EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Expert Skiier, knows not a thing about gear.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Expert Skiier, knows not a thing about gear.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well hey guys, its my first post here. I'll gladly admit that i have much to learn yet about ski equipment. I've been skiing since i was 2, and I am currently 16 (I know, I know...). I am very skinny, I only weigh 95 lbs (about 105 geared up) and am 5'9". Basically, I've always just had whatever equipment came my way or whatever was on sale at the end of the season, more or less just because I've always thought equipment was overrated. But you guys are the experts on that. I know from the stickies that i should find a good fitting boot, but are there any specific skis that you guys would recommend? I am a very advanced skiier, and have been loving double blacks since i was 8. I do few high-speed S-turns, I typically am on moguls on very steep runs or cutting through trees, but I never do terrain parks. I ski in Northern California, Alpine Meadows is my favorite resort. I'm really looking for decent skis with a very good price. If you don't have specific boots or skis that come to mind, please give me all the guidance you can (including expected price?)

Thanks,
Eli
post #2 of 16
Hmmm - great fitting boots will tough because your feet are just going to keep getting bigger for a few more years. What skis do you have now? Do you like them? At your weight any expert skis may be too stiff - maybe rossi b2s would be good? How tight is your budget?
post #3 of 16
Welcome to Epic!

I guess I was about 5'6" and around 100 pounds when I was your age. I liked Bumps, Air and FAST in that order (Now it's FAST, Bump's and occasional Air). I always preferred a softer boot, especially in the bumps opposed to a stiffer racing boot. I only cranked down my top buckles tightly on the rare instances where I'm running gates. Other times I like some ankle flex, especially in the bumps.

But. I did crank them down a little for air cause I might need the extra support to muscle back up from a back seat landing
post #4 of 16
You sound exactly like me, but at 16, I was 5'10" and 115-120LBS. I also skiied on whatever my parents would get me/hand me downs/begging for xmas gifts.

Most of my skiing was next door at Northstar, but like you, I spent most of my time in bumps. Unfortunately, Northstar lacks great bump runs, but again, it's where my parents would take me. I was on "The Rapids" pretty much all day, but I still had fun, and The Rapids is actually one of the better bump runs in Tahoe (due to its length), but Northstar just doesn't have many other bump runs besides The Rapids.

Anyways, best of luck, my only advice is to buy something at least 1 season old. For budget reasons, find some performance skis from 2 seasons ago as they'll be about 30% their original list brand new. At your weight, just find a boot with good geometry. Since you're in the bumps and are a featherweight, you don't need the stiffest (often the most expensive) boot.

Good luck, I'm not as well versed on the gear as most members here so I'll let them comment, but at your weight, don't buy something too large/stiff for you.

When I was 16, I was skiing 196s but this was in the straight ski days. I moved to 180s and have been on them since, but I am buying 170s now. Don't get caught up in buying gear that was designed for adults twice your weight is my point...
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help guys and sorry for the delayed response. For the last 3 or so seasons I've been skiing on Dynastar Agyl's, 154cm(lol couldn't even remember brand name, had to go look). I have liked them (although in interest of full disclosure, I have nothing to compare them to). My budget isn't a strict dollar amount, but considering I make $8 an hour, I'm just looking for the cheapest decent equipment out there.

Really, my main concern is: will i even notice a difference if i spend a fair bit of money as opposed to just using my skis and some (nice) boots that i got since my grandpa stopped skiing? How so? Thanks again for the help.
post #6 of 16
Yes. Of course you will notice. It doesn't take an expert swordsman to notice the difference when using a broadsword, a katana and a foil. The skiing world has it's equivalent to all of these swords.

What ski to get depends on where you like to ski and where you want your ski to work the best, and where you will suffer with it. It's a compromise. It also depends on your technique. Do you prefer arc to arc carving on edge or do you enjoy the drifted turn more? Do you ski soft and deep snow more, or ice more? Do you make small turns or large, and if both would you prefer to pure-arc the large ones or the smaller ones? What speeds do you prefer to ski at most of the time? How important is it that the skis work well at the speeds you don't prefer?

Answer the above questions and I might be able to suggest a ski for you to try.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by eligray View Post
I typically am on moguls on very steep runs or cutting through trees, but I never do terrain parks. I ski in Northern California, Alpine Meadows is my favorite resort. I'm really looking for decent skis with a very good price.
Find a deal on a ski like the K2 Public Enemy, Rossi Scratch FS, Dynastar Trouble Maker, etc. I'd say a mid-160cm length. Doesn't matter if you ski park or not, a twintip will be the most versatile and cheapest option out there for you.


You should be able to find a new left-over ski for under $200, add a binding like a look PX Team and you have a set-up that will treat you right in the bumps, trees and all over the mountain for well under $300.
post #8 of 16
It's good that you're not thinking too hard about equipment details at this point. Most people on this board do, but that doesn't make us better skiers. That said, there's a large variety of ski types. I think the K2 PE recommendation is a good one. 169 would be my guess for your height and weight. I might even go for a 174 for growth. They ski short because of the twin tip. (I'm 5'11" and 165lbs, and use the 179s, for reference) Mount all the way back on the freeride line. (0 on the scale they have on the sidewall.)

