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When good gear goes discount - Page 3

post #61 of 81
As a side note. I'm going to try and convince the place where I got my daughters boots, into taking the plundge into "legitimate" boot fitting. They are good people that (IMO) lack in depth knowledge on alignment and balance. I had to explain to them what a Campbell Balance Machine is and they don't have anything to check alignment.

If they do this and purchase some more equipment, they could corner the market in this area. Currently, As far as I could tell, they are only capable of making your boots comfortable and have no way of checking balance or alignment. This is a fairly densely populated area on the border of MA that likes to shop in tax free NH. They wouldn't even have to be great; just good.
post #62 of 81
This industry continues to shoot itself in both feet. Last Feb. I bought a NEW high end, highly rated, ladies ski with integrated bindings from the previous season from a mainstream general merchandise liquidator for $170 delivered. They had several popular sizes and the same ski sold for $600 - $800 a year earlier with bindings. It was the equivalent to buying last years car for 1/3rd or 1/4th of the original price. It's an unbelievable level of depreciation.
Ski companies must be some of the worst marketers in the history of the world.
post #63 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
As a side note. I'm going to try and convince the place where I got my daughters boots, into taking the plundge into "legitimate" boot fitting. They are good people that (IMO) lack in depth knowledge on alignment and balance. I had to explain to them what a Campbell Balance Machine is and they don't have anything to check alignment.

If they do this and purchase some more equipment, they could corner the market in this area. Currently, As far as I could tell, they are only capable of making your boots comfortable and have no way of checking balance or alignment. This is a fairly densely populated area on the border of MA that likes to shop in tax free NH. They wouldn't even have to be great; just good.
"Masterfit University" tell them to check into it in their area or check the website.
post #64 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
People shouldn't get upset when someone shows up with gear that needs service they didn't sell.
And people shouldn't get upset at the prices they'll pay for that service. People that bought at the shop I work at will get a much better price (or comped) on service work than people that bought elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
BTW. Fortunately for me, my boots fit great right out of the box and I only need to have them molded. I can only imagine how much better they will fit then.
Again, free molding and a good-deal price on bootfitting if you buy the boots where I work. If you bring 'em in after purchasing elsewhere, not so much.

And I think we can all see why internet purchasers are on the hind one when it comes to warranty issues.

One way or another, the consumer will end up paying something more for their 'discounts'...and the guy that tried on a coat and bought online - How are you going to try stuff on in stores if they have to go out of business?
post #65 of 81
Thread Starter 
Ugh, double Ugh!
I really hate going to TJMaxx!
I went yesterday with a couple of teen age girls, who were being "teen age girls". Much to my dismay, I found the most adorable marmot soft shell. It followed me home.
See, I'm a believer in local shops, and I'm a believer in supporting the small business', but the discount was like a big fat carrot and the jacket looks sweeeet on me.
post #66 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Ugh, double Ugh!
I really hate going to TJMaxx!
I went yesterday with a couple of teen age girls, who were being "teen age girls". Much to my dismay, I found the most adorable marmot soft shell. It followed me home.
See, I'm a believer in local shops, and I'm a believer in supporting the small business', but the discount was like a big fat carrot and the jacket looks sweeeet on me.
The jacket looked like a big fat carrot on you? Was it this jacket? BEcause I don't recall seeing it in the Marmot catalog.



Just because it has a "Marmot" label on it, doesn't mean it is a real Marmot, it could have been a knockoff.
post #67 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
The jacket looked like a big fat carrot on you? Was it this jacket? BEcause I don't recall seeing it in the Marmot catalog.



Just because it has a "Marmot" label on it, doesn't mean it is a real Marmot, it could have been a knockoff.
Kinda like that but with my hot moves, it looks more like this!
post #68 of 81
I couldn't afford to buy skis at my local shop. I don't foresee ever being able too. The owner is still willing to discus skis with me, helmets, overpriced underwear, and everything else. When I found a pair of Vollants in a left-over bin for 99.99 and got bindings over the internet he mounted them for about 45 bucks.

When my kid needed new boots, guess where I bought them (hint: it's not the internet). When my daughter needed a waterproof winter coat, guess where I bought it.

Shops that charge for their service are fine. I bought my boots for hundreds more than I could have paid on line. I brought them back to be fitted about 5 times.

Shops that charge too much for skis and also OVERCHARGE for their service, as I've read about here, like charging 70 bucks to mount bindings, especially when the bindings are going onto a plate or system bindings are shooting themselves in the foot.
post #69 of 81
The shops could really help themselves if they would take care of the instructors and work on those relationships instead of being po'ed they they can get stuff on pro form. I sent many students and friends to the local shops to buy stuff, sometimes walking in with them but never got even a thank you afterwards or the next time I was in. As an instructor I got 10-20% off depending on what I was buying and where but it was still more expensive than online. So why should I feel obligated to them? I know there are exceptions and some shops really take care of the instructors that send them business but it doesn't seem to be the norm.
post #70 of 81
Just stopped by Marshall's and found this Marker insulated parka $169. Goes nice with the the new helmet, which I did buy from my favorite ski shop. I got the Mountainsmith backpack from Dick's I had $20.00 gift card from there.

When it comes to skis and boots I buy from shops in VT.




MattL
Like you said, some of the shops understand that and some don't. In this business word of mouth goes a long way. As an Ambassador I get asked to recommend where a guest should buy things. My answer normally depends on how I was treated the last time I was in one of the shops.
post #71 of 81
Max,

How are we supposed to find you in the lift line w/o your yellow helmet? A titanium G10? there will be a hunnerd of them at Okemo on any given day .

