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Heeerrre newbie, newbie, newbie!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Alright ... I've got a sixty-ish, wife's 1st cousin, who's going to join us on a ski trip in January. This is a sixty-ish year old dude, single, not wealthy but adequate in the money department, and from Texas, who visited the wife and I earlier this year.

At some point our conversation turned to skiing, and the wife mentioned a trip I'd planned for Montana in January and he was intrigued. So I said,"why don't you join us"? To which he said,"sure - but I won't be skiing". After more discussion and thought, he e-mailed me this week to state he'd give it a try.

The point to this is I want to introduce him to skiing in a way that he is prepared, will appreciate it, get hooked and forever want to ski! My thoughts are to:
  1. Slowly introduce him to the fun and magnificence of the sport
  2. Make sure he has quality gear ... mainly outerwear, such that he keeps warm and dry
  3. First day - TAKE a LESSON from a qualified instructor
  4. Second day ... me personally, take him down the easier slopes, take breaks to keep from getting tired and more importantly injured, and keep it fun.
  5. Ski gear ... help with the appropriate ski, the size, etc. As for boots ... boots are a bit of an "acquired feel". But help him understand the importance of the fit, ones correctly sized, an appropriate model, etc.
Overall this is the growth progression I imagine for him this first trip. The idea as always is to promote the sport in such a way that people keep coming back. To me this guy has some moxy ... 60 years old and strapping on a pair for the first time.

Let me know your thoughts, comments or suggestions.
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post
Alright ... I've got a sixty-ish, wife's 1st cousin, who's going to join us on a ski trip in January. This is a sixty-ish year old dude, single, not wealthy but adequate in the money department, and from Texas, who visited the wife and I earlier this year.

At some point our conversation turned to skiing, and the wife mentioned a trip I'd planned for Montana in January and he was intrigued. So I said,"why don't you join us"? To which he said,"sure - but I won't be skiing". After more discussion and thought, he e-mailed me this week to state he'd give it a try.

The point to this is I want to introduce him to skiing in a way that he is prepared, will appreciate it, get hooked and forever want to ski! My thoughts are to:
  1. Slowly introduce him to the fun and magnificence of the sport
  2. Make sure he has quality gear ... mainly outerwear, such that he keeps warm and dry
  3. First day - TAKE a LESSON from a qualified instructor
  4. Second day ... me personally, take him down the easier slopes, take breaks to keep from getting tired and more importantly injured, and keep it fun.
  5. Ski gear ... help with the appropriate ski, the size, etc. As for boots ... boots are a bit of an "acquired feel". But help him understand the importance of the fit, ones correctly sized, an appropriate model, etc.
Overall this is the growth progression I imagine for him this first trip. The idea as always is to promote the sport in such a way that people keep coming back. To me this guy has some moxy ... 60 years old and strapping on a pair for the first time.

Let me know your thoughts, comments or suggestions.
Is he in relatively good shape? That could have a great deal of bearing on how successful your introduction is going to be. Some pre-trip conditioning might really help.

Props to you for taking on the assignment and to him for being willing to give it a go.

Good luck to both of you.
post #3 of 14
I've probably posted this 100 times on this forum and no one has argued with it: my standing suggestion for noobs is to go ice skating as much as possible before getting on skis. If the cousin already knows how to skate, refreshing the muscle strength and memory will make the transition to skiing lots easier. If he doesn't know how to skate -- skiing will seem much easier! And either way, assuming there's a reasonably local rink, it's something he can do ahead of time, with a modest investment of time and money, to gain confidence and coordination before the first time out.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Bob, he's in decent shape ... not overweight, slim and somewhat athletic. His big advantage is between his ears ... his attitude.

When he first said he'd not be skiing because he'd never skied before, I asked had he ever been to Montana before. He said no, and of course I said - then you can't go to Montana 'cuz you've never been there before either. Which led to further discussion and him giving the idea to ski some serious consideration.

ts01 ... excellent suggestion on the ice skating. I'd mentioned to him to start with a regimen of exercise and this will be a good starter.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post
I'd mentioned to him to start with a regimen of exercise and this will be a good starter.
The other nice thing about skating: it's not just "exercise", it's fun. Good luck, there are lots of late-in-life learners around here. I picked it up in my 40's but no doubt there are some 50's and 60's here too.
post #6 of 14
I taught my mother inlaw to ski at the age of 60. She has a slight vision problem that gives her difficulty with depth perception and make the hills scarier then for most. She was in excellent physical shape for her age. Slim, took tap dancing, did lots of walking. She is 74 now and buys a ski pass for her local hill every year and aims to go out once a week. She has never bothered to go off green runs. She has gone off them occasionally but not on her own and goes and skis the beginner runs and has a great time, stays in shape and likes the social aspect.

She was careful, learned as quickly as most skiiers and on the first day was going top to bottom at Panorma BC Begginer run (goes half way up 4500 verticle).

At Mt. Tremblant, QC, (she has gone with friends a couple times, what seniors today do for fun!), she took further lessons and still just likes the green runs. Take it really easy on your friend, due to his age, and let him set the pace he's comfortable with, and hopefully he'll love it and be a life long skier now. My motherinlaw can't wait to be 75 when she'll get to ski free!
post #7 of 14
Dorm,

I put on skis for the first time at 53, this will be season five. Fifty days the first year and 90-110 since then. Learning to ski has been the best thing that I've done for myself this decade. We're two weeks from the mountain opening here and I am so psyched!!

