New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski season blues :(

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Whats your take on the ski industry this year with the economy being in trouble? I think its going to be a tough year for the entire industry, especially the pricier resorts and gear.

For myself, unfortunately I am an employee of National City Bank, that just got purchased via a FED sponsored shotgun wedding by PNC. Layoff is likely imminent.

Saw my stock portfolio dump 70% of its worth over the past 6 months. My 401K is on life support and my mortgage isn't even in the green yet. Also had to get a new car after my Toyota blew an axle and the clutch and 4WD linkage went.

Skiing is probably going to be low on my priorities this season
First year in a decade I won't be purchasing a pass to somewhere. Going to wing it and probably get out when I can. I suppose a good number of skiers will be in similar situations.

Anyways, hows the job market in Colorado? It's pretty brutal everywhere else -- it's downright scary.
post #2 of 19
I'd say if you find yourself unemployed for the winter, try to find a ski area job. Doesn't pay bank money, but if banking is your gig it might be tough hunting right now. A ski area job will usually get you a pass and maybe some extra on snow time. Then again a ski area job may be just as hard to find as a banking job in these kind of times.

If you are creative enough, skiing can be a cheap sport. Hike for your turns or get a seasons at a smaller, cheaper hill.

Good luck with everything.
post #3 of 19
Dumpy is right, I got the best and cheapest skiing (amongst with spending more time with the kids and for myself) when I was out of a job several years ago. Get a job at a local hill if you're close to one.
post #4 of 19
Oddly enough, we're holding pace with last season's record pass sales. Good sign for us.
post #5 of 19
Skiing is one of the few activities I do where I don't think one iota about all the crap that is usually bouncing around in my head like money, lack of it, is my car working OK?, etc..

So feast of famine, I'm going skiing a couple times this year.

Search online for discount coupons to places where you can reach within a day trip. Ski shops also get coupons.

The drop in gas prices is most helpful because I'm 180 miles away from the closest ski areas.

That said, a job layoff did push my return to skiing back by a year. But I doubt it would prevent me from getting in a couple days now that I have the gear, know where to go, and have a few friends to help out if needed.
post #6 of 19
It'll be interesting to see how things play out this year.
Getting jobs at resorts isn't that easy right now, lots of
cutbacks and penny pinching around here
post #7 of 19
Hi,
Is it serious to look for a seasonal job in ski resort? What kind of jobs they can offer?

If I worked on hill, here in Latvia, I would earn about 4 times less than I'm earning now.
I hope the situation is different in US.
post #8 of 19
I have heard that resorts are revamping their rental gear with nicer stuff. They are expecting the economy/airline baggage fees to prevent people from buying/flying their own gear out. They expect more people to just rent gear and want to offer them more top of the line equipment.
Can anyone who works in a resorrt confirm this for me?
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewski180 View Post
I have heard that resorts are revamping their rental gear with nicer stuff. They are expecting the economy/airline baggage fees to prevent people from buying/flying their own gear out. They expect more people to just rent gear and want to offer them more top of the line equipment.
Can anyone who works in a resorrt confirm this for me?

I think that most rental shops are not revamping their fleets as the monetary investment would be staggering. After reading your post I called some folks I know who are in the rental business and they agreed that they will have similar fleets to previous years. In fact, a few of them reduced their fleet sizes as the expected traffic is down significantly.
post #10 of 19
I suspect that destination resorts will take the biggest hit. But how this affects day areas is anyone's guess.

I do know that the mountain manager at Alpine is psyched that he has far better job candidates this year.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewski180 View Post
I have heard that resorts are revamping their rental gear with nicer stuff. They are expecting the economy/airline baggage fees to prevent people from buying/flying their own gear out. They expect more people to just rent gear and want to offer them more top of the line equipment.
Can anyone who works in a resorrt confirm this for me?
Summit Daily recently had a story on resorts and big rental outlets in the area investing heavily in new, upper quality, gear for this season because of estimates it'll cost some folks as much as $250 extra to bring gear on the planes.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
I suspect that destination resorts will take the biggest hit. But how this affects day areas is anyone's guess.
I think you're right. Probably many of the locals are season pass holders.
post #13 of 19
I've had numerous invites to go cat skiing because "people have dropped out of our group." Unfortunately I don't have the coin either.

Revelstoke is apparently having financial issues.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
I think you're right. Probably many of the locals are season pass holders.
When I talk about day areas, I'm not necessarily talking about places that cater primarily to locals. By "destination resorts," I mean places with a village or other substantial slopeside lodging and food; "day areas" lack such amenities. For North Lake Tahoe, Squaw and Northstar fall in the first category, Alpine and Sugar Bowl in the latter. There's definitely a different cost basis and income structure between the two.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Got my termination notifiication today, as expected -- they always do it on Friday's Kind of ruins your weekend.

I am trying to look on the bright side of things, but honestly don't see any. The only thing positive I can make out of it is I am getting four months severance pay. It could have been worse --folks at Lehman Brothers didn't get a penny when their company folded.

CEO walks away with a nice golden parachute for totally destroying the company. The employees who made the company what it is get their a$$es split open.

Life goes on. I wish I could go out skiing this weekend to take my mind off it.

This sucks. End of rant.
post #16 of 19
MojoMan, Man I hate it for you...I faced the same deal about twenty years ago. I ended up being self employed and it has worked well up to now. But this current crisis has got me worried. What I do for a living is of course, directly tied to retail sales. I have been looking for a part time job to keep from dipping into savings. But I am scared that will only last for so long. I wish the best for you!!
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salomon View Post
MojoMan, Man I hate it for you...I faced the same deal about twenty years ago. I ended up being self employed and it has worked well up to now. But this current crisis has got me worried. What I do for a living is of course, directly tied to retail sales. I have been looking for a part time job to keep from dipping into savings. But I am scared that will only last for so long. I wish the best for you!!
Yep, sorry to hear this economy is creating issues for you. Get creative and do something that is good for you. I am in the same boat. Just waiting for Wells Fargo to close my division down in their acquisition of Wachovia.
post #18 of 19
Hey Mojoman,
One door closes another one opens. I know you feel crappy now but you will never know what is ahead of you. If you have another income in your household, it does make things a bit easier, especially if you live in an area with moderate standard of living.

The fact is: economy is really tough and layoffs are everywhere. So, at least you have that to blame. Think positive and move forward.

Like you said, 4 months of severance is quite rich for today's world, so you should be thankful for that. My wife is a engineering professional and she just got laid off (yup it's her turn this time) with a 14-week severance. The day after that happened, the company announced that they are done with severance payoff indefinitely. So, what should we make of that? It could be a blessing in disguise. Then again, maybe not, but we shouldn't dwell on that.

Best of luck!
post #19 of 19

Future

Quote:
Originally Posted by irafar View Post
Hi,
Is it serious to look for a seasonal job in ski resort? What kind of jobs they can offer?

If I worked on hill, here in Latvia, I would earn about 4 times less than I'm earning now.
I hope the situation is different in US.

Irafar, first welcome to Epic nice to have someone from Latvia.

USA jobs in skidom. generally speaking (unless you have some special apptitude, training or experience) most of the jobs are minimum wage or a little higher. Lift Ops, restaurants, etc. can sort of get you through the ski season. The real problem sometimes is lodging. Lodging can be ridiculously expensive in some towns.

Things are really slowing down here in the US and they are about to get worse. Personally I don't see how the ski resorts can escape this financial downturn. People are just flatly spending less money.

AGAIN Welcome to Epic.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion