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I'm a new Skiier and I'm looking to buy my first pair of Skis, boots, and poles! - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Thread Starter 
Thanks every one! I'll keep looking around for some used ski shops! I'll ask my uncle too, he's a huge skiier!
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Cassina, without trying to be too critical of your post, I have to question your technical background. I fear that there is much that you need to learn. I would also like to add that I'd never advise a beginner to have their parents adjust their bindings based on shop advise, and most (reputable)shops wouldn't advise a consumer to alter their binding set up.

As to the comment about many skis being integrated, while many manufacturers offer a significant line of integrated ski/binding set ups, there are still many that are not integrated, and some manufacturers(Blizzard comes to mind) are working on integrated systems that will take more than one binding model/brand.
I have been skiing for 17 years so consider myself reasonabily
confident with my ability to set my bindings. If I had been wrong with my setting methods I am sure I would have stuffed my knees years ago. The only thing I would not attempt to do is repair them and with 2 pairs of Marker M48 bindings that broke open when I put my ski boot in I replaced them as they had had plenty of use anyway.
I come from NZ and we possibly do not have as much choice
as you do in the States with regard to the number of skis sold
without integrated bindings. The only skis sold in NZ without bindings that I have seen are Twin Tip and Touring Skis.
Us New Zealanders are known as "Do it Yourselfers" so this could explain why I do my own binding setting.
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Get some Looks. Have them adjusted to the proper setting for your weight, age and ability, then be confident that they'll come off in pow, boilerplate or whatever.

I also have a technical background, but don't know all the details regarding binding design and materials that the designer used (I can fathom a fairly good guess however), so I go with their recommendations, which you should also suggest, particularly to a newbe.

If someone overestimates his abilities for the sake of gnar points in the liftline, and gets his binding adjusted with that information, well, my sympathy level is minimal.
2 of my skis have Look bindings. 1 pair is Pivot Jib which is a
turntable heel and the other is FX12. When I am skiing and falling I am unable to tell the difference between Marker and
Look. I tend to ski on long 177cm to 205 cm skis and when I fall
I fall on the tail 99% of the time. I have between 0 and 3 falls
per skiing day and rarely have binding release falls but have had
no knee twist whether the bindings have released or not. Skiing on Mid Fat skis prevents knee twist falls on soft heavy snow days for me.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoWork View Post
Words of a wise sage, right there... Good one Prickly!

Get yourself fit up for the best damn boots you can afford. Get last year's models, they'll be alot cheaper. Then demo skis before you buy them. They're like fingerprints or sonwflakes or whatever- they're all very different. Find what fits your style, or lack thereof. Once you figure out what kind of skiing you like to do, you can fill in the blanks with the rest of your gear.

Welcome to Epic, dude- I'm sure you'll grow into your new hobby and the forums alike! Keep that subie running clean!
I think buying the best boots you can afford is a waste of money for a beginner as from my own experience if I had brought expert or intermediate boots as first boots they would
have still been too big for me once I had progressed to a longer
ski and skiing at faster speeds. My first boots were rear entry
Salomon SX41 which was a popular rental boot in the early 1990s and as a beginner I was looking for a comfortable fit.
When you are a beginner you don't have any understanding
of what the term "packing out" means but it is better to get an understanding of what packing out means in $100 boots than
$600 boots.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassina View Post
I think buying the best boots you can afford is a waste of money for a beginner as from my own experience if I had brought expert or intermediate boots as first boots they would
have still been too big for me once I had progressed to a longer
ski and skiing at faster speeds. My first boots were rear entry
Salomon SX41 which was a popular rental boot in the early 1990s and as a beginner I was looking for a comfortable fit.
When you are a beginner you don't have any understanding
of what the term "packing out" means but it is better to get an understanding of what packing out means in $100 boots than
$600 boots.
But a beginner will have an understanding in the inner workings of a ski binding and knowledge to adjust them?

What they are saying about the boot, is not to shortcut a boot and get the best that you can afford for them. Any reputable shop here is the states will not put a beginner in the most expensive race boots but the best boot for that person to grow into and with.
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
But a beginner will have an understanding in the inner workings of a ski binding and knowledge to adjust them?

