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Best Add on Hi-Beam lights for Visibility

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I need an add on (Hella Style) High Beam for my 2001 Jeep cherokee.

( i apologize if this isnt "ski" gear, but its ski related in the fact that im outfitting my jeep for trips to the mountain)

Every weekend i will make the trip from boston to Jay Peak VT, and i really would like to have the best visibility possible, (no deer/moose meetings) the drive will start at 7, and probably end at 1am/2am each time up, so i will need my lights the whole time.

the questions i have:

what are your experiences with add on lights?
Would it be easier to just replace my existing high beams?
Best Light to add for long distance lumination?
best light for a wide lumination?
Legality of these lights in MA, NH, and VT?

Ive heard that in some states these lights will get you a ticket... I'd like to avoid that.
post #2 of 22
XJ...my specialty.

This topic has been covered 100000000000000000000 times on all the XJ forums, you can get all the right vehicle specific answers at:

www.naxja.org
www.jeepforum.com
www.jeepsunlimited.com

But to put it briefly, without going to a true HID setup, you can swap out the lights for composite units that have replaceable bulbs rather than the sealed beam factory type. Then buy Silverstar bulbs....the strongest of which are the ones made for single bulb motorcycles, which fit and work on a car.

The next problem, is the wire harness, basically the headlights in the XJ do not get enough juice with the whimpy factory wires. The solution is to use the factory wires to instead activate a relay that then switches power on and off directly from the battery all with heavier gauge wires. You can do it yourself or buy a kit.
post #3 of 22
Now, suppose I don't want high intensity illumination, but I want low-down illumination that will

a) not cause direct reflection back to the eye in fog (not high beam)

b) highly contrast potholes up to 2-3 car lenghts in front (in clear or rainy conditions, fog obviously less)

c) offer wide field of illumination (enough to shine on the deer next the road too).

Any one set of lamps to do this? On a street car?
post #4 of 22
Comprex:

a) dichoric lenses, or amber lenses
b) same as above
c) that will depend on the optics of the lenses, and will have less to do with the bulbs themselves. With most modern cars the lights are composite and form fit molded so usually you are stuck with the optics of the lights as per the manufacturer made them. In that case your best bet is add on fog lights and aim them accordingly. The better more expensive units have superior optics and glass lenses.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
In that case your best bet is add on fog lights and aim them accordingly. The better more expensive units have superior optics and glass lenses.
Go on. Which?
post #6 of 22
Assuming you can still get appropriate illumination-----

what would you use to NOT blind either on coming or drivers in front of you in lower (that yours) vehicles??

Irks me to no end to have someone come from behind (when it is not prudent to pass or allow a pass) with what appears to be enough illumination to light up manhatten---or the alternative---come at me in the same situation.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
http://www.autopartsdeal.com/catalog...ep&md=Cherokee

best bet out of these 3 pages of lights....

cost doesnt matter as much as range and intensity
post #8 of 22
What is often the situation with retrofitted HID systems is that the light is dispersed rather than focused on the road because the optics used in factory HID lights, usually projectors, are very different than those in conventional lights. The net affect is that no one benefits. Oncoming traffic gets blinded and the driver has actually less illumination than with conventional lights.

I dont know which fog lights are currently considered the best for the buck. But there are actually forums dedicated to automotve lighting....these guys are serious hard core many of them lighting engineers and go deep ino the stuff and can give you much better answers than I. That being said, if its in your budget, you can buy true HID foglights, with the proper optics; that would be the current state of the art and the best.
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
to not blind other drivers id use my regular headlights.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
to not blind other drivers id use my regular headlights.
I am a little confused. So you do not want to touch your factory lighting, you just want to add auxilliary driving/fog lights? If so, in your case of an 01 XJ, the fog light provisions are on the lower front valence. There is actually a factory projector set that can fit there availabe for the European market XJs. The US models use a conventional optics lens.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
But there are actually forums dedicated to automotve lighting....these guys are serious hard core many of them lighting engineers and go deep ino the stuff and can give you much better answers than I.
No doubt, but the advantage of asking here is that I don't have to re-learn who's who and who's just spray.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
im getting dizzy from all this optics and lens talk. i feel like im getting new contacts. Look, im dumb. so talk to me like a fourth grader pleaase.

