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shedding your shadow - Page 3

post #61 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
Cool.

So when I get out to Tahoe one of these years can I hit you up to show me a stash or two?
you'd be nuts not to do it!
post #62 of 85
I couldn't care less if someone wanted to follow me. Why would it bother you? Afraid you'll loose your exclusive private powder stash?
post #63 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
I don't know what it's like in the east, but where I come from ducking a rope is really frowned upon , & quite dangerous. In fact it can get you arrested, or worse.

JF
I remember skiing a cliff just beyond a rope. I asked about ducking the rope, and the guy who told me about the route told me it was just there so people didn't accidentally fall off the cliff. Now I'm wondering if he was telling the complete truth.
post #64 of 85
In all seriousness I have been on both sides of this issue. I have been glommed onto by lots of people looking to up their game and ski the trees and stashes. It rarely works out. They fail to take a critical cutoff and get stuck in a hole or can't handle off-piste conditions.

I got in over my head once skiing with a couple younger and much better skiers out of bounds. we were ducking ropes and taking lines I never dreamed existed. I had a great time, but had to respect that they were taking 40 to 60 foot drops that I had to go around. Awesome, and at least I made myself useful as videographer. My last run with these guys was the one where I fell off the trail and got stuck in a tree well, and they did return and rescue me. FWIW we all had rescue gear and beacons and were following good safety protocols on a moderate to high risk day in some of the best and deepest conditions I have ever experienced. I had AT skis and skins, and broke trail back to the lifts, but let them go at that point because they were so far beyond my ability.

I like hooking up with good skiers and on rare occasion it really works out well for all of us. Other times, there is a mis-match or mis-communication that results in separation or a feeling that things just aren't working out. I've never abandonded a skier in risky conditions, and most hook-ups have been memorable events both in and out of bounds. I appreciate that as skiers we hold common ideals that lead to quick bonds and good times, even if things aen't perfect. Usually separation is a mutual agreement, not something that has to be discussed or shouted out.
post #65 of 85
I didn't know skiers stalked like that.

I understand following a skier for a run. I've done it, and I've people have followed me. To do it again without saying hello seems strange. If I saw somebody following me, I guess I would introduce myself.
post #66 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Who looks back?

Following another skier when you don't know where they are going can certainly get you in trouble.
One of my favorite ways to get into trouble.

Don't worry, I'm not going to tell anybody about your secret line. I'm just visiting and will probably never ski at your area again.

Stopping to pee or get something out of your pack before venturing off the beaten path probably best idea to encourage lingering gapers to find their own way.

I did it when I was younger but it is kinda dangerous, because as others have pointed out, if following from a respectful distance into off-piste, you are still "on your own". Those of you who think you never have been followed, you might be surprised.
post #67 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclay2 View Post
I am a solo skier. None of my family or friends ski(not surprising, I live in Illinois). I like to chat on the lift and sometimes follow guys who seem to know what their doing. Some of you seem to think this is slightly rude. Is there a polite way of doing this? Is there a good way to get inside information to the mountain?

For a start, how about a bit of courtesy and honesty during that chat on the lift? Many folks are willing to share a bit of inside dope or lead for a run. Never hurts to ask during your ride up. I can't recall ever refusing such a request. I may have specific plans to take a line that's either too difficult or not exciting enough for my new companion, and will state my intentions. Can't imagine that I've ever told anyone to buzz off.
post #68 of 85
Haha, I've never interviewed people on the lift to find someone to stalk. I only followed people on two runs that I can remember and both times they appeared to be heading for a part of the mountain I was looking for already. Both ended being interesting runs but generally I find my own way.
post #69 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
I don't know what it's like in the east, but where I come from ducking a rope is really frowned upon , & quite dangerous. In fact it can get you arrested, or worse.

