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Junior Skis for adult woman

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Erroneously purchased a pair of junior girls skis (K2 Luv Bug) for my beginner wife at 146 Cm (she is 5' 2"). The tag at the swap said Intermediate ski but did not signify junior. As I did not know of the model-- I was not aware it was a junior. As I suspect no refunds to be had, can she use this ski? She is quite strong (muscular- works with a trainer, etc) and weighs about 130. It is basically a take a few lessons to see if you like the sport -- type of ski for her.

I think the shorter lengths of this model have a foam core, but I think I read somewhere that the year model I bought had a wookd core in that length (I think).

Is it back to the shop or can I ride out a few lessons without it hampering her progression and possibly her decision as to whether she wants to pursue the sport.

Thanks.
post #2 of 31
At 5'2" the 146 Luv Bug should be okay for a couple of days. I'm not sure when the Luv Bug went exclusively to foam core...hopefully a K2 rep can answer that for you. If she enjoys skiing, I would get her the Sweet Luv or True Luv. Get here a couple of half-day private lessons as well.
post #3 of 31
TTBOMK, the Luv Bug has never been made with a wood core. It's the girlie topsheet equivalent of whatever they're calling the beginner boys' ski.

To answer your question, no, she should not use that ski. It is not made for a 130-pounder who has adult muscles.

I'd suggest investing in a good pair of boots -- fitted for her -- and renting skis in the interim.
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshea93 View Post
Erroneously purchased a pair of junior girls skis (K2 Luv Bug) for my beginner wife at 146 Cm (she is 5' 2"). The tag at the swap said Intermediate ski but did not signify junior. As I did not know of the model-- I was not aware it was a junior. As I suspect no refunds to be had, can she use this ski? She is quite strong (muscular- works with a trainer, etc) and weighs about 130. It is basically a take a few lessons to see if you like the sport -- type of ski for her.

I think the shorter lengths of this model have a foam core, but I think I read somewhere that the year model I bought had a wookd core in that length (I think).

Is it back to the shop or can I ride out a few lessons without it hampering her progression and possibly her decision as to whether she wants to pursue the sport.

Thanks.
I would not be worried about the integrity of this ski if your wife has never skied before. In the first 2 or 3 lessons (3-5 days worth of skiing), she will not be applying much force to the ski. She will go thru wedge-turns to beginning christie turns at low speed. These turns do not require much integrity in the ski.

In fact, the lightness of the ski may help. Aspen is famous for using this type of ski to teach their 'direct-to-parallel' technique to beginner skiers.

If she likes the sport, get her a better ski later.

I definitely agree that the boots are the most important piece of gear to buy. If you can, find a qualified boot fitter (not some kid just out of school). Have the boot fitter align her legs (cuff cant, and side-to-side tilt). The other part of buying a boot that I strongly recommend is a custom foot-bed. I know it costs $$.

From a ski pro, whose taught this level of skier many times.
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
TTBOMK, the Luv Bug has never been made with a wood core. It's the girlie topsheet equivalent of whatever they're calling the beginner boys' ski.

To answer your question, no, she should not use that ski. It is not made for a 130-pounder who has adult muscles.

I'd suggest investing in a good pair of boots -- fitted for her -- and renting skis in the interim.
The "boy's" junior ski is called the Indy, which like the "girl's" Luv Bug is built with the all mountain junior ripper in mind. The ski is designed for kids who want one ski to do everything in any condition the mountain has to offer. They are not beginner skis.

Learners and novice skiers need a light-weight ski that they can easily maneuver. She might even progress a little quicker...besides, she'll have an easier time side stepping and steering her legs, as well as carrying her gear! They will be fine for a week. Then have her demo a few pairs of skis...her pro will be able to assist her with this.

As Alpinedad suggested, find a great boot fitter and get her a pair of boots. Go to READ FIRST: Ski Gear Advice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for advise on boots.
post #6 of 31
Buyer of Junior skis for spouse guy,
I agree with OlyLdy and GSS. I taught for seven years for Aspen/Snowmass in the adult division. Teaching never-evers with a light weight, short, new ski would make my day if your spouse showed up to my group. I hope she can get over the Junior marking on the ski. If not, Gorilla Tape is what I hear works well to cover that right on up.
Giddy Up!
Greg
post #7 of 31
OlyLady... that's called marketing.

