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post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Thanks. That makes sense for just trying for the lst time. I have a few places I can take the lift up ski the back side and come around the mt. on an old road etc., thanks for info. That way I can buy trekker and skins and at least get a sampling without getting a bank loan.
Hi, Pete.

Just to offer an alternative thought, I get the impression that you're a passionate skier and you're pretty serious about eventually getting into backcountry skiing. I also believe that once you try it, you're going to want to do more and more of it.

Given that, I think buying Trekkers is a bad idea.

You'll pay almost as much for Trekkers as you will for a used pair of Fritschis or Naxos.

You can also buy a used pair of skis and practically any kind of skis will work for the spring skiing you're talking about. Ski performance is just not a big consideration if you're mostly walking up on hard snow in the morning and skiing back down on corn or slushy snow. You can also buy used two-to-four-year-old mid-fats for next to nothing and believe me, that's all you need for your inaugural forays into spring bc skiing. My partner uses a pair of 150cm beginner rental skis.

If you get a setup of used Fritschis/Naxos and some dirt-cheap used skis, I think you'll have spent very little more than what a pair of new Trekkers would cost you. And, you would have a setup that's much more convenient and versatile.

Before you buy Trekkers, let me see what might be available in the ski school locker room when you come to Jackson in February. There's ALWAYS somebody looking to unload some gear cheap.
post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 

bc

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Hi, Pete.

Just to offer an alternative thought, I get the impression that you're a passionate skier and you're pretty serious about eventually getting into backcountry skiing. I also believe that once you try it, you're going to want to do more and more of it.

Given that, I think buying Trekkers is a bad idea.

You'll pay almost as much for Trekkers as you will for a used pair of Fritschis or Naxos.

You can also buy a used pair of skis and practically any kind of skis will work for the spring skiing you're talking about. Ski performance is just not a big consideration if you're mostly walking up on hard snow in the morning and skiing back down on corn or slushy snow. You can also buy used two-to-four-year-old mid-fats for next to nothing and believe me, that's all you need for your inaugural forays into spring bc skiing. My partner uses a pair of 150cm beginner rental skis.

If you get a setup of used Fritschis/Naxos and some dirt-cheap used skis, I think you'll have spent very little more than what a pair of new Trekkers would cost you. And, you would have a setup that's much more convenient and versatile.

Before you buy Trekkers, let me see what might be available in the ski school locker room when you come to Jackson in February. There's ALWAYS somebody looking to unload some gear cheap.
Thanks for the help Bob. After going to the class, shopping around in Spokane shops and on the net, reading a lot of stuff on Epic and drawing on my own experience and knowledge of myself I think I will do this (your comments are appreciated):

A ways into season, when I get my legs under me. Will rent skis, bindings and skins for 2 days and venture slowing into BC. There are several "safe" areas where I can take a lift up, ski off into the BC, reach a road and skin back. Thinking this might be a good way to start. After 2 days I think I will have an idea if I will continue. Regret not hiking into some areas this summer b ut to tell you the truth I never even thought about doing it that way until I read your post/suggestions. BC interests me this winter but only on a limited basis due to safety and cost mainly. Late spring BC I really want to do as love to hike, see new places etc. I certainly see your point on Trekkers. I have an old pair of rock skis, Atomic R10's, 165 that I used to teach beginners and ski on early season rollers, they would probably be fine for hiking up and skiing small patches down? Have reg bindings on them but theese would be ok for the hike in the spring, no good for skinning of course. Thanks, if you have time your opinions/comments are appreciated. Pete
post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Thanks for the help Bob. After going to the class, shopping around in Spokane shops and on the net, reading a lot of stuff on Epic and drawing on my own experience and knowledge of myself I think I will do this (your comments are appreciated):

A ways into season, when I get my legs under me. Will rent skis, bindings and skins for 2 days and venture slowing into BC. There are several "safe" areas where I can take a lift up, ski off into the BC, reach a road and skin back. Thinking this might be a good way to start. After 2 days I think I will have an idea if I will continue. Regret not hiking into some areas this summer b ut to tell you the truth I never even thought about doing it that way until I read your post/suggestions. BC interests me this winter but only on a limited basis due to safety and cost mainly. Late spring BC I really want to do as love to hike, see new places etc. I certainly see your point on Trekkers. I have an old pair of rock skis, Atomic R10's, 165 that I used to teach beginners and ski on early season rollers, they would probably be fine for hiking up and skiing small patches down? Have reg bindings on them but theese would be ok for the hike in the spring, no good for skinning of course. Thanks, if you have time your opinions/comments are appreciated. Pete
I think that's the way to approach it. Those R10's would be just fine for *most* of the snow conditions you might run into in the spring. Probably the biggest issue for you initially will be getting up the hill.

If you're hiking up on bare ground to the top of a snowfield (which I do quite a bit of):

Here, the only thing you have to do is figure out how to get your ski boots to the top. You'll probably walk up in hiking shoes and carry your boots either in your pack or clicked into your bindings. Once you get to the snow, you may be able to walk on the snow if it isn't too steep or too soft/punchy. If the snow is reliably solid, walking up in ski boots is probably the easiest and safest thing to do. Just don't do this on steep, hard, slick snow conditions until you've practiced the whole thing for awhile.

