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Coming back to skiing, need help

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
So I am returning to skiing after a couple years off. I would describe myself as an aggressive intermediate, but that was before I stopped. I'm just wondering how I should approach the mountain - to just take the tram up (snowbird) and head down, seeing what's left of my technique / skill? Or would I be better off getting a couple private lessons to help me brush up? If there are any instructors out there, what has your experience been in this type of situation?
post #2 of 26
While not the expert here I would probably go the route of doing an afternoon private lesson. Ski the morning to get your legs back under you and get an idea of where you need some help then head into the private with some questions. Welcome back!
post #3 of 26
Depending on how many years it has been, make sure you demo modern equipment appropriate for the conditions of the day and take a half or full day private lesson with a highly qualified Cert III pro that you feel comfortable with.
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
The private lesson idea sounds like good advice. I have a pair of watea 94's I'm excited to demo, and hopefully they won't be too overpowering.
post #5 of 26
While I agree that taking lessons is good for everyone, IMO skiing is like riding a bike, you never forget how to do it. I'm sure you'll pick up pretty much where you left off.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jameski View Post
While I agree that taking lessons is good for everyone, IMO skiing is like riding a bike, you never forget how to do it. I'm sure you'll pick up pretty much where you left off.
That's kind of why I thought an afternoon lesson after seeing how he's doing would be good. He can use it to improve skills either way.
post #7 of 26
Just a thought, but if you wear yourself out skiing cut up powder or crud all morning, you won't get much out of an afternoon lesson the same day.

I would lean toward a few easy warm-up runs, & then get in a lesson while you still have some energy.

JF
post #8 of 26
If you could ski back then you should be able to ski now.... But, how long has it ("a few years") been? Gear has changed quite a bit in the past 10 years. The techniques used to turn have also changed quite a bit with the advent of shaped skis. Start with a run or two down a green then decide how to spend the rest of the day. Last time I checked it was pretty easy to get an intermediate private lesson on short notice at most places. Not much reason not to take a lesson if you have the time, money, and energy.
post #9 of 26
I was away for 18 years. When I came back, it was on 30 year old gear, with a pair of cobbled together Frankenboots. I was back up to speed by the third day of the first season, allowing for some degradation due to age. Never took a lesson. That was five years ago. I finally got some new boots and skis last spring. If I had it to do over, I'd get the new boots about 4 years sooner and the skis about six months later than I did, and I'd try to be in better shape.

Get in shape and a two year layoff oughta be a piece o' cake.
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ya, seeing as how a private lesson will run me anywhere between $300 and $600 @ the bird, I'm leaning towards the whole "like riding a bike" philosophy. I would love to go to a camp or something in the future though, and definitely understand the value of instruction at ANY level.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Well, this morning I took the plunge...or drop in, I should say. When I stepped into the tram dock, I saw the sign saying "experts only", and felt a twinge of apprehension - but there was no turning back. I'm happy to report that the "like a bike" philosophy was true, at least for me. I'm not saying it was exceptionally pretty or graceful, but I was able to handle all of the terrain without any difficulty, and had a blast on the Watea 94's. It's good to be back!
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmorgan View Post
Well, this morning I took the plunge...or drop in, I should say. When I stepped into the tram dock, I saw the sign saying "experts only", and felt a twinge of apprehension - but there was no turning back. I'm happy to report that the "like a bike" philosophy was true, at least for me. I'm not saying it was excptionally pretty or graceful, but I was able to handle all of the terrain without any difficulty, and had a blast on the Watea 94's. It's good to be back!
That's terrific...good to hear it worked out for you!
Have fun sliiidin'
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmorgan View Post
I'm happy to report that the "like a bike" philosophy was true, at least for me.
Wicked.
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
so while we're on the topic of my skiing adventures today, here's another question. I got some rental boots today (I know I know...don't worry, mine are on the way) and the dude fitted me for a 28. I normally wear a size 11 shoe. Did these rental 28's work for me just because they've been so incredibly packed out? Or would a 28 really be my ideal size? BTW, the demo boots were Nordica.
post #15 of 26
Your ski boot size will almost always be a lot smaller than your street shoe size. I run in Asics running shoes (which run smaller than marked) at 10.5. My Tecnica Diablo Magnesiums are 25.5, or a size 7.5. I should say that this is a little extreme and that my toenails are only now about recovered from last season. (Just in time.)
post #16 of 26
My shoe size is 11.5 and my ski boots are 28.5. You were in the right size boot.
post #17 of 26
I wear a size 12 shoe and ski in a 27. You probably don't need that snug a fit but a 28 is probably a generous fit. Get a bootfitter
post #18 of 26
Another data point: My foot measures 11.5 , but my Dobermans are size 8 (26.5 Mondo).

