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Yoga and skiing what do you think?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
hi all,

Just a quick question....has anyone been to a yoga class while away on there sking vacation?

i am a yoga teacher and i moved to the mountains in bulgaria and will be spending my first ski season here. I am thinking of continuing my classes into the season and would like some feed back of positive and negative experiences anyone here may have had so i can give the best service possible..

All the best Haze
post #2 of 28
+1 on yoga and skiing.

The only time I've ever done classes after a ski day was in Mammoth in the spring--the slopes closed at 1 for slushiness, and there were classes at 3. It felt great, completely rejuvenating, and I would do it more IF it didn't involve not catching the last chair--so I think evening yoga classes at a ski resort would rock, but you won't find me in a class while the lifts are running.
post #3 of 28
I don't suggest doing yoga while skiing
post #4 of 28
Best yoga teachers, are in my experience, the ones who are highly skilled yet humble and patient with it. The ability to guide people through the different asanas by giving simple and clear key focus points to concentrate on. A lot like good ski instructors. And unlike faber when I start to lose it and end up on one ski, I'm thinking I am doing yoga and skiing.
post #5 of 28
Another two thumbs up on combining yoga after your day of skiing. Great way to recover after a hard day of skiing. Always a lot harder then it looks. Enjoy your ski season.
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the imput. So i will be putting the classes on around 6.30 in the evening so i hope that will be a good time for all. And yoga while skiing would be challanging ! When i get a chance i will post up some info on asanas/postures connected with ski movements, doing all the research a present. Thanks again and all the best. Haze
post #7 of 28
+++ Yoga + Skiing. I would rather go straight after skiing as a sort of warm down than dinner time for us Scots (6.30).
post #8 of 28
I used to do the bikram bit after a day skinnin' around.

Felt great.

Bikram yoga folks are a little wierd.

The beer after all that worked really well.
post #9 of 28
IMO more flexibility in the hip joints gives you more protection for your knees. If you are a serious off piste skier you will put your body through stressed positions that you do not normally encounter in non-skiing life, so anything you can do (like yoga) to improve strength and flexibility will make you a better skier and less prone to injury.

I believe that if you are an aging skier and do not engage in some kind of serious streaching program you are asking for problems. I'm 57 and can ski big bumps at Telluide all day without taking Advil, unlike almost everyone I ski with that are much younger. I attribute that in large part to a mellow yoga program that is just composed of streaching on the floor.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by faber View Post
I don't suggest doing yoga while skiing
But, skiing is Yoga!

I spent an evening with an advanced Yoga instructor talking aout the similarities. Especially interesting was the idea of attaining a position in perfect balance and letting the force of gravity flow though you.
post #11 of 28
Keep in mind that a recent study showed increased flexibility at the knee from stretching actually hindered running performance, required more effort because less stretch reflex. Can't speak for skiing movements, which are different.

Also keep in mind that one theory why women have a higher rate of ACL damage in basketball is that estrogen makes their ligaments/tendons more flexible, so less support during quick cuts and stops. Again, can't precisely extrapolate, but implication is that too much flexibility = instability, not injury prevention.

I'd go for weight bearing exercises that load the big flexors and extenders, like bicycling, over Yoga. Just my .02...
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Keep in mind that a recent study showed increased flexibility at the knee from stretching actually hindered running performance, required more effort because less stretch reflex. Can't speak for skiing movements, which are different.

Also keep in mind that one theory why women have a higher rate of ACL damage in basketball is that estrogen makes their ligaments/tendons more flexible, so less support during quick cuts and stops. Again, can't precisely extrapolate, but implication is that too much flexibility = instability, not injury prevention.

I'd go for weight bearing exercises that load the big flexors and extenders, like bicycling, over Yoga. Just my .02...

