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Why Should I Learn to Ski?

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
I mean, I'm having so much fun with whatever it is that I'm doing now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I'd contend that it's because a lot of people are happy with being good at skiing bad. But that's a whole 'nother thread.

Ok, here it is.


I've been skiing (or something) for about seventeen years now. I've always had a blast. Skiing made winter into a boon to look forward to all year instead of a bane to endure. I ski in control, I ski fast and I ski with a huge grin on my face. I have no interest in racing or otherwise quantifying the 'success' of my skiing.

Last year I had my first lesson. It was a positive experience and I'm going to do it again this year. But here's (one of) the thing(s): I don't have the time or the money to ski half as much as I'd like to. When I do get out on the slopes I want to enjoy myself. Practicing technique and doing drills makes for somewhat less than 100% of the potential enjoyment.

I suspect I'm one of those people who are good at skiing bad. So what's wrong with that?

disclaimer: much of the above is heart felt, some of it is there for the sake of argument.
post #2 of 59
Skiing is like sex; the more you know and the better you are at it, the better it gets and the more you enjoy it.

My compromise, take a small portion out of your skiing day to do drills or work on something or other. Enjoy the rest of the day. I've had three lessons, all privates, most of the time in the lesson was spent skiing. I'll have to try out the group lesson thing this year.

Damn, now I'll have to guess my level for the group placement. I think I'm 8 so probably 6? I'm sure there are holes in my skiing-skill CV.
post #3 of 59
After many years of trying hard to improve my skiing skills, I am starting to accept my limitations and just enjoy what I got. I still want to improve and will work on it, but without being too critical and obsessive about the whole thing.
post #4 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Skiing is like sex; the more you know and the better you are at it, the better it gets and the more you enjoy it.
Ha The drills for great sex are more fun than the drills for great skiing


Good point but I'm not so sure I agree. It's easy to say that I had more fun skiing Windows at Breck last year than I did skiing the bunny hill at Mt. Holly in '74. But when I remember those early days I was just as jazzed to get back to Mt. Holly back then as I am to get back to the Rockies now.
post #5 of 59
One way I can reply to that ????? is if there was anything in skiing you cannot do now that you want to do? If there is seek out someone who could take you to that next level whatever that would be. If you are able to ski everything you want and are happy with what you are doing why bother with lessons. To see if there is another level you want to attain you could take a lesson/guided tour of a place and have someone take you to your limits and see if you want to try more at a later time.
post #6 of 59
Skiing is like sex in the fact, even if you are doing it wrong, it is still good too.

Lars (and I) have also had similar questions like this. I still feel that skiing is art, there is no right way, but what suites you and your needs. You can always pick up a few tools to add to the tool box of knowledge, but it is not important to me (and I will add Lars) I see no need for a 12 sided socket along with the 6 sided one in my toolbox of knowledge. I have no desire to become a professional student, I'd rather be off free skiing or buying gear (to compensate ).
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Damn, now I'll have to guess my level for the group placement. I think I'm 8 so probably 6? I'm sure there are holes in my skiing-skill CV.
We don't do those numbers up here. Groups are usually split via short ski-off on day 1. That way you get into the right group. It does not take a whole lot of turns to gauge someones level.

Or you could just say you're and intermediate.
post #8 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post
One way I can reply to that ????? is if there was anything in skiing you cannot do now that you want to do? If there is seek out someone who could take you to that next level whatever that would be. If you are able to ski everything you want and are happy with what you are doing why bother with lessons. To see if there is another level you want to attain you could take a lesson/guided tour of a place and have someone take you to your limits and see if you want to try more at a later time.
This.

If there is something I don't have the confidence or skills to do, and I really want to do it, then I work at it, get lessons, do what it takes to get the skills and confidence. Otherwise, I'm just out there to have as much fun as possible and not worry about perfecting technique, comparing myself to others, or developing some new skill that I have no interest in.
post #9 of 59
bumpfreaq,

Skiing is all about fun! I strive to get better because that's my nature and for me the learning process is enjoyable.

If you are able to do the things you want to do, ski the terrain and conditions you want to ski, can do it safely without hurting others, and have a great time doing it, I don't know that you need to "learn" anything.

On the other hand if you find yourself saying:

I wish I skied powder better...
Those bumps look too big, I'll go over here...
That run looks too steep...
Boy, am I pooped (and it's only 1:00)...

Maybe there are things you can learn!

Mike
post #10 of 59
To have more fun of course.

There is a high probability that a good instructor will be able to spot some mechanical flaws that will make your ski days more enjoyable.