What they are seeing about the boot, is not to shortcut a boot and get the best that you can afford for them. Any reputable shop here is the states will not put a beginner in the most expensive race boots but the best boot for that person to grow into and with.
Agree completely. With the right boots, many more options open up while ski shopping.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassina View Post
I think buying the best boots you can afford is a waste of money for a beginner as from my own experience if I had brought expert or intermediate boots as first boots they would
have still been too big for me once I had progressed to a longer
ski and skiing at faster speeds. My first boots were rear entry
Salomon SX41 which was a popular rental boot in the early 1990s and as a beginner I was looking for a comfortable fit.
When you are a beginner you don't have any understanding
of what the term "packing out" means but it is better to get an understanding of what packing out means in $100 boots than
$600 boots.


I said last year's boots. Maybe the year before if you can find them and money is real tight. A top-of-the-line intermediate boot from last year's run could be had for realistically between $175-$200 and provide YEARS of enjoyment. I'd say probably rent the first 2-3 times to make sure you don't hate it, then try to find a real set of boots recommended by a GOOD BOOT FITTER and build from there. Once he figures out what kind of skiing he likes to do, we can help him find a set of planks and some gear too. Regardless of what you KNOW about boots, the advantages to having good equipment are apparent to even the likes of Helen Keller, who I hear had the ski shop adjust her bindings when she was a beginner.
post #38 of 59
Since you live in Wisconsin SubaruDude check out Granite Peak's website and go under events and specials. They are a doing a Ski Youth program this year on Dec. 7, 14, and 21. Cost is $10 for lesson lift ticket, $10 for Rental (if you need it), and you get a free lesson. If you do it again on one of the following times they only charge you $5 for lift ticket and rentals. I believe the lift ticket though is only good in the learning area. They have a chair lift that goes about 1/3 up the hill, then they have a magic carpet, and rope toe w/handles. But hey for Dec 7th in Wisconsin that would be a cheap day on the hill and get the basics of skiing down.

For gear check out your local YMCA website or some other YMCA websites in your area. I know the two Y's in my area hold ski swap days (coming up very quick). Green Bay has a huge one that is coming up pretty quick here. Lots of shops in the state and UP show up and sell off back stock and rental skis. They also have there sales people there so you can talk to someone with some knowledge. People also sell there own equipment there too. I've gone a few times and they always have a great selection. People come from all over the state to that one. Basically a whole gym and about three other rooms filled with ski/snowboard gear. Get there early for the best selections.


P.S.: Your friend must know how to ski quite well. Tell him you'll pick up his lift ticket if he spends the day teaching you. Trust me in one day of someone actually spending quality time with you you'll be light years ahead of a couple lessons at an hour time. But first do the Granite Peak program and learn the basics. Then take your friend out with you and he should beable to give you lots of pointers. Took me about two times out to teach my 5 year old. By the end of the year he was doing tree runs and going off 12 to 15 Ft long boxes in the terrain park. I took him out one morning and let him get the feel of it and then he had a private lesson in the afternoon. Next time out worked with him for the day. After that he was skiing just fine for a 5 year old and everytime out he got better and better. Did the same with my daughter though now she is on a snowboard.
post #39 of 59
Cassina, you really need to read what you type before you post it.

" ............ buying the best boots you can afford is a waste of money ............. if I had bought expert or intermediate boots as first boots they would have been too big ..... "

No, if you bought up the food chain a notch they might have been too stiff perhaps. However a good fitter can remove some plastic and soften the flex. If you bought boots "too big" .... well, you bought boots that were too big.

Quit confusing this guy.
post #40 of 59
Though, to be fair, early on it's hard to understand whether a boot is store-comfortable because it fits or if it's just too big.

Yes, I know, bootfitter, bootfitter. But: a) this guy lives in Wisconsin, where for all I know (and anyone who reads my posts regularly knows I don't know anything), there are no good bootfitters; and b) even with a guru of a fitter, if you haven't skied much (or at all), it's hard to understand what fits well and what's just comfortable 'cause it's big.
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassina View Post
I have been skiing for 17 years so consider myself reasonabily
confident with my ability to set my bindings.
That is fine for yourself. But, not to advise a new skier to do. And, keep in mind that many of the posters here have been skiing for 30, 40, 50 even 60 years. I've been skiing for almost 30 and still confirm what I'm doing with people I consider more knowledgeable than me.