Both the Indy and the Luv Bug are essentially rental bin skis. K2's junior twin tips -- Juvy, Missy, and Bad Seed -- are well made skis. But K2 hasn't made a quality kids' flat-tailed ski since they stopped making the wood core Apache Jr and repurposed the name for beginners' foam core skis.

I have no problem with teaching beginners on a lightweight, short ski. But a 120-pound adult is going to overwhelm that ski, if not immediately, then almost immediately.

It would make more sense to put these on eBay now -- while they're still new, just before the beginning of the ski season, and in time for the holidays -- so that the parent of a tween or young teen who's never skied can buy them as a present.

EDIT to add: And so I'm not just being a negative nellie, if you do want to purchase, Level Nine Sports has a bunch of good beginner's skis in the low 140cm range (and $80-130 range) that will permit her to grow a little more before growing out of them. Call them up if you have questions about which one would make sense.
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
OlyLady... that's called marketing.

Both the Indy and the Luv Bug are essentially rental bin skis. K2's junior twin tips -- Juvy, Missy, and Bad Seed -- are well made skis. But K2 hasn't made a quality kids' flat-tailed ski since they stopped making the wood core Apache Jr and repurposed the name for beginners' foam core skis.

I have no problem with teaching beginners on a lightweight, short ski. But a 120-pound adult is going to overwhelm that ski, if not immediately, then almost immediately.

It would make more sense to put these on eBay now -- while they're still new, just before the beginning of the ski season, and in time for the holidays -- so that the parent of a tween or young teen who's never skied can buy them as a present.

EDIT to add: And so I'm not just being a negative nellie, if you do want to purchase, Level Nine Sports has a bunch of good beginner's skis in the low 140cm range (and $80-130 range) that will permit her to grow a little more before growing out of them. Call them up if you have questions about which one would make sense.
I am confused. You have no problem with teaching beginners on a lightweight short ski. Just not this one. Hog wash. I think this ski would be just fine. It is a new "rental bin" ski, not several seasons old like she may have been subject to. We are trying to assist someone who is hoping that his spouse will get hooked. He should be concerned, as you pointed out, with boot fit. This ski thing makes no big deal. I am speaking from 16 years of teaching skiing and not from a desk or the side lines, not that that seems to matter much on line.
Greg
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
OlyLady... that's called marketing...

EDIT to add: And so I'm not just being a negative nellie, if you do want to purchase, Level Nine Sports has a bunch of good beginner's skis in the low 140cm range (and $80-130 range) that will permit her to grow a little more before growing out of them. Call them up if you have questions about which one would make sense.
Alpinedad...and what are your credentials?

I've worked in the design and marketing field for over 40 years, employed at worldwide firms including Apple Computer. I was involved with USSA junior racing for 15 years and I'm currently a USSA Certified Coach and Official. I've worked eight years in the retail snowsports industry and for many years I've been a full-time Alpine Pro, teaching all ages and ability levels...humm...

And...why would Jshea93 want to purchase equipment at Level Nine Sports? Enquiring minds "would like" to know.

Jshea93, your wife will be just fine on the Luv Bugs for a week. If she enjoys the sport after a couple of days, spend the time and get "good" boots. Purchase more appropriate skis at a later date.
post #10 of 31
People have different learning curves. If your wife is anything like my daughter, she would last 1/2 a day on the junior skis, and then be very frustrated.

The problem is your wife weighs 130 lbs, not 65 lbs.

Some people believe it is better when learning how to ski that the ski be incapable of delivering forces of appreciable magnitude via their edges to the snow, so that they don't get tripped up when they make mistakes. If you have a learner who expects the ski to deliver edge forces when they make the right moves and the ski just flexes with very little load that's not good for these people.