Here's my .02...weight-bearing, stretching, agility, cardio, and balance should all be incorporated in your workouts, or dry-land-training.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Again, can't precisely extrapolate, but implication is that too much flexibility = instability, not injury prevention.
So the implication from that statement is that the best training to prevent injury for highly active sports is to sit on the couch and become less flexible, which results in more statility and therefore less injury. I imagine this would work until you lost so much flexiblity that you couldn't get off the couch.
post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 
corr thanks all,
All the info is very use full for me as it gives me an idea of the attitude that skiers have to yoga.
Guest 1 I agree that yoga and skiing has a similar effect on mind body and soul. Freeing the mind from the hassle and inter chit chat of the monkey mind. Bliss!
And thanks Mud foot well put sir you fine Gravity Alchemist. Because yoga engages the muscles in isometric as well as concentric eccentric contractions the muscles gain in strength as well as the joints in flexibility, also as holding our own body weight is a safe balanced method way to train it holds great benefits in comparison to blastin out in the gym which i have learnt as a personal trainer as well as a yoga teacher.
Thanks again to everyone for your comments.
All the best haze
post #15 of 28
Mark Abma claims to do yoga almost every day.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Keep in mind that a recent study showed increased flexibility at the knee from stretching actually hindered running performance, required more effort because less stretch reflex. Can't speak for skiing movements, which are different.

Also keep in mind that one theory why women have a higher rate of ACL damage in basketball is that estrogen makes their ligaments/tendons more flexible, so less support during quick cuts and stops. Again, can't precisely extrapolate, but implication is that too much flexibility = instability, not injury prevention.

I'd go for weight bearing exercises that load the big flexors and extenders, like bicycling, over Yoga. Just my .02...
Exactly!!! Especially for women, who already tend to be hyper-mobile. I taught that stuff when I was back in college. Every day, I thank my kinesiology professor for warning me that if I continued to do so, I would never have a fitness career. That was over 25 years ago, and I've only had one serious injury in my entire fitness/skiing career.

You need to think about the functionality of yoga. So we really get off the lift, stand at the top of the hill, perform the tree pose and chant Om Shanti, Shanti, Shanti Om!! Goodness gracious, I hope not! Skiing involves dynamic balance.

As far as Bikram is concerned, why would anyone train in a hot environment when their main sport often happens in sub-zero weather? Besides, no offense, but Bikram people have really bad body odors!

I gotta' say though, I really love yoga. About 90 percent of my post-rehab fitness clients have been injured from yoga, as opposed to skiing- and this is in Summit County Colorado.
post #17 of 28
I've been doing Yoga for over 30 years and skiing for 40. I would be careful about going to a Yoga class while skiing, because many 1 hr full classes can be very rigorous. A lot of it depends on how you ski. But if you ski all day and are fairly aggressive then really what your body needs mainly is to "rest" at night, not some vigorous class, and God no, NO 1.5 hr HOT YOGA classes.

I watch my roommate do push ups at night and it seem so completely silly to be exercising vigorously on a long day on the slopes. The body needs to REST on a ski trip.

If you are a Yoga teacher then it would be very beneficial and no problem for you to do a short 20 minute series of poses at night. Every single year I go through the same routine, I wake up in the middle of night, because I sleep poorly at altitude(even SLC) and time change, exhaustion, and I do about 20-30 minutes and it hurts so much because I ski very aggressively all day and am not really used to it. I then go back to sleep and I know the Yoga gets the bad stuff out of my muscles.

I do a few Yoga stretches most days of my life and find it extremely beneficial. I'm a tight, bulky pollack and have no worry about overstretching my ligaments. Also, I am a Chiropractor by trade and daily see the effects of limited mobility because of tight muscles and ligaments as people enter their 50.'s especially.

Everyone here should learn the basic series of forward and backward bend, side-bends and rotation for the spine. You don't need a "class" to do Yoga. (although you need one to learn it at first).
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post
I do a few Yoga stretches most days of my life and find it extremely beneficial. I'm a tight, bulky pollack and have no worry about overstretching my ligaments. Also, I am a Chiropractor by trade and daily see the effects of limited mobility because of tight muscles and ligaments as people enter their 50.'s especially.
Ah ha! First off, the majority of people of people who go to a chiropractor choose to do so because of tight muscles and limited mobility. People with hyper-mobility have different issues, which don't usually involve a chiropractor. Therefore, it stands to reason that these folks would perhaps benefit from a yoga program. However, I would be more likely to suggest foam roller
flexibility, or a dynamic flexibility program such as tai chi.