Better control and less burn out .... if you are doing "it" .. .. wrong, then "it" can be like skiing or scr.. er ... anyhow, with an anvil around your neck.

post #11 of 59
That's it! I am signing up for sex lessons
post #12 of 59
Group lessons available, just dial 1-888- ....
post #13 of 59
Freaq,

Learning to ski (aka getting better) is making an investment that returns more fun in the future that requires giving up some fun now. For some people, the payoff can be immediate (e.g. the lesson is more fun than normal skiing and the increase in fun from non-lesson skiing is immediate). Other people may get a lower (or even negative) rate of return. Only you can decide what level of investment makes sense. There's nothing wrong with being happy about your skill level no matter level you may be at.
post #14 of 59
Quote:
That's it! I am signing up for sex lessons
Lucky for you, opportunity meets desire at the Mustang Ranch, just a hop and skip from your place, Bud.
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
Lucky fir you...just a hop and skip from your place, Bud.
Nov 3, 2008

Hi Nolo:

You left out the famous Tina Fey wink.

Think Snow

CP
post #16 of 59
How can get certified?
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmckimson View Post
bumpfreaq,

Skiing is all about fun! I strive to get better because that's my nature and for me the learning process is enjoyable.

If you are able to do the things you want to do, ski the terrain and conditions you want to ski, can do it safely without hurting others, and have a great time doing it, I don't know that you need to "learn" anything.

On the other hand if you find yourself saying:

I wish I skied powder better...
Those bumps look too big, I'll go over here...
That run looks too steep...
Boy, am I pooped (and it's only 1:00)...

Maybe there are things you can learn!

Mike
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Freaq,

Learning to ski (aka getting better) is making an investment that returns more fun in the future that requires giving up some fun now. For some people, the payoff can be immediate (e.g. the lesson is more fun than normal skiing and the increase in fun from non-lesson skiing is immediate). Other people may get a lower (or even negative) rate of return. Only you can decide what level of investment makes sense. There's nothing wrong with being happy about your skill level no matter level you may be at.
Absolutely...I'm with you guys!
post #18 of 59
Thread Starter 
Thank you to everyone who has spent time and effort to answer my questions. I hope this discussion continues. Ya know, I was expecting quite a few closed minded, sophomoric responses but instead I've gotten quite a bit of wisdom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mmckimson View Post
I strive to get better because that's my nature and for me the learning process is enjoyable.


Mike
Yeah, I totally get that and it's in my nature to strive for improvement too. It is, however, against my nature to seek help in improving. I guess I want to improve really slowly Improve by putting miles and miles of snow under my skis, by skiing with good skiers, by reading a bit here and experimenting with it on my own. I guess it's way against my nature to find someone who knows enough about both skiing and teaching to speed up my improvement. Yeah, I know, that's probably even more stupid than it sounds and I am making efforts to thwart myself and speed up my improvement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
There is a high probability that a good instructor will be able to spot some mechanical flaws that will make your ski days more enjoyable.
Huh, seek out somebody to point out my flaws... and then pay them.... and then tip them. That doesn't make any sense at all.

Ok, I know it makes total sense, and I've done it and I'll do it again. One of the things I wanted to do with this thread is to point out that there must be a lot of potential students out there, peeps who do want to get better but who find it difficult to make that first step largely because of the attitude (or perceived attitude) of many of the 'do it my way or you're doing it wrong' instructors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug
I still feel that skiing is art, there is no right way, but what suits you and your needs.
Yeah, I agree with this. In my view instructors who insist that there is one right way and that any other way is bad skiing are such a huge turn off to the whole premise of ski coaching/instruction. I really think that instructors who espouse these views are doing themselves a horrible disservice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
There's nothing wrong with being happy about your skill level no matter level you may be at.
That is such a breath of fresh air. Thanks
post #19 of 59
bumpfreaq, see, we're not all so bad! (instructors that is) Actually there are many more great coaches and instructors out there then there are bad ones.

Speaking of stereotyping, did you ever see the South Park Asspen episode 603? Very funny!

http://www.southparkstuff.com/season.../epi603videos/
post #20 of 59
bump,

Given that I pretty much have always been in the same camp as you on this subject, I am quite interested in this thread. I also have not wanted to "waste" my rare days in lessons. I too tend to like to be a self-learner. I like learning from watching and trying to emulate, so I love skiing with people better than me and if they have any advice I love getting it too. Learn while having fun and just doing it...that's been my style.