I also think it would be a lot easier to sell new skis than used skis.
post #11 of 31
Thread Starter 
We appear to have some differing opinions. I will add a few facts. She has skied a couple of times over the last ten years and she is a VERY VERY timid learner. She is signed up for a series of 6 weekly (weekday) lessons with a local moms group, along with half day tickets. She refuses to ski weekends due to concerns over crowds etc. She has no problem with the label, as she just wants a serviceable ski for the lessons. I am the one who is concerned, because I want a ski that will frustrate her the least, to increase the odds she will take to the sport...We have two young kids (6 & 7) who now LOVE the sport and want to spend every waking moment on the slopes. Mom doesn't want to miss out, even if it means undertaking an activity she previously found quite frightening, and we don't want her to.

I'm not sure the ski is worth much new on ebay either, as they appear for sale flat for as low as 89-- but with the binding (which appears to be an adult binding-- but I don't know that for a fact), you never know. Resale is not a huge concern, as we didn't pay much for it to start. Still, you never like to throw money away, particularly these days. Bottom line, I am more concerned with her enjoyment than eating the price of the ski.

My daughter, age 7, is 55 lbs and progressing quickly. While I could hold it for her, I fear that by the time she can handle the length it will not be enough ski for her. She is already eyeing up racing lessons and equipment. My 6 yo son is a mini bump fiend and would not be caught dead on a girls' ski.

Thanks
post #12 of 31
FYI: jr skis are made for JR bindings that have shorter screws, So if you put an adult binding on a JR ski the screws might be too long.

Jr bindings are made for Jr boots so will not work either.

just talk to the shop where you buy the bindings from about this too.

Might be easy, safer to re-sell the kids skis, buy boots that fit and she likes, and rent skis. If she likes skiing, then as she gets better, she can demo/buy/rent skis that are right for both her and conditions.
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshea93 View Post
...She has skied a couple of times over the last ten years and she is a VERY VERY timid learner. She is signed up for a series of 6 weekly (weekday) lessons with a local moms group, along with half day tickets. She refuses to ski weekends due to concerns over crowds etc. She has no problem with the label, as she just wants a serviceable ski for the lessons. I am the one who is concerned, because I want a ski that will frustrate her the least, to increase the odds she will take to the sport...

I'm not sure the ski is worth much new on ebay either, as they appear for sale flat for as low as 89-- but with the binding (which appears to be an adult binding-- but I don't know that for a fact), you never know. Resale is not a huge concern, as we didn't pay much for it to start. Still, you never like to throw money away, particularly these days. Bottom line, I am more concerned with her enjoyment than eating the price of the ski...

Thanks
Even more reasons to keep the ski! I have taught many women that are VERY, VERY timid and/or frightened. She will be primarily using rotary movements, turning her legs and feet, steering her skis on a flat ski. I am convinced that the Luv Bug will be fine for a couple of days.

NOTE: People that are VERY timid are usually more comfortable in a one-on-one lesson...just a thought.

Is she open to boot shopping?
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshea93 View Post
...I'm not sure the ski is worth much new on ebay either, as they appear for sale flat for as low as 89-- but with the binding (which appears to be an adult binding-- but I don't know that for a fact), you never know. Resale is not a huge concern, as we didn't pay much for it to start. Still, you never like to throw money away, particularly these days. Bottom line, I am more concerned with her enjoyment than eating the price of the ski...
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
FYI: jr skis are made for JR bindings that have shorter screws, So if you put an adult binding on a JR ski the screws might be too long.

Jr bindings are made for Jr boots so will not work either.

just talk to the shop where you buy the bindings from about this too.

Might be easy, safer to re-sell the kids skis, buy boots that fit and she likes, and rent skis. If she likes skiing, then as she gets better, she can demo/buy/rent skis that are right for both her and conditions.

It appears that the skis have already been mounted...probably with a binding with a DIN range between four and 12. At 146 cm, we are not talking about a young child's ski. Even the Marker entry-level junior binding with a DIN range between two and seven has a skiers weight range between 53 and 165 lbs. mntlion, as you know, many women, including myself prefer junior boots. I'm currently in the Fischer Soma WC Junior 100...love them. As mntion suggested, "buy boots that fit and she likes, [and maybe] rent skis. If she likes skiing, then as she gets better, she can demo/buy/rent skis that are right for both her and conditions". It's time we move on! Jshea93, whatever you decide will be just fine.

post #15 of 31
FWIW, I skied on a pair of Fischer RC4 Junior skis for a couple of seasons, and they held up very well.