SubaruDude I disagree with the idea of Skylolow to pay your friend to give you a lesson. Trust me on this from a former racer and current coach perspective. It is VERY hard to communicate how to do things on skis when you've done them all your life and don't remember what it felt like to not know how to do it. As a coach I've gone through a lot of instruction to learn how to do it and an instructor with a ski school will have gone through far more. Spend that cash on a professional lesson, it will be far better spent. Once you have a few lessons/days under your belt then you'll be better able to relate to advice from your friend.
post #42 of 59
SubaruDude,

You've gotten great advice here. Boots are by far the most important part of the equation as far as equipment goes, and getting lessons from a good instructor will make your ski experience that much more fun.

I highly encourage you to take lessons with your dad as it can be an experience of a lifetime for both of you. My son (he's 16) and I go skiing about 50 days a year together. When we're on the mountain the difference in age goes away and we have fun like you wouldn't believe.

Good luck.

Mike
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
My advice:[*]Try to get out of taking lessons from your dad. This might not be easy, but you really want to take lessons from someone who knows how to ski on the modern gear with solid modern technique. I seriously doubt your dad falls in this category. (He probably falls is another category - [rimshot] - thank's I'll be here all week...)[/list]
Not appropriate to take shots at this guy's dad. You know zilch. But agree about lessons for another reason, though: Good way to have major tension is to try to teach a relative/good friend anything. Skiing, driving, bowling, you name it.
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassina View Post
2 of my skis have Look bindings. 1 pair is Pivot Jib which is a
turntable heel and the other is FX12. When I am skiing and falling I am unable to tell the difference between Marker and
Look. I tend to ski on long 177cm to 205 cm skis and when I fall
I fall on the tail 99% of the time. I have between 0 and 3 falls
per skiing day and rarely have binding release falls but have had
no knee twist whether the bindings have released or not. Skiing on Mid Fat skis prevents knee twist falls on soft heavy snow days for me.
Admire your tenacity, glad you Kiwis are self-reliant, don't want to gang up here. In fact, when I was a kid, I used to set my own bindings too. But look:

First, DIN adjustment scales on most recreational bindings are fairly inexact, generally just a piece of inscribed plastic over a plastic pointer that moves by some levers made of molded plastic or thin pressed metal. Both wear and loosen as the ski vibrates. In fact, haven't seen any really reliable indicators since the really old metal screw Look heels and they had other issues. The point of a shop is that the release pressure is applied externally and measured directly.

So glad you're confident, but IMO your track record is more about luck and margin of error for a setting than actually knowing what DIN you ski at. If you fall on your tails "99% of the time," I'm also mildly surprised you still have ACL's...

More to the point, there is NO justification for recommending specific DINS to someone else independently of weight, sex, and age. If a shop did that, they'd be flooded out by all the drool from the lawyers closing in.

Second, cannot see any justification for the idea that mid-fat skis are "safest." Do you mean most popular? Cannot relate to loads on the leg while edging, since by that measure the narrowest ski has the lowest loads. Ditto for quickness in maneuvering to avoid something. And a wider ski will be more stable and forgiving to skiders. It may relate to statistics, since odds are people who ski very narrow or very fat skis are apt to do more hazardous skiing (racing and off-piste), but that's not an intrinsic attribute of the ski. Welcome some elaboration.

Third, nobody here is arguing for "buying the best boots you can." (What does that mean, anyway? Racing plugs?) Nor is it clear to me what you mean by "...intermediate or expert boots...too big" if a bootfitter is involved. Their job is to insure a good fit. Yes, any boot packs out some in a season, but again a good bootfitter will make certain a boot fits the individual foot to begin with, so the change will not be so dramatic. Then you can just replace the liners if you really like the boot.

If he ends up racing, he'll almost certainly need a different boot with different liners. He would not want to wear this boot for rec skiing. So no need to discard the initial rec boot for a good while, anyway. More to the point, in the opinion of most here, an ill-fitting boot on a beginner is a recipe for a slow learning experience at best, injury or discomfort at worst. Again, realize you have a different experience, but it doesn't seem very typical.

