairs to the MT and switch out every few hours. Keeps it interesting.
post #5 of 27
^^^^ I always change skis at lunchtime sometimes again around 2

Factor A=Utility. Each ski must have a specific and unique purpose that fills a user need. Examples are type of snow (powder, crud, bumps, hardpack), type of skiing (park, racing gs sg sl dh, carving, shortswing-different levels beginner, intermediate).

Factor B=Price. What's your budget? Can I afford another pair of skis?

Factor C=Need. What kind of ski would I use that I don't already have?

Factor D=Impulse. I'd love to have a pair of Goats because they look really cool, lots of folks like them. I might need them should we get a miracle dump or if take a trip out West. Seriously I really would like a pair, I've watched a few beat up pair by on eBay but factors A-C have kept me from pulling the trigger.
post #6 of 27
In my dreams, I build my quiver just like Rossi...

In reality I have to build around what I can afford, and by afford I mean, deciding if spending the money is worth having to explain to my wife why I need more ski gear...sad but true...
post #7 of 27
a) where you ski

b) skill level

c) personal preferences (speed, trees, groomers, etc).

I'm down to 2 skis now - Gotama's and Volkl AC50's. If I skied smaller hills, I'd add a narrow carver.
post #8 of 27
I'm with JayPow.... I build mine based on conditions.

I've got one pair for early season and "groomer days".
I've got one pair for all soft snow days (left-over pow, spring, small powder days, etc).
I've got one pair for deep powder days (probably 8"+)

And in case anyone's wonder what those skis are:
186 Head Mojo 90s
185 Rossi Scratch Steeze
185 Praxis Powders
post #9 of 27
Quiver is built based on conditions(type of snow, steepness, etc.), turn radius and speed, and affordability.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Do you base it on length, width or turn radius?

What characteristics do you base your decision on?
I choose a ski that will excell in the conditions that are most common in my area and for the terrain that I prefer. This is the (OSQ) and I'll choose this one first. Then I'll build off of that ski and add a model or two for special circumstances according to how I prioritize them.

In my most recent quiver makeover, in the order of their importance................

I chose the Blizzi Argos as the centerpiece. This is the daily driver or the (OSQ). I expect decent groomer grip, excellent crud performance and good powder performance. This ski needs to be nimble enough for most off trail conditions up to a week after a storm. This is by far the most important choice to me.

2 nd ski chosen was the Fischer Watea 84. This ski needs to have good groomer performance, excellent manuverability in bumps and tight chutes, decent performance in shallow crud and powder. This choice needs decent hard snow grip but that's not a huge priority for me. This is the second most important choice.

3 rd ski chosen was the Dynastar Huge Trouble. This ski needs to have excellent performance in deep snow no matter if it's heavy or light. It needs to be good in thick or wind crusted snow (as on a windy storm day) and at least passable out of the deep snow.

4 th ski chosen was the Rossi S7. This ski fits the same niche as #3 but is an experiment in RCS to see if I like the genre. This was an "indulgence" I don't feel I need this ski, I just wanted to try it.

SJ
post #11 of 27
At this point I'm just building depth. I know what works for me, and have it, so I'm padding my reserves, as it is uncertain how long existing stocks will remain available.
post #12 of 27
Much like my bike collection. I collect what I want and what comes my way, new or used, some I picked up from spring cleaning junk pile. Skis I have practised tune-up on all summer. I now have skis of different length, material, cuts, age... looking forward to trying them all out and build my own opinion.
post #13 of 27
My quiver building is based around want due to the fact I am probably only going to see about 30 snow days this season but am already at 3 pairs (1 new, 1 nearly new) and have 2 coming later on..
post #14 of 27
My quiver has been growing over the last few years. For most of my life I got by with 1 or 2 pairs of skis, Usually slalom race skis with a few GSer's thrown in. I figured if I had a ski that would grip on icey moguls & ruts, I could get by in any other conditions. When different shapes started happening my quiver began to grow.

Presently I have more skis than I ever would've thought neccesary & it would be worse if I was racing competetively.

Volkl Racetiger RC's 173cm - For Nastar & the occasional GS. I still haven't found a true GS ski that I am comfortable on.

Volkl Racetiger WC SL's 160cm Race Stock. - For Slalom, & just ripping around when every thing is hard & slick.

Rossi Z11's 170cm. - These are kind of everyday go everywhere skis unless it's powder or real soft.

Scott Missions 178cm. - Powder, crud & soft snow.

Scott Missions 168cm. For AT. - Lightweight backcountry rig.

K2 Anti-Piste 181cm. - These are my newest edition & will be mounted with Barons for extra deep mornings & side/backcountry powder.

I have a snowboard somewhere too, for when I'm really bored.


JF
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Do you base it on length, width or turn radius?

What characteristics do you base your decision on?
First, you need an obsessive compulsive disorder.

I try to consider what skis would be ideal for the places I like to ski. Hard snow is great for race-like skinny skis, one GS & one SL would be ideal. Soft snow requires new age wide skis. Rockered or reverse camber, please. Since I don't always know what conditions will be found five days in advance, a versatile carver (Dynastar Contact 4X4) and a versatile 100mm wide all mountain ski (Fischer Watea 101) are good to travel with.