While I can't predict that downsizing three and a half sizes is going to be right for you,
sKi boots are supposed to be snug; if you buy boots on the small side it's easy for a bootfitter to expand the shell in a few strategic places to make them fit perfectly. If you start out with too large a shell, all the bootfitter can do is try to cram in some soft crap to take up volume and the fit is not anywhere near as precise.

Work with an experienced bootfitter. The guy at the rental counter is not likely to be an experienced bootfitter. Don't choose your size on the basis of his recomendation, and bear in mind that the size will vary by brand and model.

Really, go find a bootfitter. Feet are complex oddly shaped things that vary greatly from person to person. Thinking you can boil it down to a single number (e.g. 28) is ridiculous, and anybody who thinks they can pick a size for you over the interwebs is blowing smoke.

Did I mention getting a bootfitter?
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmorgan View Post
Well, this morning I took the plunge...or drop in, I should say. When I stepped into the tram dock, I saw the sign saying "experts only", and felt a twinge of apprehension - but there was no turning back. I'm happy to report that the "like a bike" philosophy was true, at least for me. I'm not saying it was exceptionally pretty or graceful, but I was able to handle all of the terrain without any difficulty, and had a blast on the Watea 94's. It's good to be back!

Good to have you back!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmorgan View Post
so while we're on the topic of my skiing adventures today, here's another question. I got some rental boots today (I know I know...don't worry, mine are on the way) and the dude fitted me for a 28. I normally wear a size 11 shoe. Did these rental 28's work for me just because they've been so incredibly packed out? Or would a 28 really be my ideal size? BTW, the demo boots were Nordica.
As you will see by the replies I've quoted, there will be some varied measure of what size is right for you.
IMO it depends on foot shape and desired type of fit.
The largest I'd go is a comfort recreational fit which is a 2 finger shell fit.
Most in a good snug recreational fit will go with a smidge more than a 1 finger fit.

Some who prefer a Performance fit will recommend a zero fit.
Get thee to a boot fitter and find out what works for you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCantu View Post
My shoe size is 11.5 and my ski boots are 28.5. You were in the right size boot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierhj View Post
I wear a size 12 shoe and ski in a 27. You probably don't need that snug a fit but a 28 is probably a generous fit. Get a bootfitter
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Good to have you back!!!
As you will see by the replies I've quoted, there will be some varied measure of what size is right for you.
IMO it depends on foot shape and desired type of fit.
The largest I'd go is a comfort recreational fit which is a 2 finger shell fit.
Most in a good snug recreational fit will go with a smidge more than a 1 finger fit.

Some who prefer a Performance fit will recommend a zero fit.
Get thee to a boot fitter and find out what works for you!
Trekchick is right-on with this one! Good luck finding the "perfect" boot!
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
So here's an update on the boot situation - I went and tried on a pair of Krypton pros in a 28 which was comfortable, and the shop guy had my try on a 27, which was tight and hurt my toes slightly. He said that I should go with the 27 for sure, no question. Is this sound advice, or just a result of the whole "more pain, more precision" mentality?
post #22 of 26
By hurt do you mean really pain or just uncomfortable because your toes were right up into the liner? If it's the latter I'd say yep, go 27. The liner will pack out. I didn't listen to that advice for my first pair after coming back from a hiatus and 2 seasons later (about 65 days) I had to buy new boots because I was slopping all over. I went from a 25.5 to a 24.5 (I wear a women's size 9 dress shoe and a size 10 running shoe).
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmorgan View Post
So here's an update on the boot situation - I went and tried on a pair of Krypton pros in a 28 which was comfortable, and the shop guy had my try on a 27, which was tight and hurt my toes slightly. He said that I should go with the 27 for sure, no question. Is this sound advice, or just a result of the whole "more pain, more precision" mentality?
How much space is there behind your foot with the liner out? If it's over a cm or so, you should be fine.

If these boots come with intuition liners, they should give you something to help pack out the toe box when they mold them.
post #24 of 26
You can also grind or bootpress the toe box. The 27 is probably right, if the tech shell fit you properly.
JF
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sounds like the 27's are the way to go. I think the pain was due to my toes being right up/slightly bent against the toebox, but this whole grinding business sounds legit. Now I'm just debating between boots...which seems to be much harder.
post #26 of 26
Remember different models/brands of boots in the same size may shell fit differently, so be thorough & take your time.
JF
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