EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Time for the annual snow tire thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Time for the annual snow tire thread - Page 5

post #121 of 143
If tire compound was the important factor I would not have to sipe my tires. The rubber is very soft and the tire only lasts for about 15,000 miles with over 1" tall lugs. Rubber does not grip on snow and ice it is the edges of the lugs that do the gripping.
post #122 of 143


I'm trying to avoid ending up like that again. Drove up to Stowe twice during heavy snow. First time had to take a FWD car with "efficiency" tires, and spun out twice as in the picture above, and also had to get out and push a half dozen times. That is about as bad a combo as it gets short of slicks on a RWD car. Went back in an SUV with 4WD and all season tires, life was much better without the spin outs and pushing, but it still would have been better with snow tires.

Since then I've replaced my FWD car with a Subaru Forester so I have AWD, and I want to get dedicated snow tires. My main question is when to get them. I won't need them at home because it rarely snows. I'm driving from NJ to Colorado January 1st and coming back to NJ mid-Feb, and obviously I want them for my time in CO and thats about it.

Should I put them on in NJ and drive cross country with them? Or buy them when I get there? It is about 1,500 miles each way and I don't know how much of that will be dry and how much will be snowy. I'm worried that if all but the last 200 miles are dry I'm going to wreck the tires before I get to the mountain. But if I don't get them ahead of time I won't have them on my first trip up to the mountains (staying in Winter Park for 6 weeks). I'm not keeping my current summer tires so that doesn't factor in. If I change them in NJ I could get dedicated wheels as well.

I'm thinking Blizzack WS-60s since it will basically be 100% on snow once I get there (I think, never been to CO before but stayed that same time in Stowe last year and it seemed to be so it has to snow out there more right?).
post #123 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by CR0SS View Post

If tire compound was the important factor I would not have to sipe my tires. The rubber is very soft and the tire only lasts for about 15,000 miles with over 1" tall lugs. Rubber does not grip on snow and ice it is the edges of the lugs that do the gripping.

It's a bit more complicated than that.  See www.wheels.ca/article/470620

What works on ice does not work on snow and vice versa. Snow grip vs ice grip is a tradeoff that the engineers make. To promote ice grip, some tires incorporate microscopic air bubbles in the rubber compound which basically act like sipes - I think of this as a property of the rubber compound, but if you want to call it "siping" be my guest.
post #124 of 143
I will go with the all season Bridgestones that my Forester came with and throw iron (chains) if I encounter anything beyond nasty.   Car payment doesn't leave much leftover cash for dedicated rulbber, but I will go with A/T or snows when I HAVE to replace the tires. I've used 4WD with both all season and A/T and A/T was noticibly better on snow.  They were equal on ice, maybe all season gettting a slight edge.  I mostly like the way the A/Ts and snows look in addition to the added grip in deeper stuff.
post #125 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Method9455 View Post

I'm thinking Blizzack WS-60s since it will basically be 100% on snow once I get there (I think, never been to CO before but stayed that same time in Stowe last year and it seemed to be so it has to snow out there more right?).

If I were you I'd get the LMs and I'd mount in Nov, remove in April. It snows in Jersey too, but you are on mostly dry roads. The WSs would get eaten alive.
post #126 of 143
FWIW, Consumer Reports' recommended passenger car winter tires from the latest issue are the Michelin X-Ice XI 2 ($106), the General Altimax Arctic ($75), and the Nokian Hakkapeliitta 5 ($164). The only area where the cheaper General did significantly worse than the other two was in rolling resistance. They all had pretty bad ratings for "three season driving", except for the General having "very good" wet braking. The Michelin Primacy Alpin A3 ($93) ranked just below these and had generally good marks for all around driving, but was not as highly ranked as the first three for winter driving. The X-Ice really had a big lead in overall score, 84 to 78 for both of the runners-up.
Michelin tires also earned top rankings in three all season categories (S/T, H, and V speed ratings). I was glad to see that the Primacy MXV4 tires that we bought for my wife's Avalon topped the H category.
They don't give detailed reviews, but do list the Michelin Latitude X-Ice and Bridgestone Blizzak DM-Z3 as their recommended pickup/SUV winter tires (both about $130).
Again, FWIW...I honestly tend to go more by TireRack ratings when I buy (even though I suspect a good percentage of those are fake).
post #127 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post




If I were you I'd get the LMs and I'd mount in Nov, remove in April. It snows in Jersey too, but you are on mostly dry roads. The WSs would get eaten alive.

Thanks for the advice, thats what I was worried about. By LM do you mean this one:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Bridgestone&tireModel=Blizzak+LM-60

there are a few different LMs but that seemed most aplicable
post #128 of 143
A thread debating winter tires on a ski forum???  My mind is blown.

Buy Bridgestone Blizzaks or Dunlop Winter Sport's if your car necessitates the bump in speed rating/tire size.

/thread
post #129 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I will go with the all season Bridgestones that my Forester came with and throw iron (chains) if I encounter anything beyond nasty.   Car payment doesn't leave much leftover cash for dedicated rulbber, but I will go with A/T or snows when I HAVE to replace the tires. I've used 4WD with both all season and A/T and A/T was noticibly better on snow.  They were equal on ice, maybe all season gettting a slight edge.  I mostly like the way the A/Ts and snows look in addition to the added grip in deeper stuff.