MattL, I agree with you, some shops are real short sited, there is an old saying..."Don't $hit where you eat"
post #72 of 81
IDK



post #73 of 81
Other side of the coin here.

Most (not all) instructors and pros come into a shop looking for the screamin pro deal and free tunes, etc. while telling the shop owner all the great things and business they will send them.

Instead of this tact, the pros may want to put their money where their mouth is by beginning a win/win relationship with sending in referrals and escorting clients into the shop personally and demonstrating their value to the shop FIRST, then watch how the shop owners treat you!! It is easy to make promises, get what you want, and never keep a single promise! Kinda like politicians.

Become an asset to the shop rather than a liability and you will reap the rewards of a reciprocal relationship.

There are a handful of pros that I don't charge for any services and in fact allow to come in and use my shop and tools to do their own work. This is because they come by and lend a hand when they see we are busy and will jump in and help customers without being asked, they willfully tout our services and expertise to other customers in the store and on the hill sending countless referrals who buy equipment on their suggestions. These are true professionals who get it and I feel fortunate to have their support and happily help them get the best prices and services I can offer!
post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Other side of the coin here.

Most (not all) instructors and pros come into a shop looking for the screamin pro deal and free tunes, etc. while telling the shop owner all the great things and business they will send them.

Instead of this tact, the pros may want to put their money where their mouth is by beginning a win/win relationship with sending in referrals and escorting clients into the shop personally and demonstrating their value to the shop FIRST, then watch how the shop owners treat you!! It is easy to make promises, get what you want, and never keep a single promise! Kinda like politicians.

Become an asset to the shop rather than a liability and you will reap the rewards of a reciprocal relationship.

There are a handful of pros that I don't charge for any services and in fact allow to come in and use my shop and tools to do their own work. This is because they come by and lend a hand when they see we are busy and will jump in and help customers without being asked, they willfully tout our services and expertise to other customers in the store and on the hill sending countless referrals who buy equipment on their suggestions. These are true professionals who get it and I feel fortunate to have their support and happily help them get the best prices and services I can offer!

Wow, I can't believe you let them use the tools. Don't let your insurance find out that.

Don't get me wrong, I think that is great. I will help to talk to customers when I'm in the shop and the sales staff is busy. I think most of us ask the guest to use our name when they deal with the shop we recommend. I have also walked in with customers.
post #75 of 81
Thread Starter 
Bud that is sort of how it is(or used to be) at the KP shop at Crystal. I sent a lot of people into their shop. I took a lot of people in their shop, and often helped the person with gear knowledge. I guess you could say, I was their shop pimp. When I needed boot fitting, ski mounting or anything else done, they did back flips to help me out at a bargain. (I won't define bargain)

KP was a shop run by a private individual at the mountain, but Crystal corporate is taking the space this year but offering the employees their old jobs. I'm not sure how that is going to work out, or what kind of product they'll have.
post #76 of 81
Thanks for the reminder. I too have had lots of free stuff done out of my favorite shop, as well as first class treatment.

Years ago on a Saturday night, I walked in behind a large crowd of people just as the best Tuning Tech yell's out, "that's it on more skis tonight" Scotty see's me and say's Byron what do you need and when? He say's come back in one hour, they'll be done.

It pay's to give good tips too, Scotty liked pizza.


Like most of us old timers say, you need to develope a relationship with a good shop.
post #77 of 81
It's funny how our culture has changed just in my lifetime? It's also sad....
post #78 of 81
This topic comes up alot. Epic is a huge online watering hole for ski shops and ski pros. Given the amount of play this issue gets my take is that the ski companies have really done a "great job" of undermining their B&M retail stores with these online liquidations. It seems ski companies may have have forgotten that to a large extent it is the retailer on the ground who creates the local market. And that retialer does add vlaue to the ski company simply by making the product available, and offering services (such as a demo program), and that value is created reguardless of where the sale is eventually conducted (from online).
post #79 of 81
Perhaps one day the manufacturers will pay the retailers, that are left, to stock their products and provide demos and service, just to support the company's online direct sales machine?
post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Perhaps one day the manufacturers will pay the retailers, that are left, to stock their products and provide demos and service, just to support the company's online direct sales machine?
I don't know a ton about how the ski industry works beyond what i read on epic. But to me it seems that ski companies and local shops need each other. I am guessing that eventually a smart ski company will find a way to give shops a better deal and keep the local shops in the game. And that ski company will get a big boost as a result.
post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
I don't know a ton about how the ski industry works beyond what i read on epic. But to me it seems that ski companies and local shops need each other. I am guessing that eventually a smart ski company will find a way to give shops a better deal and keep the local shops in the game. And that ski company will get a big boost as a result.
Easiest way would be kick backs to the true brick and mortar retailers. Similar to how car companys do it. Also put tighter control on the output production.

Going back to cars, GM just builds cars one after the other. There usually isn't a set amount for each year(when there is its usually beyond what they would ever sell for that year). Toyota for example builds "x" amount each year and that is it. Which is why usually you can go on a mega GM dealership lot and buy last year model cars six months plus after the new 09 models have been released (some cases well over a year).

Seems to me in the ski/snowboard industry there is alot of left over stock from year to year. Which doesn't bode well when many new models are just graphic changes from one year to the next. So your not really getting a better product in a lot of cases by buying the 09 model.
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