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Completing the Quiver - need a 'western' ski.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I get to ski out west for 10-15 days a year.

Most of the time I'm too hungover to get up early enough for the good powder, so I end up skiing in the moguls and powder piles created by tore up runs.

I like the inbounds tree runs a lot because I can still find some untracked powder there a few days after a big snow dump.

When I do get to powder, I'm not very good at it. To stay up on my current ski I gotta lean back and this burns my quads and goes against everything I've been taught.
At least once a trip I go over the handlebars. It is really an effort and I don't want to become a closet powder hater.

I know my technique could improve and I plan on taking lessons the next time out, but I'd like to see if changing to a ski more suitable for these conditions will help too.

So I'm looking for that 'out west' ski that will occasionally hit fresh deep powder.

I've done a little bit of research and I have my eye on some 184 Snoop Daddy's, either this year's (94mm) or last years (88mm), but I would welcome some other suggestions before pulling the trigger on those.

Me: 175lbs, 5'11", male, 32 years old.
Skiing Experience: 25 years 'eastern powder' skiing experience.
(groomed ice, boilerplate, dirt, rocks, moguls.)

Skiing Activities: Ski Patroller, weekly beer league / nastar racer, 2 to 3 weeks a year 'out west.'

Skiing Styles: good: carving, mogul. bad: powder

Current Quiver:
Race: 2006 Atomic GS11 183cm / Atomic Plug 150 Boots

Patrol/General Purpose: 2006 Atomic Supercross SX:Ti 168cm / Atomic Hawx 90 - These are the suckers I gotta fight with in the powder, 114/72/102.

What should I be looking for in a third ski that that will be good in 'powder moguls' and even better when I get up early enough to hit some of those inbound spots before they are skied out?

Much thanks.
post #2 of 10
given your strength and experience, you want what i call a "powder scavaging ski." basically, a big mountain freeride ski with a raceroom-type construction (i.e., vertically laminated layers of wood, glass and metal). these will float well in all but the DEEPEST of snow, DESTROY crud, hold an edge on any new-snow-day groomer, and will handle bumps alright. you're going to want a longer (high 180's to low 190's cm) ski with a waist somewhere between 105mm and about 115mm with a long radius sidecut (and traditional sidecut and camber). the obvious choices are the 187cm or 194cm dynastar xxl (i have owned both. i have nearly identical specs to you and the 187 was better for an all-around soft-snow ski, but the 194 was plenty maneuverable given the skis obvious intent) or the 191 movement goliath. if you ski 150 plug boots and atomic race skis, you might even be up for the 189 rossi b-squad, which is a considerable step up from the other two skis in straight-lining burliness. if you want to do bumps, though, i would stick with the first two.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply! I'll definitely look into those.
post #4 of 10
Demo some Gotamas. 190cm
post #5 of 10
Well, often agree with lukc, not this time. Wouldn't pick the XXL for my first choice in trees, left over bits. Not that it can't DO trees, just not what it shines at.

My call: Something light in the mid 90's-low 100's with a raised tail or twin. If you like Atomic, the new wider Snoops. Watea 94's also fit the bill. Mantras' taper is nice to slide in tight spaces, metal makes them slay stiff crud/chop. If you want a surfier feel, Goats to rock in trees, chop, and they'll handle the rare morning you actually get up in time for real pow...
post #6 of 10
im in a very similar situation -- i just moved out west and need something that can handle the variable conditions and maneuver in deeper snow. in addition to the xxl, watea 94s, and mantras suggested above, i'm also considering:

Rossi S6 Koopman
Moment Ruby
PM Gear Bro 188

they are all traditional sidecut skis, with waists wide enough to float in powder, but are far more capable of handling the whole mountain than dedicated powder skis.

i'll probably end up with the xxl's in 187.
post #7 of 10
I'll add Line Prophet 100 to the list...
post #8 of 10
At age 32 you're typically too hungover to ski early?....really??

In any case there are three general positions in the world wide quiver.

#1 Ain't snowed lately (you have two of these)
#2 Middle ground. Snowed a little or snowed two days ago. (like the Snoops you asked about)
#3 Snowed a lot, snowing a lot, gonna snow a lot.

The skis that you first mentioned are in position #2 (great choices BTW, esp the '09 Snoop). Many of the suggestions you have gotten are in position #3 (great suggestions too if that's what you want). Which is it that you think you want??

BTW: for someone that describes themselves thusly........
Quote:
When I do get to powder, I'm not very good at it. To stay up on my current ski I gotta lean back and this burns my quads and goes against everything I've been taught. At least once a trip I go over the handlebars. It is really an effort and I don't want to become a closet powder hater.
....I don't think I'd recommend a real agressive ski.

SJ
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
At age 32 you're typically too hungover to ski early?....really??
Half serious on that one, I'm from Wisconsin.... I'm used to spending more time on the chairlift than I am the run, so
by the end of a day out west my legs are jelly. (Another
reason I'm not looking for a massive ski.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
In any case there are three general positions in the world wide quiver.

#1 Ain't snowed lately (you have two of these)
#2 Middle ground. Snowed a little or snowed two days ago. (like the Snoops you asked about)
#3 Snowed a lot, snowing a lot, gonna snow a lot.
You're right, I am sort of going for #2, which would sort of mean a 50/50 ski and why I was leaning toward the fatter snoops. Much of my out west experience is in the later season, spring break/march break, which means less than ideal powder conditions.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
After looking at everyone's suggestions, I ended up compromising and buying the Snoops since those
seem less of an aggressive ski than the rest.

Thanks for your help.

(ebay slightly used $623, shipped, with bindings.)
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