If you're walking up on snow:

You'll probably walk in your ski boots. One big issue with this is how solid the snow is. Nothing is more frustrating or exhausting than trying to walk uphill while you're postholing in the snow. That - obviously - is where having skins can really make a difference. If you find yourself starting uphill and you're sinking in very much, I'd call off the expedition. If you're postholing on spring conditions, there's also a fairly high likelihood that the skiing would suck anyway.

That's one of the really cool things about backcountry skiing. You start really learning to pay attention to all the big and little factors that go into determining snow quality. You'll learn about overnight temperatures, clear skies versus cloud cover, inversions, wind, tree cover (the snow around big trees often doesn't freeze as solidly overnight as the snow in open areas), elevation, aspect, the time of day that the sun first shines on a particular area of snow (called "sun hit"), etc. All of these can make a huge difference in how easily you can ascend and how good the skiing is on the way down. They also help determine the safety of what you're doing if you're hiking/skiing areas that are avalanche susceptible.

You'll also learn in that kind of skiing that early, early starts are best. By late April and early May (which is my favorite time for that kind of skiing here in the Tetons), the sun is *up* by about 7:30 in the morning. I usually time my outings to be ready to start downhill an hour to at most two hours after the sun has started shining on a slope. Any later than that and you're likely to get really sloppy skiing and it *might* start getting dangerous from an avalanche standpoint.

The ideal late-spring/early-summer weather is warm, sunny days and cold, clear nights. The more freeze/thaw cycles you have, the better (and safer) the snow will be. You'll be able to travel on the snow more easily when it's frozen and skiing on it is more fun when it's thawing. Just make sure you're not skiing or hiking in the path of avalanches that could start well above you and slide down to where you are.

Another thing that doesn't get mentioned much about late-season skiing is that you can (at least *I* can) have a great deal of fun on very moderate pitches. Often the skiing is so smooth and pleasant that you just feel like you're swooping along over undulating terrain or in and out of the trees. It's truly hero skiing and I can have a ton of fun on a twenty-degree slope in good corn conditions.

There's lots of safe and fun backcountry skiing that you can do in the spring. It's just a matter of getting out there and learning as you go.
post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 

BC

Thanks Bob, you are really an inspiration to me. Loved your photos of th Teton trips. Just reviewed a thread you posted pictures on in August, regarding the Alaska trip and Mt. How'd it go?

This winter when I get to the top of Lookout pass on the Idaho/Montana I will take some pics of the area I have in mind and post them.

How did you like the BD Havocs, looked at them really close in Spokane the other day. They rent a Havoc setup with skins so may sample that this year. The spring ideas sound great and am planning already.

Me too, love corn snow, timing the snow is everything. Thanks Bob, see you in Feb. Pete
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Thanks Bob, you are really an inspiration to me. Loved your photos of th Teton trips. Just reviewed a thread you posted pictures on in August, regarding the Alaska trip and Mt. How'd it go?
That trip was great. The skiing was a minor part of a fishing trip, but the skiing was actually really good. By the way, that was a good example of hiking up on bare ground and then doing some skiing. I hiked for about two hours and skied for about five minutes. For anybody interested, here's the trip report.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
This winter when I get to the top of Lookout pass on the Idaho/Montana I will take some pics of the area I have in mind and post them.
I'd love to see them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

How did you like the BD Havocs, looked at them really close in Spokane the other day. They rent a Havoc setup with skins so may sample that this year. The spring ideas sound great and am planning already.
I liked them a lot. The ones I skied were 163cm (because I wanted something short that would fit easily in a ski bag) and they worked great. That pair - and some longer ones - are available to rent at Teton Village Sports.

It was a good, solid, substantial ski and I felt very comfortable on them. Matter of fact, I liked them so much that I sort of hung onto them for another month rather than return them to TVS. I used them for my September turns on Beartooth Pass.

This is them:





Fun ski.

Just don't tell anybody from Head that I said that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Me too, love corn snow, timing the snow is everything. Thanks Bob, see you in Feb. Pete
Roger that. I'm looking forward to it.
post #36 of 39
Thread Starter 

Trip

Thanks Bob, I missed that in September. Great fishing, hiking, Cariboo watching, turns, corn etc.

AND, to top that off it was all a write off. How cool.

Been raining pretty heavy here for the past week, the little snow we had up top is gone. Supposed to cool down in a few days so hopefully we will get some White.
post #37 of 39
Wow, what a great thread! Seriously. Its great to see encouragement of solo bc trips instead of the armchair quaterbacking that usually goes on in these types of threads
post #38 of 39
Hey Pete. What size is your foot?

I have various set ups you could try out. Come down this June and we can start out under the lifts on Bachelor after they close and move to the real mountains from there.
post #39 of 39
If your coming to Jackson, we might be able to find you something good and cheap like Bob said. I have at least two tele set ups with skins I might sell. I also have a rando set up I might loan.
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