Oh, and surprised you can't tell the diff between a Marker and a Look at release. About as different feeling to me as I've ever encountered. But maybe that's just me and my knees...
post #45 of 59
www.galacticsnowsports.com

They have a return policy for boot sizing etc. They sell older demo skis, rental skis etc for really cheap...They match up bindings to boots etc. I would buy from a reputible website like this before craigs list. Check it out.

I mean they are a good place to buy something to last you a couple of years at least.
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post
SubaruDude I disagree with the idea of Skylolow to pay your friend to give you a lesson. Trust me on this from a former racer and current coach perspective. It is VERY hard to communicate how to do things on skis when you've done them all your life and don't remember what it felt like to not know how to do it. As a coach I've gone through a lot of instruction to learn how to do it and an instructor with a ski school will have gone through far more. Spend that cash on a professional lesson, it will be far better spent. Once you have a few lessons/days under your belt then you'll be better able to relate to advice from your friend.
I guess I should've clarified it a little better. He should take the lessons first and then have his friend ski with him and give him pointers. I always hate teaching from the start and agree with you its a pain to explain how to do it the right way. I've found if they gone through one lesson and learn the basics and can at least snow plow, begin to turn, and stop. At that point a good friend can take a few hours with them on the hill and really help them take that next step very quickly. Versus having a lesson and then saying go work on it. But usually those people struggle all day on the most basics of basic skills. A good friend at that point can give you alot of pointers and keep your spirit up. Many times on the hill I'll actually stop and help a begginer out if I see them struggling(no one is around to help them usually) and I'll ski the one run with them and give them some pointers. Quite a few times later in the day that person will see me and come over and thank me.


P.S.: I didn't really mean pay his friend. Its just nice thing do when someone is spending the day helping you learning. Not to fun for his friend to pay $40 for lift ticket and poke around on the hill for a day with you learning.
post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Not appropriate to take shots at this guy's dad. You know zilch.
I know that the original poster is in High School and he just found out that his father skis. Or used to. That tells me that Dad hasn't been on skis for at least a decade, from which I can infer that Dad is unfamiliar with modern equipment and modern technique.

Dad may have been a master of the Stein's Mambo in his youth, but that won't make him a good teacher today.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
But agree about lessons for another reason, though: Good way to have major tension is to try to teach a relative/good friend anything. Skiing, driving, bowling, you name it.
Yep. That too.
post #48 of 59
OK, regarding DIN, right up front and the freakin' reality.

Race ... schmace ... why racers have to set their own DIN ... the shops are not going to do it, at least from my experience.

There are three boxes that Y-O-U check .. to .. rate yourself and then provide your age and weight.

To date, I have never seen .... after over 40+ years on skis .. with a box number 4 ... that says extreme and talented high level racer or master of all on the mountain.

Ok .. so you paid the big $$ for a race binding that has a DIN of 20 ..... are they gonna set them at 20 .... hell no ... you get them handed back per the chart and if the chart is 12 ... that's what you walk out with. Now the racer has to crack them up a few notches because they are coming out of them. At that point ... you are on your own .. cause, the one thing patrol does is to record the DIN if you have an incident.

Only a fool does their own DIN especially intermedite fools who spread this kind of blather for bragging rights.
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
To date, I have never seen .... after over 40+ years on skis .. with a box number 4 ...
Every form I've filled out has III + as an option; if you choose that your bindings get set to one point above where they would be if you had chosen type III. So that's an awful lot like "4".

I agree that most people shouldn't service their own bindings. There's more to it than just setting the DIN value, and if you don't understand the "more" part you shouldn't mess with them.

That said, once they've been inspected, lubricated, set to the proper pre-load and toe-height (if applicable), set to the appropriate DIN and tested to make sure they release at the correct torque then I don't see a problem with a racer cranking them up a point or two.

