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Noob looking for skis

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
So here's the story. Skied last year for the first time since I was 8 and loved it. Went a couple more times to finish out the season at the local resort. By the end of the season I could handle the local black diamonds with some degree of comfort.

This year I'm planning on hitting the hill two or three times a month culminating in a trip out west early next year. I have a comfortable boot and I'm looking for a reasonable ski that I can grow into.

So far, I've heard good things about the Fischer XTR Sceneo. I'm also looking at the Dynamic VR02, and the K2 Four R. I know they are all lower-end, dated skis however that's where budget meets skill-level. I'm 5'10", 200lbs. Any advice is appreciated.

Thanks,
Mike
post #2 of 12
Welcome to Epic! Couple more pieces of info would help: What model are your boots? How long out west this time? Where do you ski locally? And what are you looking for in a ski? Do you like to do big fast turns or wiggle through bumps? Have you had lessons?

My hunch is that you would enjoy a groomer biased all terrain ski somewhere between 72 and 79 mm. There are a lot to choose from, many of last year's models are on sale new, would think about these brands given your weight and apparent home (non-west): Head, Volkl, Blizzard, Elan, Atomic, Dynastar. If you care more about the trip out west than your home base, you might shade toward the higher widths, say 78 to 84, and more what is called a midfat. If you like the park, or freeriding, you might add a couple of twin tips to the mix, but IMO, you'll learn faster early on with a directional ski. As far as price, you can find one or two year old new models of these at good prices, or clean used equipment/last year's demos are also a try. I would not go for any of the skis you listed, either because of dated designs or flexes that will not agree with your size.

Once you have thought through your priorities, suggest doing a search here for similar threads this fall from other newbies, or search for reviews/comments by name from guys like Dawgcatching, Sierra Jim, Whiteroom, Bob Peters, Ptex, plenty of others with experience in fitting up new skiers with equipment. Also suggest you think about taking some lessons and renting for a month or so, which will help you discover what you like...
post #3 of 12
Check out

www.levelninesports.com

They sell brand new stuff from last year...I just picked up a set of Head CSC's with Tryolia bindings for 180. I highly recommend them.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the quick responses guys! I'm at work now but I'll do a bit more homework tonight. It's unfortunate none of those options are viable since they were very reasonably priced.

To answer your questions, I'm in the St. Louis area and ski at a place called 'Hidden Valley'. It's all I've known but the experienced skiers I was with say it feels like chipped ice. It was also late in the season, Feb/March, so there was probably a lot of refreeze then. I'd rather be able to ski everywhere on the mountain than maintain high speeds.

I took formal beginner lessons then spent a few hours learning to ski 'the right way' from one of the experienced skiers mentioned above. He was nice enough to keep me learning until I could handle the blacks. I will definitely be skiing locally much more than out west so I guess the priority would be here however if there's a ski that can handle both I'd certainly like to hear about it.

As for the trip, I have a couple of options. A close friend lives in the Salt Lake City area and we have an open invitation there. Also, the guy that taught me is taking a long weekend in Colorado in Feb. Either way, it wouldn't be much more than a few days.

Again, thanks a lot guys.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
How would Salomon Scrambler 700s fare? I can get a great deal on them and they're 73 mids?

Thanks
post #6 of 12
Not so great at your weight.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the heads up! I could not find much info on that ski here (or anywhere else). Is it the flex that makes it unfit for my weight? I get the impression that something like a Vertigo G2 or K2 4500 is a bit stiffer but not quite as wide. Would stiffness trump width for someone my size on mostly groomed runs?

Again, thanks a lot for your time.

Mike
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilMikey View Post
Thanks for the heads up! I could not find much info on that ski here (or anywhere else). Is it the flex that makes it unfit for my weight?
Yes, unless you were to get them so long that you would find them objectionable in other ways.

Quote:
I get the impression that something like a Vertigo G2 or K2 4500 is a bit stiffer but not quite as wide.
That's true. These are, as you say, dated skis tho.

Quote:
Would stiffness trump width for someone my size on mostly groomed runs?
Yes, because you could then ski the ski shorter.

Look for something with 110mm+ tips, 170cmish length, up to 17m radius, with an 'intermediate' or 'intermediate-advanced' rating, don't fret over waist size.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Using that criteria, the Head C-120s are almost a perfect match. 114.8/68.5/98.7 and 16.7m radius. They're a new ski too. That looks like a winner to me.

Again, thanks for all of your help!
post #10 of 12
Best thing to do is demo for 2-3 days. Go to the biggest resort you can and find a ski shop very close to the slopes. Try different models every 1-2 runs. I did it at Whistler 8 years ago and love the boards I got, Canadian exchange rate was a plus.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilMikey View Post
I get the impression that something like a Vertigo G2 or K2 4500 is a bit stiffer but not quite as wide. Would stiffness trump width for someone my size on mostly groomed runs?
Yes, stiffness is more important than width on the groomed.

You could do a lot worse than finding a pair of inexpensive Völkl Vertigo G2s and using them for a season. It's a stable forgiving intermediate all-mountain ski that you can ride to the next level. If you want something newer, an Unlimited AC2 or AC20 is basically the same thing.

I wouldn't spend a ton of money on the "perfect" pair of skis at this point. If you've been bitten like it sounds like you have, your skills will improve pretty quickly and what's "too much ski" today might be the best thing for you in a year, and you will outgrow anything you think is perfect right now.

Some people will tell you to just rent for the next year, and that's not bad advice. My advice is to just buy something used for $200 or so, plan on using it for a year and then selling it for $100 - effectively a $100 seasonal rental. And don't get too wanked about whether it's "the one" or not. It isn't.

The main problem with renting is that it makes every trip to the local molehill twice as expensive. If it's $30 to get in some turns, you're more likely to do it than if you're looking at another $25 to rent boards.
post #12 of 12
I would definitely lean towards buying a used pair of higher quality skis than buying new trash. I agree with Walt's recommendation of the Volkl vertigos.

There's no reason why shouldn't be able to find a good, used pair of K2 Apache Recons, 174cm on ebay, etc. for around $350-$400. If someone wants a versatile, all-mountain ski that will hold up well when pushed hard, I usually always tell them to get the Recon.
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