One advantage of being such a lightweight is that you won't need nearly as much ski to float.

Oh, and eat something.
post #9 of 16
5'9" and 95lbs?

Dude, eat some cheeseburgers and do some pushups, seriously, you'll be able to ski a lot better with a bit more muscle mass, and at your age you should be able to jump start your metabolism and gain some weight pretty easily.

I think 5'9" and 95lbs is considered "dangerously underweight" from a medical standpoint.


As for skis, some 175 Armada ARVs would probably be just the ticket.

As for boots, you just gotta try a bunch on and find what works the best.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
5'9" and 95lbs?

Dude, eat some cheeseburgers and do some pushups, seriously, you'll be able to ski a lot better with a bit more muscle mass, and at your age you should be able to jump start your metabolism and gain some weight pretty easily.

I think 5'9" and 95lbs is considered "dangerously underweight" from a medical standpoint.


As for skis, some 175 Armada ARVs would probably be just the ticket.

As for boots, you just gotta try a bunch on and find what works the best.
Yeah I eat healthy amounts of reasonably healthy food, just have always been skinny. Just last week doc did some test and said it was fine. Unfortunately, those Armada ARV's appear to be more than i was looking to spend. Am I going to find any of these skis for under 150? The cheapest i found was ~160 on the trouble makers. I'm sure that there will be some drop in quality, but I honestly don't know if I would be able to get any of those as opposed to just whatever is cheapest in Sportsmart at the end of the season. I don't need anything great. Are there really no halfway-decent skis for less than these?

Thanks for all the help you guys. And as for my turning style, i rarely carve, i do drift-style turns mostly (but still like a sharp edge). For instance, anybody familiar with Alpine Meadows Might know "Scott Chute", a steep double black with moguls. This is exactly the kind of run that i love. Also, my skiing style isn't really compatible with powder days. All i need for a great day is good coverage, and snow that's soft enough to really corner against.

I can hardly wait for this upcoming season
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by eligray View Post
Am I going to find any of these skis for under 150? The cheapest i found was ~160 on the trouble makers. I'm sure that there will be some drop in quality, but I honestly don't know if I would be able to get any of those as opposed to just whatever is cheapest in Sportsmart at the end of the season. I don't need anything great. Are there really no halfway-decent skis for less than these?
Short answer: No, $160 for a Trouble Maker is a very good ski for a very good deal.

If you want cheaper look for a used ski that isn't throttled... or just ski what you have, skiing doesn't have to be gear-intensive. You can have a great time skiing on anything, but you can also have MORE fun skiing better with better equipment... but you don't have to. Good equipment costs money, buying crappy equipment that is cheap isn't a wise investment (skis aren't an investment, but you know what I'm getting at).
post #12 of 16
Christmas is coming maybe see if Mom and Dad will chip in with you. Maybe if you got some older brothers, sisters, or girlfriend that would be willing to throw $30 or whatever your way for Christmas instead of another video game or cds.

K2 PE's is a very good ski for the money and you can find them brand new in that $190 to $250 range quite a bit. Its going to be quite hard to find anything under $200 for a good setup unless its used and used hard in most cases. The Trouble makers are excellent also though it seems more people enjoy the PE's for all over the mountain performance.


Check out levelninesports.com and evogear.com both have pretty good prices. Then there is always Ebay with all sorts of deals.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
I just drove over to Sports Authority, and put my price range in perspective. I could probably get my parents to get a pair of skis up to $200 if i really try . So what specific things should i be looking for in a ski? soft/solid core? how shaped they are? width? Thanks again for the help so far, any ideas (or links) of what specifically i would be looking for?
post #14 of 16
post #15 of 16
Here's a fair deal on some skis you would probably enjoy:

http://www.untracked.com/p1318c51b37...ogul_skis.html
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by eligray View Post
I just drove over to Sports Authority, and put my price range in perspective. I could probably get my parents to get a pair of skis up to $200 if i really try . So what specific things should i be looking for in a ski? soft/solid core? how shaped they are? width? Thanks again for the help so far, any ideas (or links) of what specifically i would be looking for?
Go used... I got a pair of Nordica SUV14 XBS in 180cm. Great condition, only have four ski days on them since a full tune/grind. There is no damage to the bases and the top layers have only the minorist scratches. I'm not trying to solicit you, but it just so happens I got new skis today so I thought I'd mention it, and these skis aren't really designed for your specifications. My point is that I spent some $700+ on those a few years back and they're in great condition. I'm sure someone else is parting with their advanced level all mountain skis. You'd be better off getting an older set of skis designed for your skill level than to pick up some new pair of beginner/intermediate skis because that's all that will fit your budget.

Best luck!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Expert Skiier, knows not a thing about gear.