For rec skiers, especially those who are prematurely releasing due to sloppy technique, leave them suckers alone.
post #50 of 59
Our forms do not have a III+ or a 4 on them. Nor do I ever recall seeing one.
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by skylolow View Post

P.S.: I didn't really mean pay his friend. Its just nice thing do when someone is spending the day helping you learning. Not to fun for his friend to pay $40 for lift ticket and poke around on the hill for a day with you learning.
Cool, we're on the same page. Well, except if friend is a racer then I'm guessing he has a season pass.
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Our forms do not have a III+ or a 4 on them. Nor do I ever recall seeing one.
The one I filled out this weekend when I had my knew skis mounted had a III+.
post #53 of 59
Walt, to spell it out, this is not about whether Dad does or doesn't know how to ski well, or whether you know he does or doesn't. We both agree that relatives don't teach.

This is about not taking clever shots at someone's Dad, period. Regardless of why, or what context, or how justified. Just bad form. The kind of thing that you wouldn't do in person to a stranger unless you were looking for a fight. Clear enough now?

III+ - Have not seen this, but haven't been inside a rental shop in a season.
post #54 of 59
Dude, welcome to my world... Of skiing. Definitely try the boots on before you get 'em, nothing is worse than boots that don't fit. Rent for the season, it's always nice to get to swap in your skis the next year. That way, once you get better at skiing on a beginner level, you can buy more advanced gear. I'm also new to these forums, but skiing is my life, not a doubt in my mind.
~Skierboy
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassina View Post
Binding setting will be another issue as you will
need to crank them up as you get better.
Thats why you get DIN 15-30 binders! :P.

Note to the OP: Do not get DIN 15-30 bindings, they will eat you. literally. and they suck to step into.
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Cassina, you really need to read what you type before you post it.

" ............ buying the best boots you can afford is a waste of money ............. if I had bought expert or intermediate boots as first boots they would have been too big ..... "

No, if you bought up the food chain a notch they might have been too stiff perhaps. However a good fitter can remove some plastic and soften the flex. If you bought boots "too big" .... well, you bought boots that were too big.

Quit confusing this guy.
But surely you can understand that a beginner does not know
how good they are going to get so why spend more money than
you need to start off with. For a lot of people today time as well as money is a problem so if someone only has time to ski 2 or 3 days a year they are unlikely to benefit from more expensive boots than beginner boots. I have also read that when shopping for boots try and choose a pair that do not need softening or
stretching etc to fit as the plastic may be weakened. When I
considered getting this done to some boots that felt a little tight width wise after 2 seasons use I was told that if the boot
is stretched and it cracks the shop would not be liable which does cofirm that certain boot mods are at the expense of weakening the boot.
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Walt, to spell it out, this is not about whether Dad does or doesn't know how to ski well, or whether you know he does or doesn't. We both agree that relatives don't teach.
This is about not taking clever shots at someone's Dad, period. Regardless of why, or what context, or how justified. Just bad form. The kind of thing that you wouldn't do in person to a stranger unless you were looking for a fight. Clear enough now?
I'm very very sorry I offended you. It's rude to make jokes in the presence of those with no sense of humor. I should have known better. I didn't realize that humor-impaired Americans were reading this thread and will try to be more sensitive to their sensibilities in the future.
post #58 of 59
SubaruDude:
Welcome to Epic it is a great place to get great info. It is also a great place to get the worst info possible. Cassina case in point.

You have already gotten really good advice from some of the most experienced people on this site. Ignore all the buy Looks dude and set them yourself dude and other assorted drivel.

Stop reading here, let the thread expire. Follow advice from trekchik, yuki and a few others and go ski. Check back in after your first few times and let us know how things are working and what you are thinking. For the moment you already have the best advice possible.

Cassina, I too have a technical background. Without stating it I'll bet I have had the time to go somewhat beyond what you have. I've also been skiing for about 40 years, have been in and out of the industry for 30 years and am a boot guy here on Epic.

I have no idea without the charts of how to calculate my DIN based on my height, weight, length of boot sole (lever arm for your technical background) skier classification and age how to calculate my DIN and yet you seem to be able to do it without any of the necessary specs and you seem to have arrived at the fact that good skiers should be at around 8 and not so good should be set lighter.