JF
FYI snowbird's rules still stand like this to this day.

the avy control gates are never to be ducked even if the area is open you can duck the rope.

then there are cliff warning ropes which can be ducked at anytime, and its totally legal. often by knowing you can duck those ropes will get you more powder though out the day.

and back east ducking a rope will never cause an avalanche. the worst you can do is hit shit underneath the snow. At the hidden valley pa they use to rope stuff untill it was groomed after a snowstorm. I ducked those ropes all the time and honestly though nothing of it. I mean come on they are grooming fresh snow?
post #70 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I remember skiing a cliff just beyond a rope. I asked about ducking the rope, and the guy who told me about the route told me it was just there so people didn't accidentally fall off the cliff. Now I'm wondering if he was telling the complete truth.
depending on the area yes. most 'real' ski area the ones that have open boundary or close to open boundary have lines to mark cliffs but you are allowed to ski under or over them.

A perfect example would is in this video here.



at 48 seconds me and jake duck a rope above one of the major cliff lines in mineral basin. there is a clean way though in may thats not there early season.

this actually got me in trouble at solitude one time because the ropes at solitude your not allowed to duck but as soon I said i ski the bird all the time a simple dont do it again was all he needed to tell me.
post #71 of 85

Following ?

I can't believe you guys haven't hit on getting rid of a chair follower. Only had one person maybe follow me (I never noticed), get on the chair and subsequently became a ski bud, nice guy.

So this isn't exactly a Follower Ditch as it is a Chairlift Unwanted Ditch (sort of the same).

Just before you are ready to get off lift ask him which way he's going, if he says left, let him off, hesitate, go right and yell at him, have a nice day, speeding off into.........................

Nice to see the majority of answers are pretty positive. I will show a stanger around my local hill, expecially if he is a foreigner (that idaho for anyone who doesn't live in Norther Id). Heck I'll be the guide for Bears at Silver Mt as long as you buy the beer at the end of the day.
post #72 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
this actually got me in trouble at solitude one time because the ropes at solitude your not allowed to duck but as soon I said i ski the bird all the time a simple dont do it again was all he needed to tell me.
Wow - I did not know that. Thanks for the heads up.
post #73 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
Tell them wearing Depends lets you ski all day without a single break.
post #74 of 85
"Have you heard the good news about Amway?"

Works like a charm.
post #75 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
"Have you heard the good news about Amway?"

Works like a charm.
Ambots noooo.
post #76 of 85
They get the lecture, do you have a transceiver, do you have a shovel, do you know the avy conditions, do you know where you are going? If they can't answer all in the positive well they're not going. I have ended up making sure they get back out when they did follow anyway. Usually on the next lap with a more serious lecture on being prepared.
As to the ones following you inbounds all the options have been covered some experiences are positive others well hiking uphill gets rid of most.
post #77 of 85
I haven't seen in this thread addressed what happens to instructors quite a bit: I am teaching a high level skier, he is very happy with the lesson, lesson is over, you have an hour to free ski and he is behind you on every run, you stop, he stops a dozen feet below you and looks up at you expecting some more tips on his skiing, essentially an extension of his lesson.

Especially if he is a regular, with maybe a seasons pass, your guest centered mandate and your instinct and training as an instructor kicks in and you end up essentially teaching him on every run. Few days later he sees you free skiing and manages to get a chair with you and you teach him all the way up and he sticks with you like glue. Instructor will tell you it happens regularly.

>>>If its the latter, that actually happens to you guys? SKI FASTER <<

My solution has been to SKI SLOWER, in hard cranked tight, fully completed short turns which don't lose a lot of vertical on each turn. I have found that all those speed hounds CAN'T ski like that, which actually isn't slow travel since the skis travel quite fast, it's just that each turn is completed in ten feet of vertical.

Few will have the patience to stick with you for more than a few minutes, if they do it is mostly to schedule a lesson with you to learn how to ski like that.

In my opinion, skiing fast does not require as much precision and is easier than precise controlled turns at a moderate or slower pace.

