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post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Its been 13yrs since i last visited the slopes... my wife and i are taking a ski trip w/ some "experienced" friends in january... we will be going to winter park, and cant wait!!! i guess my question is regarding lessons... neither me or my wife feel that we need to take lessons... i guess we figure that since our friends have gone twice a year for the last 15+ years, i would assume that we could get the help we need while on the slopes??? im a bit risky, and am being convinced to make our way to the top of the mountain (first thing) via greens/blues/and maybe a black??? a bit worried, but what the heck.... any opinions on lessons (maybe 1/2 day), or just wing it and use what i remember from years past....
post #2 of 18
First, are you planning to use your own equipment that is 13 or more years old? If you've got boots that are comfortable, & not rear entry or the soles worn too badly you "might" be okay with them. I would suggest renting modern skis though.

Next I would say take a few warm-up runs on the easiest short slope you can find, just to see what your body remembers. The only reason I say this is that it will help determine where you can start in a lesson. It is sometimes difficult for a Ski School Supervisor to figure out what level to place someone in your situation. Either way I would highly recommend a lesson early on your first day (a private would be best if you are anxious to get moving & out on your own quickly). Even if your technique doesn't get a lot better you gain valuable information about the mountain & where you will enjoy skiing the most. After the lesson you will have a much better idea about whether you want more, what kind of equipment upgrades you should make & what terrain will suit you best. Ask lots of questions, starting here!

JF
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
i will be renting equipment...
post #4 of 18
You will remember, it will come back to you. But you will be a much happier skier with the newer gear....this was my experience after a 15+ year hiatus (and I wasnt even very good back then). I didnt take a lesson but did fall a lot till I got the hang of things again, took one weekend to actually start to do what one would consider "skiing".

Oh almost forgot, I was assisted by freinds who did ski well though, it helped build my confidence by having them ski with me, but ultimately it was on my own time that through practice I was able to once again ski.
post #5 of 18
I did a similar thing back in 1997. I hadn't skied in 25 years and came back to the sport. I tried it by myself. No joy. Then I rented equipment, and took a lesson. The lesson was well worth it. It pointed out things I had forgotten and taught me how the new equipment works. I got hooked again.

So, take the lesson. It will save you a bunch of pain.
post #6 of 18
Rental gear. I'm sure that there are some on this board who can steer you to a good shop to get rental gear.

Renting gear from "Cut Rate Harry" or at the hill is probably going to mean that the last time the skis saw wax or had an edge was when Billy Clinton was playing hide the cigar in the Oval Orifice.

Your friends are not instructors. Take an hour semi-private with your wife and get a good foundation on the shaped ski ... no more hoppin' like a bunny ... got that?

Start another post on where to rent .. and concentrate on boots too. Plastic breaks down over time and thirteen years is a lot of time. That haze on the car windows is plastic gassing off .... same for boots, they become brittle especially in the cold and I've seen a few split like a dropped melon. Now if the boot comes apart when you are in motion ... think about that.
post #7 of 18
Yuki wrote:
>>Your friends are not instructors. Take an hour semi-private with your wife and get a good foundation on the shaped ski ... no more hoppin' like a bunny ... got that?<<
The equipment chanched a lot the last 13 years!
You will have to adjust to what is called "carving" on
"carve-ski's". Being ski's with a lot more sidecut then you were used to, they will feel like they will catch an edge very soon.
So, take a few hours of private-lessons to adjust to this new equipment and you will enjoy your trip a lot more!
Also do some reading on "
http://forums.epicski.com/forumdisplay.php?f=73
So you'll now what to look for when renting boots.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Rental gear. I'm sure that there are some on this board who can steer you to a good shop to get rental gear.

Renting gear from "Cut Rate Harry" or at the hill is probably going to mean that the last time the skis saw wax or had an edge was when Billy Clinton was playing hide the cigar in the Oval Orifice.

Your friends are not instructors. Take an hour semi-private with your wife and get a good foundation on the shaped ski ... no more hoppin' like a bunny ... got that?