I wonder why they make bindings that go to 14 for recreational skiers? Could it be that the length of the boot sole is a major factor in determining setting?
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Admire your tenacity, glad you Kiwis are self-reliant, don't want to gang up here. In fact, when I was a kid, I used to set my own bindings too. But look:

First, DIN adjustment scales on most recreational bindings are fairly inexact, generally just a piece of inscribed plastic over a plastic pointer that moves by some levers made of molded plastic or thin pressed metal. Both wear and loosen as the ski vibrates. In fact, haven't seen any really reliable indicators since the really old metal screw Look heels and they had other issues. The point of a shop is that the release pressure is applied externally and measured directly.

So glad you're confident, but IMO your track record is more about luck and margin of error for a setting than actually knowing what DIN you ski at. If you fall on your tails "99% of the time," I'm also mildly surprised you still have ACL's...

More to the point, there is NO justification for recommending specific DINS to someone else independently of weight, sex, and age. If a shop did that, they'd be flooded out by all the drool from the lawyers closing in.

Second, cannot see any justification for the idea that mid-fat skis are "safest." Do you mean most popular? Cannot relate to loads on the leg while edging, since by that measure the narrowest ski has the lowest loads. Ditto for quickness in maneuvering to avoid something. And a wider ski will be more stable and forgiving to skiders. It may relate to statistics, since odds are people who ski very narrow or very fat skis are apt to do more hazardous skiing (racing and off-piste), but that's not an intrinsic attribute of the ski. Welcome some elaboration.

Third, nobody here is arguing for "buying the best boots you can." (What does that mean, anyway? Racing plugs?) Nor is it clear to me what you mean by "...intermediate or expert boots...too big" if a bootfitter is involved. Their job is to insure a good fit. Yes, any boot packs out some in a season, but again a good bootfitter will make certain a boot fits the individual foot to begin with, so the change will not be so dramatic. Then you can just replace the liners if you really like the boot.

If he ends up racing, he'll almost certainly need a different boot with different liners. He would not want to wear this boot for rec skiing. So no need to discard the initial rec boot for a good while, anyway. More to the point, in the opinion of most here, an ill-fitting boot on a beginner is a recipe for a slow learning experience at best, injury or discomfort at worst. Again, realize you have a different experience, but it doesn't seem very typical.

Oh, and surprised you can't tell the diff between a Marker and a Look at release. About as different feeling to me as I've ever encountered. But maybe that's just me and my knees...
I learnt to ski at 33 so with the benefit of maturity I took a calculated risk with the setting of my bindings. While I have
no industry experience I looked at my bindings from the perspective of being torque wrenches ie if you set your torque
wrench too high when you tighten a bolt you will strip the thread in the same way if your binding is too tight you will do
damage to your knees. For everyone that says the shop knows best with regard to settings how can they possibly know
best when it is from the advise you have given them based on your gut feeling of whether or not you have transitioned between beginner to intermediate or intermediate to advanced/expert, the correct point of safely justifying bindings being cranked a notch?
About the Midfats being the safest all I mean is in terms of fewer off piste falls and while most of my off piste falls were
non injury before, fewer off piste and on piste falls translate to
safer skiing in my book and as I said I have had no soft heavy
snow, ski tip twisting falls since getting my Mid Fats perhaps because the tip is too wide to sink unlike my narrow 68mm under
foot race skis. I would have to agree that the scale on bindings
is not absolutly precise and I don't think it has to be as where I live if you rent or demo skis the shop person does not use any external measuring devise when setting bindings.
I would have to agree that a poor fitting boot makes a dangerous slow learning curve and I was lucky when I progressed to longer skis the boot fit problem showed up as
instantly as it did and I must say I did not expect I would ditching the boots as soon as I did but as I said I was not to know how good I was going to get and I certainly did not think
I would end up buying GS race skis because I was having too many falls on my quick turning intermediate skis. While many on this site have been critical of my gear selection and set up methods I am skiing at a level and on gear that I would have to say is beyond my wildest dreams when I started out as a beginner. A good book I have read on gear selection and learning to ski is The Great North American Ski Book by I William Berry.
I don't think it is in print anymore and it was written in the days
of straight skis before I took up skiing in 1991/2
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