I'm 6'5" and 280 lbs.
post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
Alpinedad...and what are your credentials?
I'm the father of three young skiers who has exhaustively researched the product lines of all the major players in the market. I put my money where my mouth is -- my garage currently houses seven different pairs of K2 junior skis, none of them foam core. And I'm a patroller at Alpine Meadows, over the hill from you.

I've been here for three years. A couple of years ago, I asked a related question. The most informative answer I got bears directly on this issue:
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
The biggest factor is that 1 st and 2 nd price point Jr. skis are cheaply built. It doesn't matter what brand name is on them. 95% of the time they are injected foam with very little structure. These are what we call "squirt" skis. Skis of this type are not suitable for an Adult. This is not a close call or a "maybe" sort of thing.....just not the right thing.....period.


Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
And...why would Jshea93 want to purchase equipment at Level Nine Sports? Enquiring minds "would like" to know.
Because they have great prices on skis that meet the discussed criteria. It so happens that I have been trying to help a friend who has a little more skiing experience, but has similar height and weight as the OP's wife, look for a better pair of skis. During my research, I noticed how many good and reasonably priced options Level Nine has in stock. I figured I'd share that research.

To the extent that you're intending to insinuate that I have a stake of some sort in Level Nine, well... I'm a lawyer in the Bay Area and patroller at Alpine. My sole relationship with this Utah-based company is as a satisfied customer.

We don't know what the OP paid for these skis, but given the K2 premium, I'd think that he wouldn't want to think of them as disposable, but instead, to resell them new. Then he can either rent for a few days, or buy disposable skis with more headroom for growth. And he can put the difference towards the most important piece of equipment: a pair of good boots that fit her.
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
TTBOMK, the Luv Bug has never been made with a wood core. It's the girlie topsheet equivalent of whatever they're calling the beginner boys' ski.
I found this spec for the Luv Bug at 'Bob Wards': BobWards.com - K2 Youth Luv Bug Skis

Wood Core
*only in sizes 146 and 153
A fir or fir/aspen core is used for its inherent strength, durability, and energy. A wood core, instead of foam, makes the ski more lively and responsive.


If BobWard got it right; it looks like you have a wood core ski!!!. This is for last years model, but I assume that what you bought.

Also the K2 specs for the Luv Bug (from the K2 site) shows an unmounted weight as 2010 grams for a pair. The 'Sweet Luv', that IS a woman's recreational ski weighs in at 2000 grams.

From all this, I figure you have a ski that is equivalent to the Sweet Luv.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
I'm the father of three young skiers who has exhaustively researched the product lines of all the major players in the market.
My two kids learned how to ski at the age of two and my son became a USSA Nor-Am, International level competitor.

Quote:
I've been here for three years. A couple of years ago, I asked a related question. The most informative answer I got bears directly on this issue:
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim
The biggest factor is that 1 st and 2 nd price point Jr. skis are cheaply built. It doesn't matter what brand name is on them. 95% of the time they are injected foam with very little structure. These are what we call "squirt" skis. Skis of this type are not suitable for an Adult. This is not a close call or a "maybe" sort of thing.....just not the right thing.....period.
We're talking about a VERY, VERY timid women who will only be using the Luv Bugs for about a week.

Quote:
To the extent that you're intending to insinuate that I have a stake of some sort in Level Nine, well... I'm a lawyer in the Bay Area and patroller at Alpine. My sole relationship with this Utah-based company is as a satisfied customer.
I wasn't insinuating that you had a stake in Level Nine. I just think that it might be more appropriate if they purchased equipment from one of their local ski shops, where they could discuss equipment differences with snowsports experts in-person.

