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Too Much Skii or Too Good a Deal to Pass Up???

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
At a recent swap sale I found what I thought was a great deal for my wife, but now I wonder…

She’s 59, been skiing 40 years and I’d call her a strong intermediate to advanced skier. On our honeymoon many years ago she followed me down the cornice at Mammoth. But she no longer needs to “challenge” herself w/extreme steeps or moguls and now sticks mainly to groomers.

I’ve just returned to skiing myself (second-year NSP candidate) and last year she just loved to “borrow” my new skis – Nordica Doberman SL Pros w/165 mm and 13-m radius sidecut. BTW I’m 63 (a very young 63), 6’1 and 200 lbs.

She’s a very fit 5’8, 170 lbs and skis 8-12 days a year, the last 8-10 seasons on a pair of 170mm early parabolic Atomics. At our NSP swap sale I found what seemed to be a great deal – a pair of new/never skied Rossignol World Cup 9x (prob 2006-07 model) at 160 mm w/17 m radius sidecut.

At $99, they seemed a real steal but I didn’t realize til I got them home that the mounted bindings are (Rossi’s) Axiom Junior. Checking around today, I find I can replace them with an adult binding for $125, which still seems like a good deal.

Question: Is it worthwhile for me to get the new bindings, or is this a bad fit or too much ski for her?
post #2 of 10
will take some work to ski for sure, but it is a JR (softer) ski so should be OK still.

try it, spend the grandkids inheritance.....
post #3 of 10
I'm not familiar with the WC 9X.

The 9X Oversize was just an ordinary run-of-the mill plane jane ski. It's a ski; it works. Nothing special.

As to too much ski, I doubt it is, but does she or would she, ski at the design speed of the ski, or does she prefer slower speeds? If she skis at the speed the ski was made for she should be fine with it.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks, guys. Two responses:

Ski is not "Oversize" and, therefore, not a "plain Jane" ski. As I understand, the World Cup 9X is racing stock and (thus) marked "racing" and "FIS approved."

And it is NOT to my knowledge a "Junior" ski -- only Junior reference is on the bindings, not the ski. If ski were indeed "junior," wouldn't the ski itself carry some such designation?
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CycleBob View Post
I’ve just returned to skiing myself (second-year NSP candidate) and last year she just loved to “borrow” my new skis – Nordica Doberman SL Pros w/165 mm and 13-m radius sidecut. BTW I’m 63 (a very young 63), 6’1 and 200 lbs.

She’s a very fit 5’8, 170 lbs and skis 8-12 days a year, the last 8-10 seasons on a pair of 170mm early parabolic Atomics. At our NSP swap sale I found what seemed to be a great deal – a pair of new/never skied Rossignol World Cup 9x (prob 2006-07 model) at 160 mm w/17 m radius sidecut.

At $99, they seemed a real steal but I didn’t realize til I got them home that the mounted bindings are (Rossi’s) Axiom Junior. Checking around today, I find I can replace them with an adult binding for $125, which still seems like a good deal.

Question: Is it worthwhile for me to get the new bindings, or is this a bad fit or too much ski for her?
I take it you mean 160 cm?
Turn radius is 17 m?
Seems a bit too short for FIS racing ski, probably junior racing ski. Regardless, wether it is or is not a "FIS" racing ski is imho a mute point. The question is will she be skiing fast and making turns of between 17 and 8 m? If so then the ski will work for her. If she prefers to make smaller turns, say between 13 and 4 m, you may find yourself skiing these Rossis as she takes your Dobermans. Then again maybe your ready for a change of pace

EDIT: I just realized that if it is a junior racing ski it might not hold up to your weight at those speeds.
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CycleBob View Post
Thanks, guys. Two responses:

Ski is not "Oversize" and, therefore, not a "plain Jane" ski. As I understand, the World Cup 9X is racing stock and (thus) marked "racing" and "FIS approved."

And it is NOT to my knowledge a "Junior" ski -- only Junior reference is on the bindings, not the ski. If ski were indeed "junior," wouldn't the ski itself carry some such designation?
It's a junior ski because it's not race legal now (or in past years) for anyone over the age of 15. The minimum length and radius for a female adult GS ski is 175cm / 21m until it changes in 2009/2010.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CycleBob View Post
And it is NOT to my knowledge a "Junior" ski -- only Junior reference is on the bindings, not the ski. If ski were indeed "junior," wouldn't the ski itself carry some such designation?
9X = GS
9S = SL

If a 9X is 160cm, it's probably a junior ski. I'm not a race ski expert but believe that adult lengths for race stock 9X would be in the 180's for men and maybe mid 170's for women -- but most likely women in the 180 as well. No doubt someone here can confirm or correct.

No personal experience with this ski but bought a comparable 160 cm Atomic (junior) GS with the same topsheet and model number (10.22) as the adult 10.22 GS ski; was used for rec skiing by an older teenage girl, probably in the 130-140 lb. range.

That ski came with Look "junior" pivot bindings -- DIN 10. Look and Rossi are the same binding with diferent labels. I pulled those and mounted used them on my own skis for a couple of years - despite the "junior" label the shop was happy to mount for my 40-ish 170lb self and they've held my aging carcass to the boards, or released them as appropriate, just fine for a couple of years. I don't need a high DIN binding, I set them around 7. Which leads me to guess your Rossi "junior" bindings would do fine, assuming your wife's DIN setting is somewhere in the middle of the range.

Hopefully someone else will weigh in on this but my guess is its a junior ski and as a very fit skier at 170 lbs perhaps your wife would prefer a more substantial ski. OTOH the bindings should work fine. For what it's worth there's been a pair of Dynastar Ski Cross 9's listed on TGR (http://tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php?t=136920) for $50 that might do the trick and should work with the Rossi binding. The seller says they are 160 cm but its more likely 162 cm. The Ski Cross has a plate -- if your Rossi does not then this would be a beefier ski despite similar lengths.
post #8 of 10
I believe there can often be up to a 15 or 20 cm difference in recommended length for slalom and gs skis. If your wife enjoys your 165 SL's, than a 160 GS, IMHO just isn't going to cut it for her. Rather than too much ski, I think they aren't enough ski.

If they are in good shape you may be able to find a buyer in the youth racing world who would want them?
post #9 of 10

Wife Skis

Boy either you have a lot of guts or are just ..................(fill in the blank). I will not, do not buy skis for my wife, period. As a side note I might add I have been married to my skiing wife for 35 yrs.

Mammoth has a great demo program. go into the rental shop in the main lodge. they have a special demo program where for a reasonable fee ($25 - 5yrs ago) you can demo 4 pairs of skis a day. If she does that she will find a pair SHE likes and that is more important than $.
post #10 of 10
Definitely a jr model, not equivalent to the theory of skiing a stiff ski short; it's built for kids, not 170 lb adults who like SL skis. If you want new "old" skis for her, plenty around online for 2 benjamins. Female specific series like the Head Thangs or the Volkl Attivas would work well; they're light but strong. Lot of women like the Fischer carvers like the RX8 series, or I'd bet last year's Blizzard carvers would work well for her in shorter lengths.

If you want to go in the original direction, most companies make a detuned "SLR," "RS" or "SC" type ski that's plenty for most mortals outside the gates. Again, she would take something in the low to middle 160's if it's derived from a SL, high 160's to low 170's if from a GS. These will be more demanding - and offer higher performance - than recreational carvers; you need to decide how focused she wants to be for her carves, how fast she likes to operate (as opposed to what you'd like to see her do). And if she doesn't carve all the time, then first paragraph applies even more...
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