It's funny that you mention the tight, bulky pollack thing. Back in college, my kinesiology teacher put me and this weight lifter bulky guy in front of the class. He showed everyone how I could bend in all these unnatural positions, whereas the muscle head had zero mobility. Then, he turned to the class and said, "she should be doing strength training and he needs yoga."
post #19 of 28
I find people always stare at me when I ski in those tight little pants.
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
yet again big big thanks and respect for such detailed and informative posts. A fine crew of people here indeed all comments have been taken on board. I do get upset to hear about so many injuries related to yoga but there are a lot of teachers out there that have not studied anatomy and physiology and spend most of their time at the front of the class showing off rather than observing and correcting in a gentle calm manner. I too have clients come to me with injuries for all sorts of causes and also some clients that have done yoga for years with very bad habits, a good yoga teacher must be able to see the muscles in action in their minds eye to save guard against poor alignment. I have been blessed to study kung fu and other martial arts from a young age, then a nurse, personal trainer and now a yoga teacher and have also had good and bad teachers in all of these fields so i understand snowbirds concerns. The size of the ego is often the giveaway of a good teacher. Thanks again all, top notch forum will be recommending to others this season.
post #21 of 28
Hazool, as someone who teaches fitness near the ski areas, and even taught a ski fitness week, there's something else to consider. Quite often, people have spent their last penny of their ski vacation, and thus do not have extra class to pay for classes. Additionally, some people want to simply break their normal patterns while they're away. So if they do yoga or any other type of exercise while they're at home, they may not want to do it on vacation.

For this reason, I would suggest that you work out of a hotel or a resort, rather than getting into a situation where you have to pay rent for space.

Good luck
post #22 of 28

And another thing . . .

An instructor for Extremely Canadian at Whistler was once trying to explain the ready/balanced position we should be in and he said "do you know what I mean if I say 'activate your mula banda?'"
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Corr i do love the feedback here and respect the energy being put in. Cheers Lisamarie ...I am in a location where at present i have small over heads due to living in the apartment block where i use the space here and so far my classes have called in good business for the bar and name of the block not sure how long this will last but going with the flow and i am only asking bulgarian prices of 10 leva per 1.5 hour class which is about £3 engish pounds so good value all round for me and the block.
Cometjo yep mula banda is the base lock and i am sure you have used it many times when a toilet has not been avaible. Its a lift of the perinium or a grip of the cercival walls. Creates inner strengh and balance also connects the body to the earth in more ways than one...
Thanks again all
Cheers haze
post #24 of 28
yoga is good for anything and everything.
post #25 of 28
Of all the conditioning activities we do, Yoga is #1.

It builds strength, agility and inner smoothness.

If I don't do it before skiing, I feel stiff and sore.

If I do it, I feel light, fluid and youthful.

It only takes 10-15 min for a light set of Asanas.

Combine this with an Ayurvedic hot oil massage, and it feels like you've shed 30 years.
post #26 of 28

sellection of what works, age variables

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Keep in mind that a recent study showed increased flexibility at the knee from stretching actually hindered running performance,.
there are aspects of yoga that work for me. ie: back and neck stretching positions. also, core strength exercises can be combined.I avoid knee and hip stretches. note: the positions yogis aspire to do not resemble the requirements of off piste skiing. speed, like meditation, will silence the internal dialogue very effectively.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
So the implication from that statement is that the best training to prevent injury for highly active sports is to sit on the couch and become less flexible, which results in more statility and therefore less injury. I imagine this would work until you lost so much flexiblity that you couldn't get off the couch.
Definitely one approach to training. But, naw, implication is nothing like that. Conclusion is just what I paraphrased, that too much flexibility may be as bad or worse than too little. I suggested bicycling, last time I checked it was a touch different than watching Gossip Girls. May be wrong.
post #28 of 28
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