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ESA Big Sky - The Big Lie

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
POWDER Magazine, this month Page 76. The Big Lie nice article on Big Sky. As usual the pictures are steep and gnarly - I am sending Nolo my chicken out notice tommorrow.

Check it out - all you experts - I'll watch.
post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
POWDER Magazine, this month Page 76. The Big Lie nice article on Big Sky. As usual the pictures are steep and gnarly - I am sending Nolo my chicken out notice tommorrow.

Check it out - all you experts - I'll watch.
The age old question, Chicken or egg?

You gotta do Big Sky ESA.......Mermer will get you out of the Yikes Zone~!
post #3 of 22
Consider the source, Pete: do you think Powdermag is going to emphasize the long, wide, empty, undulating blues that let you repeat that new movement you're trying to ingrain a zillion times, and learn that much better and faster than the norm? One of the reasons we love Big Sky for the Academy is because it's one of the best classrooms for the full spectrum of skiers in the world, period. Uncrowded. Wide. Long. All degrees of slope angles. Lots of variety. No one else on the run but you and your class.

It really is a ski area that needs to be skied to be believed and is just as bad-ass as you want it to be. Here's one of our students from last year ripping it up. Go Eric!
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post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Big Sky Lie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
The age old question, Chicken or egg?

You gotta do Big Sky ESA.......Mermer will get you out of the Yikes Zone~!
Did ya see the article. I'll ski it if you will but you go first. Where's Mermer when you/I/we need her. Yep read her book but even Mermer isn't getting me down that little slope.

Trekchick, I was justthere is no way I am cancelling out, way too macho for that. However I am going to find Mermer and go into deep consultation sessions 6 weeks out to overcome my inner fears as well as any sociological demands.

See ya on the side of Frozen 80degree pitch Lone Mt., did they call it Lone Mt. because you fall so damn far you'll be alone? Only HH knows for sure!

I'll tell you what, since you don't drink beer, you go ski those little slopes on Pages 76-80 and I will meet you in the My Very Best, Pete, Sayonara
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Did ya see the article. I'll ski it if you will but you go first. Where's Mermer when you/I/we need her. Yep read her book but even Mermer isn't getting me down that little slope.

Trekchick, I was justthere is no way I am cancelling out, way too macho for that. However I am going to find Mermer and go into deep consultation sessions 6 weeks out to overcome my inner fears as well as any sociological demands.

See ya on the side of Frozen 80degree pitch Lone Mt., did they call it Lone Mt. because you fall so damn far you'll be alone? Only HH knows for sure!

I'll tell you what, since you don't drink beer, you go ski those little slopes on Pages 76-80 and I will meet you in the My Very Best, Pete, Sayonara
I didn't see the article, and yea, I knew you were

I don't know about you, but I can't wait!!!!
post #6 of 22
Another recent article, which has cheered up the local realtors somewhat:
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/desti...-big-sky_N.htm
post #7 of 22
I can't understand the hype because I haven't skied there. I hope to do ESA there in March. Maybe then I'll appreciate it more.

When I did a near vertical run at JH, I thought my instructor was nuts. I got down it without killing myself.

When I skied OB at Alta, now that was stupid. I blindly slid down a natural path for about 100 feet. I couldn't see anything because my goggles were covered by the snow I had kicked up into the air because I kept kicking into the snow while I tried to stop myself from sliding. I bounced off of one tree slid another 50 feet and then was stopped by another tree. Another 150 feet after that was about a 200 foot drop. Ski patrol had to come rescue my stupid @$$ and they had to fish one of my skis out of a tree at the bottom. I never found my poles. Fortunately, they didn't have to fish me out of a tree or scrape my body off the rocks at the bottom.

Lived to ski another day. Ski anything to overcome your fears. Just make sure you ski INBOUNDS.