Current primary quiver;

183cm Blizzard Sigma S: Vist plate GS ski
172cm Dynastar Contact 4x4: all around firm snow
192cm Fischer Watea 101: all around soft & deep snow
186cm Volant Spatula: Super deep & soft snow tree ski

Notice, no midfats!


Michael
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
First, you need an obsessive compulsive disorder.
This is the centerpiece of MY collection.

After that, it's all easy: I ski both east and west, but far more in the east. So spread of carvers, and smaller spread of big mountain skis. Still pondering true powder/rockered/strange sidecut skis. Nothing in the middle (eg 70-85). Try to avoid redundancy except at extremes. Try to create double counts (BMS that can work as eastern pow). Breathe deeply and repeat until credit card company sends you cheerful announcements of impending doom. Change credit cards and start over...
post #17 of 27
Two scenario answer:

As a first time buyer I went for the most gee-wiz gadgetry I could find while still being right for the type of conditions I was going to be skiing. I paid no mind to any dimensions only that the skis were well received in all the reviews that I read and that they would do what I hoped to be doing with them. I also (contrary to what everyone was recommending) bought them above my level of skiing at the time so that after one season I would not feel that I needed a higher level ski.

Fast forward to now:

Now I buy skis to fill in all the gaps that the first skis above left open. I still pay attention to its intended use and its target level skier but now dimensions really seal the decision. Oh, and they have to be HEADs.
post #18 of 27
I decide which of these disciplines I want a ski for, and then figure out which specific ski would be best (and cheapest) for me:

SL
GS
SG
DH
Aerials
Moguls
Park
Crud buster (LP, for example)
Big mountain (XXL/Squad)
Something like a gotama (I don't really like that ski, but you know the category)
Spring AT (narrower waist)
Winter AT
Fun Shape (praxis/dp lotus/spat)

(from http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=74425&page=2)
post #19 of 27
How to build a quiver? easy.

New skis (like RossiSmash: I want it, I buy it)

Rock skis (former 'new' skis)

Older rock skis (you gotta have something to ski on in September )
post #20 of 27
I built mine by who I ski with...the guy who keeps saying, "you oughta try these new Atomics..." It started with the R:EX, then the M9, then the Crimsons...may be the Crimson Ti this year?
post #21 of 27
First I choose the best ski for the conditions I'll be skiing most, second I choose the best ski for the conditions I'd most like to ski. For me this is the same set of boards. Next a one ski quiver within my quiver for those days when I don't know what I'll be getting into. Then some other fun sticks for other fun stuff.

Price is a huge consideration. $250 was the most I paid for any of my skis. If I was being funded by a sweet sweet sugar mama, I think I'd build it in the same way but with multiple options in each catagory. As it is I'm starting to get the hairy eyeball from the salty mama

First and second: K2 Cabrawler
Third: K2 PE
Others: Bluehouse District, Volant V2 Chubb, Blizzard Mag SL, Atomic 9.28


Harry, gotta say I never pictured you on the Steeze Good on ya
post #22 of 27
How do I build a quiver?
Start with a bubble bath. No need for candles, because the light from the tv with the ski porn is just the right light............Ski porn and the right mood..........that can inspire a quiver!
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
How do I build a quiver?
Start with a bubble bath. No need for candles, because the light from the tv with the ski porn is just the right light............Ski porn and the right mood..........that can inspire a quiver!
This post is useless without pictures.
post #24 of 27
How do you build a quiver?

Step one: Buy another pair of skis
Step two: Keep your old skis
Step three: goto Step one

After a couple of years, you've got a quiver.

This has been another in a series of simple answers to simple questions.
post #25 of 27
I never demo skis anymore, but prefer to take the reverse approach. Find a good deal on a pair of skis either new, used or just leftovers. A deal that you just can't pass up, then, figure out why you need them in your quiver. It's pretty easy at first, but as you purchase more skis, it becomes more challenging.
Then ski them.
If you like them, you done well.
If you don't like them or you realize after skiing them that there is too much overlap in your quiver, you can pass them on to another Epic member for a great price. In many cases, it is around the same price to buy the ski and resell it than to demo a few pairs. Plus, you can make sure that they are properly tuned.
post #26 of 27
Another Phil thread - praying for snow to save the man.

Mostly I decide by how much of a filthy whore is in me - gear whore that is.

Depends on my mere purpose which factors I emphasize (terrain, snow conditions) - length, width, shape/sidecut, flex, camber/rocker, core, construction, weight, test reviews....
Haven't bought another hard pack dedicated ski for about 8 years now so turn radius was prolly less of a criterium recently.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Bargin Shopper here. I don't really care about what kind of ski it is, maybe that's weird. The last year or so I'll take 2-3 pairs to the MT and switch out every few hours. Keeps it interesting.
I switch my skis every few runs

I build what I have off of my needs. For freeskiing skis I go by radius and width.

And the occasional I want it I get it basis.
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