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Explain to me how AT bindings work

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm bored at work, thinking up a project.

How exactly do AT bindings work? Specifically, climb mode. What sort of technique is used?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
I'm bored at work, thinking up a project.

How exactly do AT bindings work? Specifically, climb mode. What sort of technique is used?
ill sell you a set of snoop daddies with naxos for 250 bucks skins and everything....easiest way to see and reverse engineer.
post #3 of 12
From memory ...

Think of a "normal" alpine binding in which the heel and toe pieces are held together by a light, stiff, rod running up the center.

Then think of the heel piece being detachable and the toe piece able to pivot on the fore and aft plane. So, once the heel piece is unlocked, the heel comes free and the whole binding and boot can rise.

The final twist is that the mount that holds the heel in place for downhill skiing and unclips for walk mode also has an adjustable platform that can be used to provide a higher stop for the heel when it comes down, to make uphill walking easier on the calves.

(This is the system for Fritschis and, I think, Naxos, though not for Dynafits which, if I'm right, free the heel from the binding entirely and rely on pivot at the front of the boot.)
post #4 of 12
Dynafits also have a "televator" function. The heel piece can be twisted into two skewed positions to provide a stop on your heel coming down. The body of the heel piece is the lower one and the little post on the heel piece is the higher one, but you have to do it by hand, as opposed to Fritchis that can easily be flipped back and forth or locked down with your poles. This may not sound like a big deal, but when you are standing on a steep skin track and decide you want to engage the elevated heel function it can be a real pain in the a$$.
post #5 of 12
have you looked a an AT binding before????

naxo

diamer

duke
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
have you looked a an AT binding before????

naxo

diamer

duke
Pictures, yes.

I guess I should clarify a little. I understand the basic functionality of the pivoting toe and the locking heel. How does the heel stop function? I suppose I am sort of getting to what are the motions for skinning?
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
I guess I should clarify a little. I understand the basic functionality of the pivoting toe and the locking heel. How does the heel stop function? I suppose I am sort of getting to what are the motions for skinning?
Think x-c skiing.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Pictures, yes.

I guess I should clarify a little. I understand the basic functionality of the pivoting toe and the locking heel. How does the heel stop function? I suppose I am sort of getting to what are the motions for skinning?
It's hard to explain without a picture, but there is a wide, tiered, lever at the back of the binding. When it is flat, it brings with it a lock for the whole binding. When it is lifted (rotated forward) the lock releases the binding. On the lowest level of forward rotation there is no stop for the binding and the binding can pivot forward and come down flat on the ski. On the next level (rotated further forward) the back of the binding comes down on a ledge that gives five or ten per cent elevation, and so on to level three.

The fun part is that the lever has a ladder-type construction which both saves weight and gives a hole into which you can put a ski pole to raise the lever without having to bend down and round.

[Dynafits are different: the heel piece rotates.]
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Pictures, yes.

I guess I should clarify a little. I understand the basic functionality of the pivoting toe and the locking heel. How does the heel stop function? I suppose I am sort of getting to what are the motions for skinning?
the most fundamental is the fact that the skins have a nap that is directional. When sliding on snow, it slides when with the nap, and doesn't slide when against the nap. this peoperty allows you to slide the ski forward but doesn't allow the ski to slide backward.
The motion is similar to a nordictrack gym machine, and the Alpine touring binding and Alpine touring boots just allows this motion in ski equipment.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
I'm bored at work, thinking up a project.
Here's one to keep you occupied : an AT/Tele binding, where:

1) free pivot and heel ladder for climbs and touring
2) releasable
3) lock down heel or ball of foot (with flex) for solid alpine or tele turns (not door-hinge-marking)
4) accepts AT or duck billed tele boots

Let me know when you git 'er done.

With a lockable hinge under BOF, the Silvretta 500 would get you in the ballpark:



post #11 of 12
think XC skiing up

think a lock for the heel to keep down

think DH ("normal") skiing down
post #12 of 12


This one is a pretty basic design. Alpine toe piece and heel piece connected to each other by a pair of bars. The toe piece is mounted to the ski via a hinge so that the entire binding can pivot at the toe. The heel lock (red piece) is mounted to the ski, and acts like a clamp holding the rails under the heelpiece down against the ski for downhill mode. For climbing mode the clamp flips up (as shown) so that the binding can pivot under the toe. The heel lock will now act as a heel riser/climbing bar, raising the platform you stand on and thereby making hiking uphill easier. Some have adjustments to do this at different heights. Hope this helps!
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