Quote:
We don't know what the OP paid for these skis, but given the K2 premium, I'd think that he wouldn't want to think of them as disposable, but instead, to resell them new.
Quote:
Resale is not a huge concern, as we didn't pay much for it to start. Still, you never like to throw money away, particularly these days. Bottom line, I am more concerned with her enjoyment than eating the price of the ski.
The bindings are probably worth more than the skis...they can remount them on new skis at a later date. Enough said.
post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
Thanks all, I appreciate all of the time and effort put into the discussion. I will mull, contact the shop that submitted them to the ski patrol sponsored swap and see if we can't work out some sort of deal. If not, maybe ebay or maybe I'll let her ski them for a couple of days and work from there if we have to. We will also look into boots as the first priority. I know from my struggles to find the right boot upon returning to the sport last year (still trying to find the right boot- but we may have a winner) how hard that can be. Fortunately, her foot appears to much more "normal" than mine- to the extent any foot is normal!
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshea93 View Post
Thanks all, I appreciate all of the time and effort put into the discussion. I will mull, contact the shop that submitted them to the ski patrol sponsored swap and see if we can't work out some sort of deal. If not, maybe ebay or maybe I'll let her ski them for a couple of days and work from there if we have to. We will also look into boots as the first priority. I know from my struggles to find the right boot upon returning to the sport last year (still trying to find the right boot- but we may have a winner) how hard that can be. Fortunately, her foot appears to much more "normal" than mine- to the extent any foot is normal!
Amen!
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
My two kids learned how to ski at the age of two and my son became a USSA Nor-Am, International level competitor.
Whatever. You win.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
Whatever. You win.
I didn't know there was suppose to be a winner...I'm sorry if I offended you. Take care...and happy sliiidin'
post #23 of 31

aplinedad, what about the wood core thing?

Just when this was getting fun. I think GSS had some valid info on the Luv Bug having a wood core perhaps more than just talking to his kids with a garage full of K2 skis. Why did you choose to ignore that post? I know OLYLDY got in your face but do you agree or not agree that what GSS found on the ski might be valid in this case?

For sure, I am happy that the OP got what he wanted out of the post, but I am curious about your opinion on GSS's contribution.
Greg
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by GR8TRN View Post
Why did you choose to ignore that post? I know OLYLDY got in your face but do you agree or not agree that what GSS found on the ski might be valid in this case?

For sure, I am happy that the OP got what he wanted out of the post, but I am curious about your opinion on GSS's contribution.
Greg
I missed it, honestly.

GSS cites two sources: a reseller site for the wood core claim, and the K2 site for the weight. The reseller site is the only place I've seen that says any version of the Luv Bug boasts a wood core. K2's site certainly doesn't. In light of the fact that the reseller's site also claims that the wood core is present in the 153 Luv Bug -- a size that K2 apparently never built -- it appears that the reseller site's information may be less than perfectly reliable.

To clarify my earlier point, it's not that foam core skis are necessarily bad. But K2s junior foam cores are cheaply made and don't hold a candle to their wood core junior skis. K2 apparently has decided that there isn't enough of a market for quality junior skis that aren't twin tipped. That may be a reasonable assessment of today's market. But it also means that I won't buy their flat tailed skis for my kids.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
I missed it, honestly.

GSS cites two sources: a reseller site for the wood core claim, and the K2 site for the weight. The reseller site is the only place I've seen that says any version of the Luv Bug boasts a wood core. K2's site certainly doesn't. In light of the fact that the reseller's site also claims that the wood core is present in the 153 Luv Bug -- a size that K2 apparently never built -- it appears that the reseller site's information may be less than perfectly reliable.

To clarify my earlier point, it's not that foam core skis are necessarily bad. But K2s junior foam cores are cheaply made and don't hold a candle to their wood core junior skis. K2 apparently has decided that there isn't enough of a market for quality junior skis that aren't twin tipped. That may be a reasonable assessment of today's market. But it also means that I won't buy their flat tailed skis for my kids.
Thanks AD,
I did find in a simple search on the ski that there are both answers, foam and wood, on multiple reseller sites. It is interesting still that you are not against foam now. Does it matter it the K2 Luv Bug is using a Torsion Box contruction to "squirt" the foam into? All the information I found referenced the Torsion Box.
I know no one cares anymore, but I don't think OP needed to worry about the ski so much. 145+ cm new ski, 130 pound, 62 inch tall, novice, timid skier would be fine, me thinks.
Greg
post #26 of 31
Just a follow-up on the source for the wood cored Luv Bug.

It appears that K2 made the 2007 model in 146 and 153 with wood in the core. For 2008 they only go to 146, and it is foam.