Regards,
Mark
post #8 of 22
The beauty of Big Sky is that it has both. Super gnarly and super easy. AND it's a very very beautiful mountain.
post #9 of 22
Big Sky has the full range of terrain. Pete you are certainly of a skill level that you will love the place, even if you choose to forgo the most difficult offerings.
post #10 of 22
Pete, you can handle it, you may not need the dual pass or want to ride the tram but there is plenty of other terrain to be skied into submission. We even get a 5 or is it 10 dollar discount with our ski pass to Lookout.
post #11 of 22
Been to Big Sky only 2 times. Awesome terrain, something for everyone. I had as much fun as I have had at any other destination resort. No crowd to speak of when I was there on the weekend in February. Very wide open runs, even for the groomers. Skiers and riders are actually friendly and courteous.

My only complaints are, like Telluride, it is a bit out-of-the way and traveling and lodging can be more expensive than usual. Its a pain to drive from Bozeman if you stay in the hotels. If you stay at the resort, it's uber pricey. Probably why its never really crowded. Then again, the location might be a positive, as if it was easy to get to it would probably be an out of control zoo.
post #12 of 22
Luckily, we get a killer deal on on-slope lodging with ESA.
post #13 of 22
I have had the pleasure of skiing Big Sky 3 times. The first was in February '05 during my first season skiing and I sucked but managed to ski the green runs by the Southern Comfort chair and had fun (except when it dumped 'cause I had skinny skis and no clue what to do in the deep stuff).

The next two times were better, especially last February when Rio showed us more of the mountain and I had a great lesson with Ursula Howland. There is a ton of great intermediate skiing at Big Sky that's challenging enough, not boring, with long runs. I haven't yet made it to Lone Peak but plan to next time (with Ursula or if I can ever attend ESA Big Sky).

There is something for everyone at Big Sky. And it's totally mellow there (read: nothing to do except ski and dine as there are great restaurants around), and my experience with ESA Stowe is that ESA puts people in appropriate groups and skis safely while challenging the students.

So . . . for any of you, at any level, on the fence, don't miss ESA Big Sky. Wish I could be there....
post #14 of 22
I envy you. I would give my right arm to live near the Montana/Wyoming border. Big Sky, Jackson Hole, and Targhee at your finger tips. I can't think of many other places a skier would like to be located. Rafting and hiking in the summer and skiing in the winter. Can't get much better than that.

If I win the lottery !

As far as Big Sky -- definately worth checking out at least once. Its as difficult as you want it to be. Plenty of mellow terrain if thats your thing. Most people associate BIg Sky with Lone Peak so they think its all gnarly and ungroomed everywhere.
post #15 of 22
I do have to add that after a storm, not many trails are groomed, and I've never seen grooming going on during the day, but hey, if groomed is what you want, why head to Montana?

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

Big Sky

Quote:
Originally Posted by weems View Post
The beauty of Big Sky is that it has both. Super gnarly and super easy. AND it's a very very beautiful mountain.
Just finished your book, good read, informative and enjoyed. I think some of the tips etc. are going to really help this year. Old guy still improving.
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 

Big Sku

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aceboympk View Post
I can't understand the hype because I haven't skied there. I hope to do ESA there in March. Maybe then I'll appreciate it more.

When I did a near vertical run at JH, I thought my instructor was nuts. I got down it without killing myself.

When I skied OB at Alta, now that was stupid. I blindly slid down a natural path for about 100 feet. I couldn't see anything because my goggles were covered by the snow I had kicked up into the air because I kept kicking into the snow while I tried to stop myself from sliding. I bounced off of one tree slid another 50 feet and then was stopped by another tree. Another 150 feet after that was about a 200 foot drop. Ski patrol had to come rescue my stupid @$$ and they had to fish one of my skis out of a tree at the bottom. I never found my poles. Fortunately, they didn't have to fish me out of a tree or scrape my body off the rocks at the bottom.

Lived to ski another day. Ski anything to overcome your fears. Just make sure you ski INBOUNDS.