I am running snows on mine this winter, I am planning more than a few trips to VT this winter, better safe than sorry. The cost for tires/wheels will be offsetted by saving wear on my regular tires, plus with 29K on the original tires, i didn't want to drive them this winter. 
post #130 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Method9455 View Post




Thanks for the advice, thats what I was worried about. By LM do you mean this one:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Bridgestone&tireModel=Blizzak+LM-60

there are a few different LMs but that seemed most aplicable
 

Yep, those ones.
post #131 of 143
So what are peoples thoughts on Xice2 vs. Blizzak 60? I used to have Xice on my old car and was happy with them but back then I drove alot more highway miles in the winter as well.
post #132 of 143
The latest subjective tests I've seen put the Xice 2 ahead of the Blizzak.
post #133 of 143
My local trusted sources for car insights recommended Hankooks to me for my Impreza, so I put studded Hankook i*PIKEs on it. As cgeib observed, I have never needed or used studs before, but I've decided after a harrowing drive home from DIA last week and after remembering that I am often on my way up I-70 before the plows, to go ahead and add the studs.

I started thinking I'd want Nokians, but my car care guys (who have worked on all our cars since we moved to Boulder in 1990) recommended the Hankooks instead. I used X-ices on my Acura before these, so I'll let you know. Just by the looks of them, I'm betting they are a good step above. 
post #134 of 143
I put Firestone Winterforce snow tires on my explorer and on Mrs SSs Xterra last year. They performed very well on both trucks with no issues.  I live at 6500' and have to drive over Mt Rose @ 9000' to get to the mountain or the airport so they get well tested!   Wear rate also seems to be good and for the price they are excellent value.  Just changed my truck for a Q7 so now need to start looking all over again for an 18inch tire.  Anyone tried the Blizzak DM-Z3 or DM-V1?
post #135 of 143
A dedicated set of winter tires and rims is the best choice if your doing alot of travelling. I went with the Toyo Snowprox S952 winter tires for the Jetta and have to say they do a great job keeping me in a straigt line in a blistering snow storm. The one downfall is the soft gummy feeling you get when driving on dry roads and the tires will wear out faster do to the soft rubber used in the construction of the tire. 

With the extra traction and the confidence it gives you dedicated snow tires and rims are the way to Go
post #136 of 143
 I just picked up 4 new Cooper WeatherMaster S/T2's new off of Craigslist for 200.00. Now to get some 16" Subaru rims. 
post #137 of 143
 There is a good article on the subject in the new Car and Driver. They tested four Michelins from summer to all-season to performance winter and regular winter. It makes a pretty strong case for the performance winter tire for anyone that lives down country and drives on dry roads a lot. I knew that the real snows are pretty bad performers on dry roads, but the numbers are quite eye-opening. Performance winter doesn't give up much to the all-weather on dry roads, but crushes it on snow and ice. I'll be sticking with my Q-rated snows because more than half of my drive is on snow and ice all winter, but if I still lived in CT and was making the weekly drive up North, for sure I'd be on a tire like the Pilot or the Blizzak LM.
post #138 of 143
Just got some Studded snows yesterday. Arctic Claw TXi at the local tire shop. They seem pretty solid tires. Decide dI wanted real studs since I do alot of canyon driving and the road is half in the shade and always icy in the mornings.

I seem to have lost 3 studs in the first 80 miles on the set of tires. I assume that once they are broken in this stops happening so frequently? 
Edited by tromano - 11/22/09 at 1:21pm
post #139 of 143
Driving real winter snow tires is one of the safest most responsible things a skier can do. sort of bumping this for visibility and quoting you guys for truth.^^^^^^^^^^^^
post #140 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 There is a good article on the subject in the new Car and Driver. They tested four Michelins from summer to all-season to performance winter and regular winter. It makes a pretty strong case for the performance winter tire for anyone that lives down country and drives on dry roads a lot. I knew that the real snows are pretty bad performers on dry roads, but the numbers are quite eye-opening. Performance winter doesn't give up much to the all-weather on dry roads, but crushes it on snow and ice. I'll be sticking with my Q-rated snows because more than half of my drive is on snow and ice all winter, but if I still lived in CT and was making the weekly drive up North, for sure I'd be on a tire like the Pilot or the Blizzak LM.


Very good article. I wish C/D did more tests like that, because they explain in depth what they did and how they got their results. Info from other sources is not as easy to interpret. I study the data from Tire Rack and Consumer Reports, and the inconsistencies give me a headache. I just replaced the Nokian WR G2. They sucked and didn't last or perform as well (on a 4WD vehicle!) as the previous model (Nokian WR - they were GREAT) that they replaced. For snow performance, Consumer Reports gives the G2 the highest rating under Performance Winter, but an average rating under Performance All Season. WTF? Based on my experience, I give the WR G2 two thumbs WAY down.

post #141 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Just got some Studded snows yesterday. Arctic Claw TXi at the local tire shop. They seem pretty solid tires. Decide dI wanted real studs since I do alot of canyon driving and the road is half in the shade and always icy in the mornings.

I seem to have lost 3 studs in the first 80 miles on the set of tires. I assume that once they are broken in this stops happening so frequently? 


You can't drive them at top speed and expect the studs to stay in.

post #142 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post




You can't drive them at top speed and expect the studs to stay in.

 

 Dude seriously? That was a year ago.

post #143 of 143

One reason that people might not run studs when they seldom drive on ice is that braking on dry roads is compromised.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Time for the annual snow tire thread