1. I'd like to have fog lights for snowy/foggy conditions.

2. i'd like to have super bright and wide high beams for when its past midnight and im on I91 north and its just my lane that i have to worry about. (not many other drivers going in my direction, and the highway is split at that point so i dont have to worry about oncoming traffic.)

3. i also want to have a normal driving light so that i wont have to blind other drivers.

best bets?

sorry for being retarded.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Go on. Which?
Head-lamps, obviously
post #14 of 22
Comprex, I understand, I just dont want to give you misinformation.

Scmentz: I havent messed around with my lights in some time. But the specifics, including model numbers as far as which housing and bulb to buy and where to get it at the lowest price can be found in the forums I cited above...its a regular topic. That being said what I said to do above will be your best bet. Get the fill in info from the XJ related forums.
post #15 of 22
Here is one site with step by step: http://www.jeepin.com/features/ipf/

BTW I hear good things about IPF lights as well.
post #16 of 22
If there are Euro versions of whatever US lights you wish to improve, they're most likely to provide better illumination.
post #17 of 22
Daniel Stern has the best lighting information, and he's very good about answering emails.
http://www.danielsternlighting.com/

Your jeep has 6054 rectangular lights, right? Consider European e-code headlights which will have a much better beam pattern, especially on low beam.
http://www.rallylights.com/detail.aspx?ID=744

Use the 60w/55w clear halogen bulbs that put out +50% more light due to better (costlier) gases inside the bulb plus more precise filament placement.

Or, 75w/70w bulbs or 85w/80w bulbs if you upgrade the wiring harness.

Never, ever use blue bulbs. Daniel Stern has a great rundown on the fallacy of blue bulbs.
post #18 of 22
Way TMI. 6" Yellow road lamps under the bumper w/ seperate fused switch, NAPA. Other drivers will heart you.
post #19 of 22

lights

Mounted clear driving lights on top of bumper on my Dodge trk, wired them in to my High Beams so they only come on when I switch to high bearms and off when on regular. Cebe lights, work great and don't blind anyone because I can flic on off easily.

Really come in handy up here for NOT hitting; Moosek, elk, deer and bear.
post #20 of 22
Pete, hope you used a relay there and didnt take the juice from the factory lights.
post #21 of 22
I think you have to get real about this. If your goal is to run some high powered wattage on those return trips from NE, great but take a good look at the traffic. One of the thing that struck me on my long trips to ME with a return to NJ later that night was that I'd never get to use enhanced lighting just due to traffic volume. I started looking at the "on vs off" time and it just wasn't worth the cost.

Same old, same old when it comes to fogs ... I've been following Car & Driver and R&T waiting for that breakthrough bulb for about forty years now. If you have to struggle with statistics to "quantify" if the thing works a little better; it prolally doesn't.

I'd just pop on a nice pair of auxillary lights with some additional wattage but I wouldn't go nuts. I did "limp" into NH one night on my driving lights when all of the main lamps burned out. Actually, 100K candle power ain't limping is it? More like the scorched bushes along the roadside .... Lucas Flamethrowers were pretty bright ...
post #22 of 22
One thing that I do in the last two cars that I've owned (Camry and Jeep GC) is that I have "modified" the low beam bulb. Both of these cars take a 9005 bulb in the low beam and 9006 bulb in the high beam. The high beam bulb is 10w higher and dpesn't have the silver coating on the front. It is brighter obviously. So what I do is buy a silverstar 9006 and grind down the two plastic tabs in the middle of the bulb, which allows me to plug it into the low beam and the visability is much better.

No you don't blind other drivers. The low beam is pointed low enough to not bother anyone. In fact in the two years that I have been doing it. I have never once been flashed by anyone thinking that they were my high beams.
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