Start another post on where to rent .. and concentrate on boots too. Plastic breaks down over time and thirteen years is a lot of time. That haze on the car windows is plastic gassing off .... same for boots, they become brittle especially in the cold and I've seen a few split like a dropped melon. Now if the boot comes apart when you are in motion ... think about that.
I agree with 95% of this except do not take the lesson WITH your wife, each take your own. With your wife will put undue strain on her and the instructor.
post #9 of 18
Agree with Phil. Remember, I just retired and think of every penny .... my wife makes me do that.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Your friends are not instructors. Take an hour semi-private with your wife and get a good foundation on the shaped ski ... no more hoppin' like a bunny ... got that?
Not only that, but your friends are there to enjoy themselves as well and teaching others to ski when you're not an instructor isn't much fun. Yuki is right on with his advice as usual.
post #11 of 18
The vast majority of people who come back into the sport and are transitioning from straight skis will be using a technique that works against what shaped skis are designed to do. Sure, you will be able to get down the slope, but will be working much harder than you need to and missing out on a lot of fun. Rent some good-quality current equipment (the Winter Park village will have this). Let a pro introduce you to movement patterns and the technique that will optimize your day and give you a good foundation to build on. He/she will likely see things in your technique that are easily adjusted to maximize your experience. Consider it a coaching session instead of a lesson. Tiger Woods has a coach, after all. No matter how accomplished a skier is, it's always good to have a pro do a checkup on your technique occasionally. After all, you're on the slopes to have fun; why use more effort than you need to?! (Besides, it's nice to have someone who knows the mountain guiding you around!)

Friends are fine, but they're not trained to see what a pro sees. Besides, as COSkGirl points out, they're there to enjoy skiing, not teach.

Good luck!
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post
Not only that, but your friends are there to enjoy themselves as well and teaching others to ski when you're not an instructor isn't much fun. Yuki is right on with his advice as usual.

That is true....I recall a bit of impatience at times from my friends.....fortunately I was up there with 3 guys, they basically took turns helping me out.
post #13 of 18
Do not take lessons from friends. It hurts your friendship and you get bad lessons.

Take a lesson. It's not like riding a bike. Even if you "remember" how to do it, equipment and techniques have changed rapidly over the past 2 decades. It is much easier for a skier to ski well now; it is to your advantage to move quickly up that learning curve to where skiing is more enjoyable.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by soonercrew View Post
Its been 13yrs since i last visited the slopes... my wife and i are taking a ski trip w/ some "experienced" friends in january... we will be going to winter park, and cant wait!!! i guess my question is regarding lessons... neither me or my wife feel that we need to take lessons
You mention that you have skied before, and that you are somewhat ok with taking risks. How about your wife? And what was your level of aptitude before your 13 year hiatus?

IF you can take a lesson or even just get out on skis at a local hill before your vacation to take a few runs, by all means do so.

Don't push your wife faster than she wants to go. If she's the one pushing you...suck it up and be a man.
post #15 of 18
I did break the rule one time. I never gave a lesson to my wife, nor my kids.

I did give a lesson to my work partner, a close associate of course.

It worked out quite well ..... since he also called me .. boss!

He had to do what I told him .... how could he say no?

It's been about six years and lots of free privates of course since that first group he was in. Normally, I wouldn't have done this but knowing him through work, as a person who follows directions well ... I made the exception.
post #16 of 18
Hey, welcome to Epicski, SoonerCrew! And welcome back to skiing.

There's a pattern developing here, and I'll add another voice to the same advice you've already gotten. You've heard it from instructors and non-instructors alike: take a lesson (or several), and don't take lessons from your friends. Find a respected instructor and sign on.

You have a great opportunity right now, and one that you won't have again: You have the chance to start out right.

All of your old skills will come back, as soon as your confidence in them returns. And those old skills will still work, even though today's equipment can do so much more with so much less.

But those "old skills" include both bad habits and good. Since you've been off your skis for a good while, it's easy right now to "groove" the habits of great, contemporary skiing, and to eliminate bad habits. You get good at whatever you practice, so unless you just want to get "good" at the same old bad or outdated habits, take a lesson, first thing! (I do agree that it wouldn't hurt to go out on the beginner hill, or something at least several notches below what you think you used to be comfortable on, for a run or two. That will give you some information that your instructor can use to start you out right, and get you into the right group. For private lessons, it won't hurt to take the lesson right out of the chute.)

The point has been made that it's asking a lot of friends to expect them to teach you on their own valuable ski time. But even they love teaching, there are very, very few skiers on the mountain--even among those whose friends think are "good skiers"--who have the eye or the understanding of good ski technique to teach it. Fewer still have the experience with teaching methodologies to teach it well, even if they do understand it. The short of it: you will reinforce bad habits, unless you find a good, current instructor.

If your friends haven't had any good coaching in a while, after a very short time, you'll be able to give them good advice!

Whatever you do, though, please stick around here at EpicSki. I'd love to hear about how it goes. Maybe we'll meet on the hill sometime.

Enjoy!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
i want to thank you all for the great advice!!! ive decided to go ahead and take a private lesson... bright and early at 8am on day 1!!! my wife claims she is ready to go hit the blacks already, lol...jk... she will be joining me!!! i will probably only take the one lesson, hoping that will be enough to get me back in the game... if i need more, ill do so... we have spent the last 2 weeks planning out our first trip down and up and down the mountain... DANG!!!! wish it were already january!!!
thanks to all!!!!
post #18 of 18
Enjoy!!
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