God bless you for taking the time to introduce your cousin to this great and wonderful sport. I've been so fortunate to have great friends there for support. I get to learn and they get to laugh.

We just have to be careful to keep our inner teenager in control.

At our mountain there is a three day lesson, lift pass, rental equipment deal that is quite reasonable. If this mountain has a similar deal it would get him well on his way and free you up. Y'all can do a run or two together afterward.

All the best,

Ken
post #8 of 14
Where in Montana are you going? If you're looking at Bridger, epic's own Nolo could be a great choice of instructor. If you're looking at Big Sky, I've skied with Ursala (Little Bear), and though I've not taken a lesson with her, the few runs we took together lead me to believe she'd be a great choice to try to get a lesson with.

Mind you, I've not taken lessons from either of them, but from skiing with them, I know that they'd both be great for lessons.

--A_0
post #9 of 14
my dad and i started skiing at the same time

he was 50, i was 19. 4 years later he is doing well with it. of course he's not a fantastic skier, and probably never will be, but he can handle almost anything groomed and is doing really well considering when he started

so having skid with an older beginner for the last 4 years i think im reasonably well placed to offer some tips

1. lessons for sure. but after the lessons, spend the afternoon with him and show him around the mountain a bit

2. be extremely patient. he will probably fall over a lot, and will get very tired very quickly (esp if its at high altitude). be there with him so that you can pick up his skis etc... when he falls and generally have an easy time of it

3. try to find somewhere quiet with very few people. he will probably be quite paranoid about what is around him so the fewer people the better

4. give him at least 3 or 4 goes at each run before you move onto something new so that he becomes more confident in his skiing (confidence is the key)

5. when you're trying something new, or a bit steeper that he is used to, lead to show him how to do the first couple of turns, but then let him take the lead and do it at his own pace. encouragement helps

hope it all goes well
post #10 of 14

Newbie

Kudos for taking on this learning task. All the above comments are good.

BUT. Some other advice. I am 6 yrs old than your cousin.
60 is not old to all men, don't fall into the trap of treating him like a child or an old man because he is neither. Treat him like an equal with NO condescending remarks. He is mature enough to know his limits, when he is tired, when he is having fun etc.
We all know men who are OLD at 45 or 50 but then we also know men that are young at 60-65.

And ask him if he wants to just ski that Green beginner run by himself and go at his own pace, he may say yes and feel more comforable doing so. He yes is a beginner but not a child.

Sorry for the lecture. Just an old man ranting I guess.
post #11 of 14
I would definitely second the ice skating. IMO you would be hard pressed to find a hockey player who couldn't ski relatively well after just a short time. I also agree with the confidence. With every person that I have taught to ski, the one thing that needed to happen before they made tons of progress was building their confidence up. It's amazing to see someone gain some confidence between days.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Kudos for taking on this learning task. All the above comments are good.

BUT. Some other advice. I am 6 yrs old than your cousin.
60 is not old to all men, don't fall into the trap of treating him like a child or an old man because he is neither. Treat him like an equal with NO condescending remarks. He is mature enough to know his limits, when he is tired, when he is having fun etc.
We all know men who are OLD at 45 or 50 but then we also know men that are young at 60-65.

And ask him if he wants to just ski that Green beginner run by himself and go at his own pace, he may say yes and feel more comforable doing so. He yes is a beginner but not a child.

Sorry for the lecture. Just an old man ranting I guess.
I was thinking the same exact thing, you cannot judge all 60ish year olds equally. I know guys my age who act like old grandpa's and I know 60 and older guys who would put some younger ones to shame. I would like to add that he may enjoy it more if he was team'd up with someone mature, they may relate on level that younger instructors may not be able to and it might just add to the experience. Just my opinion.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Kudos for taking on this learning task. All the above comments are good.

60 is not old to all men, don't fall into the trap of treating him like a child or an old man because he is neither.
We all know men who are OLD at 45 or 50 but then we also know men that are young at 60-65.
This dude is the youngest (between his ears) 60 year olds I've known. He's full of life, enjoys life, enjoys people, has a great outlook. I'm thinking long term here, in that when we occasionally do get to do a "guy" trip, this guy will be a mainstay.

Thus far the common theme seems to be:
  • Keep it simple
  • Take lessons, perhaps several
  • Stick to the easier, so he can have some fun
  • Give him some space - but be there to coach and help
  • Oh and lastly, pour up some tall, really tall gin & tonics for all at the end of the day
post #14 of 14

Old Fart Newbie

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post
This dude is the youngest (between his ears) 60 year olds I've known. He's full of life, enjoys life, enjoys people, has a great outlook. I'm thinking long term here, in that when we occasionally do get to do a "guy" trip, this guy will be a mainstay.

Thus far the common theme seems to be:
  • Keep it simple
  • Take lessons, perhaps several
  • Stick to the easier, so he can have some fun
  • Give him some space - but be there to coach and help
  • Oh and lastly, pour up some tall, really tall gin & tonics for all at the end of the day
Sounds like You've got it - good luck and have fun
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