I still suck at a lot of things though. I'm contemplating lessons this year now that I live near great ski areas and plan to get a lot more days in this year. We'll see if it actually happens though...the siren call of pushing and exploring is hard to ignore...
post #21 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by olylady View Post
bumpfreaq, see, we're not all so bad! (instructors that is) Actually there are many more great coaches and instructors out there then there are bad ones.
Oh, I know. I've run into more than a few of y'all in my time..... uh.. figuratively speaking of course
post #22 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
bump,

Given that I pretty much have always been in the same camp as you on this subject, I am quite interested in this thread. I also have not wanted to "waste" my rare days in lessons. I too tend to like to be a self-learner. I like learning from watching and trying to emulate, so I love skiing with people better than me and if they have any advice I love getting it too. Learn while having fun and just doing it...that's been my style.

I still suck at a lot of things though. I'm contemplating lessons this year now that I live near great ski areas and plan to get a lot more days in this year. We'll see if it actually happens though...the siren call of pushing and exploring is hard to ignore...
Hopefully we can get together some time this season and learn a thing or two from each other

I hope my attitude isn't seen as anti-(high end) lessons. There's certainly much to be learned if the right student/teacher combo is found.

I guess one of the take aways from this thread could be 'if you're happy and you know it, clap your hands But if you're not, go get some help
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
Ha The drills for great sex are more fun than the drills for great skiing


Good point but I'm not so sure I agree. It's easy to say that I had more fun skiing Windows at Breck last year than I did skiing the bunny hill at Mt. Holly in '74. But when I remember those early days I was just as jazzed to get back to Mt. Holly back then as I am to get back to the Rockies now.

You know that's the great thing about skiing, and sex for that matter, you can have just as much fun and exhilaration as a beginner as you can as a seasoned veteran! What you don't know doesn't detract from the fun you are having now, but as you progress and get better, new levels of fun and thrills present themselves to you!

PS. I think the Mustang Ranch is a museum now? After the government seized it and tried to run it themselves, it kinda lost patronage. I wonder why?... Imagining Uncle Sam is watching you would be kinda creepy?
post #24 of 59
In golf there's the tee box and the hole and achieving competency becomes a function of how many instead of how. There are a million ways to swing the gold club witnessed at any golf course every day of the week. In skiing we can see skiers making perfect repetitive turns on the groomed and look really really good yet these same skiers can fall apart in bumps, trees, steeps, and powder. The question becomes WHY?

Maybe a different skill set that needs to transfer itself to more difficult conditions. I see it all the time, skiers that do not look all that proficient on the groomers , skiing very competently in demanding conditions. Maybe the standard for skiing should become more a function of the terrain you can handle while skiing in control and a little less of the fine nuances of carving on the groomed. I'm not suggesting this becasue I think I'm a better off piste skier, in fact just the opposite, I'm a heck of alot more comfortable on groomed surfaces.
post #25 of 59

Learning to Ski

[quote=bud heishman;986585]You know that's the great thing about skiing, and sex for that matter, you can have just as much fun and exhilaration as a beginner as you can as a seasoned veteran!

One of the all time truths about skiing. I can distinctly remembr the green Corkscrew run at Sierra Ski Ranch (a green) that I enjoyed so much back 35 yrs ago.

One way to avoid lessons and DRILLS (ugh) and still improve your skiing is to try and ski with someone who is a little better than you are. You will ski new terrain, push yourself a little and improve.

No doubt when you get better your will have less and less BAD days or even BAD runs and your enjoyment level will go up. There is nothing that replaces Time on the Snow, sure there are a lot of instructors that will say you're learning bad habits........................ but hey - fun is what it is about and fun for one is uaually on a different plateau than it is for another skier-we are all different.
post #26 of 59
Falling is fun!, if you have the right attitude!

It's a Sports Diamond thing? Can't have a bad day if your head is in the right place.
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
PS. I think the Mustang Ranch is a museum now? After the government seized it and tried to run it themselves, it kinda lost patronage. I wonder why?... Imagining Uncle Sam is watching you would be kinda creepy?
They are back in business. They have a webp-site...
post #28 of 59
Found that on a search for certification programs eh ?
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
In my view instructors who insist that there is one right way and that any other way is bad skiing are such a huge turn off to the whole premise of ski coaching/instruction. I really think that instructors who espouse these views are doing themselves a horrible disservice.
How about if there's an easy way and a hard way. But the easy way may seem hard to learn when you are used to doing it the hard way.
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
You know that's the great thing about skiing, and sex for that matter, you can have just as much fun and exhilaration as a beginner as you can as a seasoned veteran!
I LOL'd at this excellent point.
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