Regards,
Mark
Mark, sorta sounds like the 100 yard slide I did off the backside of Headwall at Squaw. "Self arrest" techniques might be in order for you, I know I learned the techniques and they have saved my butt a couple times. Bob Peters did a good thread on self arrest about a year ago you could find it on search, had pics and everything. Hope you can make Big Sky.
post #18 of 22
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
POWDER Magazine, this month Page 76. The Big Lie nice article on Big Sky. As usual the pictures are steep and gnarly - I am sending Nolo my chicken out notice tommorrow.
Check it out - all you experts - I'll watch.
No need to chicken out at all. Big Sky has all sorts of terrain. It doesn't take a lot of effort, but it does take intent to get to the gnarly slopes. There's plenty of blue terrain and even some excellent green terrain. Actually, I spent quite a bit of time in the green terrain zone in between two trails in the trees looking for powder- even though it was pretty flat. (it's a sickness I have).

That beginner chair though - woo! It's so slow MadRiverGlen would probably give it an award. Almost enough time on that thing for two clove cigarettes and trust me, that takes some time!

Big Sky is easy to ski because generally everything comes back to one spot. I have a pretty good sense of the mtn in my mind even though I haven't spent much time there whereas I don't have that for a place like snowmass (which I think is a great place to ski too).
Really, place is great and having lunch at Moonlight Basin--woo hoo!!

Quote:
Did ya see the article. I'll ski it if you will but you go first. Where's Mermer when you/I/we need her. Yep read her book but even Mermer isn't getting me down that little slope. -Pete No Idaho
Mermeer...heh...heh...
Yah..she's a bit of a surprise!...if.. ya... want.... to know what it's like to be a girl...well...you might think you're one after a day with Mermeer! She's a lot of fun. Actually, a lot of her instruction I couldn't ethically print here....
She's not going to force march you over some gnarly trail though!....oh no...girls have their ways....hehe...
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
Consider the source, Pete: do you think Powdermag is going to emphasize the long, wide, empty, undulating blues that let you repeat that new movement you're trying to ingrain a zillion times, and learn that much better and faster than the norm? One of the reasons we love Big Sky for the Academy is because it's one of the best classrooms for the full spectrum of skiers in the world, period. Uncrowded. Wide. Long. All degrees of slope angles. Lots of variety. No one else on the run but you and your class.

It really is a ski area that needs to be skied to be believed and is just as bad-ass as you want it to be. Here's one of our students from last year ripping it up. Go Eric!
I'll ditto that Nolo!

As a coach at the 1st Big Sky ESA I really loved the variety of terrain that always provided me the optimum environment to set my group up for success. We alway were able to find a run just easy enough for something new or just challenging enough to stretch our skills the right amount. And having the place almost to ourselves made it easy to focus on making changes without being distracted by skier traffic. Big Sky is a great learning venue for any level skier, and as such especially caters to any of ESA's spectrum of campers.
ARC
post #21 of 22
Pete,
Many many years ago I managed to convince myself that vertical was just horizontal rotated by 90 degrees. It takes the fear out of skiing any slope, so long as you don't mind speed.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Lies

I guess I better tell the truth because I certainly didn't mean for this little thread to dissuade anyone from going to Big Sky. And I think some of your may have construed it that way. If this is true I am sorry because that was not my intent. The intent was some humor in relationship to the article (having never been to Big Sky).

As anyone can see Big Sky has some awesome intermediate cruisers and is not all Difficult Expert Terrain. This is my confession that yes I knew that. Just having a little fun.

Chaos rates me an Advanced skier who can't ski; moguls, powder (that ungroomed stuff), trees, steeps, crud or anything off piste. So obviously I can handle Big Sky's Groomers.

Appearing Sunday evening Pete No. Idaho will wear his Best Gaper Face, clothes and accessories - So he WILL be prepared for the 4 days ahead. Amen.

See ya all on the slopes - if you can keep up with me! Betcha I can slide faster than anyone. MASS IS FAST. (A very fast fat racer told me that so it must be true)
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