....Ott
post #78 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl View Post
...My solution has been to SKI SLOWER, in hard cranked tight, fully completed short turns which don't lose a lot of vertical on each turn. ....Ott
my comment is off the theme, but you remind me of using this turn to warm up each day. I will take a run making a thousand turns at as low a speed and as little vertical as is physically possible. (looks wierd nowdays, but so what) doing this is a super warm-up for the core muscles, especially the laterals, so crucial to making turns with angulation. just sharing something that definitely works
post #79 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl View Post
I haven't seen in this thread addressed what happens to instructors quite a bit: I am teaching a high level skier, he is very happy with the lesson, lesson is over, you have an hour to free ski and he is behind you on every run, you stop, he stops a dozen feet below you and looks up at you expecting some more tips on his skiing, essentially an extension of his lesson.

Especially if he is a regular, with maybe a seasons pass, your guest centered mandate and your instinct and training as an instructor kicks in and you end up essentially teaching him on every run. Few days later he sees you free skiing and manages to get a chair with you and you teach him all the way up and he sticks with you like glue. Instructor will tell you it happens regularly.

>>>If its the latter, that actually happens to you guys? SKI FASTER <<

My solution has been to SKI SLOWER, in hard cranked tight, fully completed short turns which don't lose a lot of vertical on each turn. I have found that all those speed hounds CAN'T ski like that, which actually isn't slow travel since the skis travel quite fast, it's just that each turn is completed in ten feet of vertical.

Few will have the patience to stick with you for more than a few minutes, if they do it is mostly to schedule a lesson with you to learn how to ski like that.

In my opinion, skiing fast does not require as much precision and is easier than precise controlled turns at a moderate or slower pace.

....Ott
I thought that was the way ski.
post #80 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl View Post
I haven't seen in this thread addressed what happens to instructors quite a bit: I am teaching a high level skier, he is very happy with the lesson, lesson is over, you have an hour to free ski and he is behind you on every run, you stop, he stops a dozen feet below you and looks up at you expecting some more tips on his skiing, essentially an extension of his lesson.

Especially if he is a regular, with maybe a seasons pass, your guest centered mandate and your instinct and training as an instructor kicks in and you end up essentially teaching him on every run. Few days later he sees you free skiing and manages to get a chair with you and you teach him all the way up and he sticks with you like glue. Instructor will tell you it happens regularly.

>>>If its the latter, that actually happens to you guys? SKI FASTER <<

My solution has been to SKI SLOWER, in hard cranked tight, fully completed short turns which don't lose a lot of vertical on each turn. I have found that all those speed hounds CAN'T ski like that, which actually isn't slow travel since the skis travel quite fast, it's just that each turn is completed in ten feet of vertical.

Few will have the patience to stick with you for more than a few minutes, if they do it is mostly to schedule a lesson with you to learn how to ski like that.

In my opinion, skiing fast does not require as much precision and is easier than precise controlled turns at a moderate or slower pace.

....Ott
I like it but my methd takes very little time with no risk of getting hit by the offending skier. Ott I would love to see you try that with PSACUSLA. I am pretty sure he would hit you. Straight running though get rids of him in a heartbeat.

In fact that PSACUSLA is the only person I can think of that I ever truly wanted to ski away from.
post #81 of 85
>>PSACUSLA<<<

Whoever he is?

...Ott
post #82 of 85
Ah so, finally got it with a little help from a friend

...Ott
post #83 of 85
the rest of us are still wondering!

is that a BW ism???
post #84 of 85
Nice post Ott, good points in there. I too like to loosen up with those type of turns.
post #85 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl View Post
I haven't seen in this thread addressed what happens to instructors quite a bit: I am teaching a high level skier, he is very happy with the lesson, lesson is over, you have an hour to free ski and he is behind you on every run
You could also whisper to a liftie to radio the patrol and have them hassle the dude
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