See the 8 additional site links that list the 146/153 as wood core. Even if BobWard got it wrong, I don't think that these additional 8 sources could also have the same incorrect info.

Intermountain Traders
Buckmans.com
Skis.com
Snowrental.com
365adventure.com
Al's Ski Equipment
Skiessentials.com
Kidsskiequipment.com

post #27 of 31
FWIW, i skied on my son's outgrown jr. skis for a couple of years when times were lean. I was a pretty decent skier and had no problem. i am 5'5" and was 115 lbs.

As you know and have been advised, it's the boots that count. A woman who is timid and not skiing hard will have her feet get cold easily. Also, if she's in sloppy rental boots, rotary movements will be harder to execute and more likely to cause frustration than limp skis. Keep the skis until they don't work and get the boots as soon as you can.

Especially since encouraging her to love the sport is your goal rather than getting her to be a fabulous skier in as short a time as possible.

She probably wouldn't notice the difference for one week's lessons between skis, but she sure would see the difference in boots in one hour.

I have absolutely no credentials except volunteer teaching adaptive skiing to lots of people more timid than your wife.
post #28 of 31
Thread Starter 
I appreciate all the discussion. As they say, the more you know... Anyway, the 146 (with what I have confirmed are adult tyrolias) was for sale right next to the same ski/binding in a 153 (which it appears to be length they no longer make). The ticket (supplied by the shop that provided the equipment to the swap) made no mention of junior so I sense this was an intentional marketing ploy of sorts. While that irks me a bit, we'll just have to move forward. Shame on me for not recognizing a junior ski.

I can't seem to recall at the moment the graphics, so can't confirm whether it might be the 07 model (which some sites have suggested is wood core) and the 08 model (which appears to be foam only). I know it is not the 09 model. Interestingly, I seem to think it was the 08 model (from the spotty recollection of the graphics), and thus foam, but I thought they stopped making the 153 after 07 (which would be confusing because it was next to a 153 identical ski/binding). Who knows, forward we must move. I am tempted to let her give them a try for a few days and see how she fairs, and maybe get some advice from the instructors at the mountain. I don't know about the adult instructors, but I have been very impressed with some of the instructors who have taught my kids in the youth season programs. They have been most helpful with suggestions re: clothing, equipment, etc.

Thanks again to all who contributed.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshea93 View Post
I appreciate all the discussion. As they say, the more you know... Anyway, the 146 (with what I have confirmed are adult tyrolias) was for sale right next to the same ski/binding in a 153 (which it appears to be length they no longer make). The ticket (supplied by the shop that provided the equipment to the swap) made no mention of junior so I sense this was an intentional marketing ploy of sorts. While that irks me a bit, we'll just have to move forward. Shame on me for not recognizing a junior ski.

I can't seem to recall at the moment the graphics, so can't confirm whether it might be the 07 model (which some sites have suggested is wood core) and the 08 model (which appears to be foam only). I know it is not the 09 model. Interestingly, I seem to think it was the 08 model (from the spotty recollection of the graphics), and thus foam, but I thought they stopped making the 153 after 07 (which would be confusing because it was next to a 153 identical ski/binding). Who knows, forward we must move. I am tempted to let her give them a try for a few days and see how she fairs, and maybe get some advice from the instructors at the mountain. I don't know about the adult instructors, but I have been very impressed with some of the instructors who have taught my kids in the youth season programs. They have been most helpful with suggestions re: clothing, equipment, etc.

Thanks again to all who contributed.
That's great news. If the graphics were the same as the 153, I'm convinced you have a wood core. As a final note, I suggest you read the thread Ski Design - Is Wood Better? Many people, including SierraJim feel it doesn't really matter what the core is made of. Your wife will be just fine on the Luv Bugs. As a final, final note, in my adult skiing career I have also skied on a junior ski...as I recall, they were lots of fun. Have a great season and keep us posted (no pun intended) on your wife's progress.
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
At 5'2" the 146 Luv Bug should be okay for a couple of days...
Return them (or sell as new) or sell used with a few days on them?? I'd cut my losses. Rent her skis until she is skilled enough for an adult set.
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