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Keeping in shape while healing a broken toe

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Sunday I was playing a tough soccer game and got a hard kick on my right foot. I went to the podiatrist today and the diagnosis is a broken big toe, my first sports injury ever. He taped it, gave me a surgical boot, and told me it will take about 6 weeks to heal. There goes my early season skiing

My question is how can I keep in somewhat decent shape while not putting any pressure on the toe. I realize that most aerobic activities are ruled out, but how about upper body and core strengthening? Is the stability ball my best friend now?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by simonbda View Post
Sunday I was playing a tough soccer game and got a hard kick on my right foot. I went to the podiatrist today and the diagnosis is a broken big toe, my first sports injury ever. He taped it, gave me a surgical boot, and told me it will take about 6 weeks to heal. There goes my early season skiing

My question is how can I keep in somewhat decent shape while not putting any pressure on the toe. I realize that most aerobic activities are ruled out, but how about upper body and core strengthening? Is the stability ball my best friend now?
I had toe surgery 2 years ago in which they broke my toe.I found that I could ride the stationary bike and climb stairs easily.The boot kept the pressure off my toe.
Another thing you could do is up the intensity of your upper body and core workouts-maximum repititions with very little rest between sets.

T
post #3 of 12
Unless you have a lot of swelling, there should be no reason not to ski. Nothing is more rigid than a ski boot. You might have to take it easy, but a few early season turns shouldn't put a lot of pressure on that toe. You might ask the boot guys their opinion.

Did your doc actually give you specific activity restrictions?
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Unless you have a lot of swelling, there should be no reason not to ski. Nothing is more rigid than a ski boot. You might have to take it easy, but a few early season turns shouldn't put a lot of pressure on that toe. You might ask the boot guys their opinion.

Did your doc actually give you specific activity restrictions?
The problem here is getting your foot in the boot.I did this before my toe was ready and I think it set my healing time back.

T
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcarey View Post
The problem here is getting your foot in the boot.I did this before my toe was ready and I think it set my healing time back.

T
This is exactly what I'm trying to avoid. Early season turns are not worth a nagging injury for the rest of the season. The doc recommendation was to keep the toe wrapped and to use the surgical boot to avoid the movement of the joint on the toe, which is where the fracture is. I guess I'll start experimenting with the machines to see which ones don't apply any pressure on the foot.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcarey View Post
The problem here is getting your foot in the boot. I did this before my toe was ready and I think it set my healing time back.

T
I hear you. I did it and emptied the entire condo. I'm not sure what I said or how loudly I said it, but it scared everyone off!

Six weeks isn't too long ... you aren't missing the good stuff, anyway. Bicycling is good, especially on a stationary (for the first few weeks), but running is out. Swimming hurt, too.

Good luck!
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Unless you have a lot of swelling, there should be no reason not to ski. Nothing is more rigid than a ski boot. You might have to take it easy, but a few early season turns shouldn't put a lot of pressure on that toe.
I'm not so sure.

Even though a ski boot is rigid, there is still much movement, pressure, and articulation of the ankle and foot joints during skiing, including all the toe joints.

Depending on the boots, just putting them on can aggravate or re-aggravate a broken toe, especially the big toe.

I'd be very hesitant about skiing with a broken big toe.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. As Segbrown said, I'm not gonna be missing the good stuff. I'd rather delay the start of my season for 2-3 weeks than having problems later on.
post #9 of 12
The first time I broke a big toe, I took it easy for a month, babied it, etcetera. The second time (other big toe) I did nothing special, even got 2nd place in Brown Belt fighting at the tournament three days later. Both toes healed up the same. Other than trying not to kick anything with your toe for the next couple of weeks, just Forgetaboutit.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by simonbda View Post
Thanks for the advice. As Segbrown said, I'm not gonna be missing the good stuff. I'd rather delay the start of my season for 2-3 weeks than having problems later on.
Well, so much for delaying my first time on the snow . I went skiing yesterday and other than sore quads I had no problems at all. If anything, it kept me out of the backseat because everytime I had to recover the big toe would touch the top of the boot and that felt a bit uncomfortable. Who knew, a broken toe is good for your skiing technique
post #11 of 12
Shimano makes some nice cleated bike sandals. I got a pair after cutting the crap out of a toe at the beach.

Glad to hear you are skiing though.
post #12 of 12

been there, done that

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Shimano makes some nice cleated bike sandals. I got a pair after cutting the crap out of a toe at the beach.

Glad to hear you are skiing though.
Bingo.

Actually, any rigid-sole bike shoe will have the protection of a ski boot.

Swimming + catching the thing on bed covers := maxximum pain.
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