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How fast does a bike go?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
The parking fee at the train station is going up and I'm thinking of maybe riding my bike to the train if I can fit it in to my schedule. Used to MTB but never road biked. So I fast can I expect to ride if--

late 40s rider
Reasonably fit but have always been somewhat aerobically challenged.
Mid 90s mountain bike, but I can put slicks on it.
Suburban back roads. Mostly flat with a few small hills.
3.3 miles each way.

Would 10 MPH be reasonable to expect? 12MPH?
post #2 of 23
If you put slicks on it 15 mph schould be a good sustained average speed.

A good road bike will give you 5 more mph.

Michael
post #3 of 23
I'd say 10. You would probably gain 2 mph per week as your fitness improves. Probably top out around 18-22. Then theres the wind...
post #4 of 23
When I was bike commuting I had a computer that did average speed. Somewhere around 15mph was pretty easy without working too hard. It didn't count when you were stopped.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
The parking fee at the train station is going up and I'm thinking of maybe riding my bike to the train if I can fit it in to my schedule. Used to MTB but never road biked. So I fast can I expect to ride if--

late 40s rider
Reasonably fit but have always been somewhat aerobically challenged.
Mid 90s mountain bike, but I can put slicks on it.
Suburban back roads. Mostly flat with a few small hills.
3.3 miles each way.

Would 10 MPH be reasonable to expect? 12MPH?
10mph is pretty easy on nearly anything. For sure put slick on it though that would be the biggest improvement with smallest cost.

assuming a rider height of 6 feet tall, 180lb rider, 30lb of bike, flat road, you have to produce roughly 50 watts of power for alittle less than 20 minutes. trust me when i say this 50 watts of power is nothing.
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
I'd say 10. You would probably gain 2 mph per week as your fitness improves. Probably top out around 18-22. Then theres the wind...
18-22mph? I live in the same area as learn2turn does; there is a decent-size cycling population around here. Not a whole lot can average that type of speed over our terrain. How much fitness would you expect somebody to pick up riding 3.3 miles twice a day? That's not enough time to get properly warmed up, let alone do any speed work, etc.

I think 14, 15mph on an MTB w/ slicks would be attainable after a few weeks as a "casual, ride to work" type pace.
post #7 of 23
Sure, you can do that distance with knobbies in 20min no problem. With slicks, 15min.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanx for the responses.

Bushwack, did you peak at my last checkup? I'm 6' 182lb. Bike and crap will probably weigh in at 30lbs.

If I can do 10MPH it is 20 min. I have to add five min for stop signs and such, and five minutes safety time to get the bike locked and jump on the train. If I give myself 1/2 hour, I might just be able to do it. I'm thinking in mid-winter when it's 2F in the AM, that might be too much but I'm willing to give it a go in fall, at least to get in shape for ski season, (and to the screw the MBTA for double parking fees for a small percentage of riders instead of having a small fare increase for all riders.)

The slicks go on this weekend and I'll do a practice ride Sunday.
post #9 of 23
Click on the link below.

This free software provides an analysis of speed & power. It's also good for evaluating changes in your bike, tires & riding position.

The better recreational cyclists can produce 400watts at peak and can maintain 300 watts for extended periods.

Check it out: http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/espeed.htm
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Click on the link below.

This free software provides an analysis of speed & power. It's also good for evaluating changes in your bike, tires & riding position.

The better recreational cyclists can produce 400watts at peak and can maintain 300 watts for extended periods.

Check it out: http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/espeed.htm
I dont think that thing is very accurate......even though that is what I used for learn to turn. I threw in the average speed from my last road ride. A 27 mile not even close to flat ride. and it threw me back 723 watts. there is no way I can do that for that long so I am saying your results may vary on that calculator.
post #11 of 23
Flat pedals and street shoes? Expect 12-14 mph if you use tallish gearing.

If you're pushing 46x13, that might have some fitness effect over nothing at all; but I would do it just to eff them out of parking fees, and make sure to do some additional hamstring work on the side.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I dont think that thing is very accurate......even though that is what I used for learn to turn. I threw in the average speed from my last road ride. A 27 mile not even close to flat ride. and it threw me back 723 watts. there is no way I can do that for that long so I am saying your results may vary on that calculator.
I only use it to compare outcomes. I entered the data for my old bike and my new bike. The speed at 225 watts on each bike was close to my recorded speed on a 15 mile loop that I ride often. The speed difference of 5 mph between my hybrid and CX bike also checked out.

According to the model, would need a recumbent or time-trial bike to get any large improvements over my CX bike.

Michael
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
18-22mph? I live in the same area as learn2turn does; there is a decent-size cycling population around here. Not a whole lot can average that type of speed over our terrain. How much fitness would you expect somebody to pick up riding 3.3 miles twice a day? That's not enough time to get properly warmed up, let alone do any speed work, etc.

I think 14, 15mph on an MTB w/ slicks would be attainable after a few weeks as a "casual, ride to work" type pace.

I would expect fitness to pick up considerably if the rider pushed hard the whole way. I would not expect this rider to do that alot since its a commute.

14, 15 sounds good to me.
post #14 of 23
i used to commute on an old cannodale road bike with 120 psi tires and it was easy to average 20 mph. my ride was pretty much flat the whole way though. i also averaged about 1 flat tire a week. also about 1 angry motorist confrontation and/or assault and a couple of big scary dog chases per month. the dogs tended to increase my average speed a bit.
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Click on the link below.

Check it out: http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/espeed.htm
Interesting, that give me about 10MPH at 50Watts. 12.2 MPH at 75W. 13.6MPH at 100W.

That's for an MTB with a wide slick and my body specs. I left incline at 0% as I think the net each way is about 0 even though there are some slight ups and downs.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I dont think that thing is very accurate......even though that is what I used for learn to turn. I threw in the average speed from my last road ride. A 27 mile not even close to flat ride. and it threw me back 723 watts. there is no way I can do that for that long so I am saying your results may vary on that calculator.
Dude, I guessed at your values and got 416 watts @ 27 mph. I assumed your data, on a road bike, on the drops with skinny slicks.
post #17 of 23

My 2 cents

Assuming you want to work when you get there and not shower, generally expect 12mph - that would be a good estimate. You can get a decent Trek wireless trip computer for less than $50.00 if you want to get particular. I use one and love it. If you want to play around with other ideas check out http://www.caloriesperhour.com/index_burn.php - but don't take the results as science...


Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
The parking fee at the train station is going up and I'm thinking of maybe riding my bike to the train if I can fit it in to my schedule. Used to MTB but never road biked. So I fast can I expect to ride if--

late 40s rider
Reasonably fit but have always been somewhat aerobically challenged.
Mid 90s mountain bike, but I can put slicks on it.
Suburban back roads. Mostly flat with a few small hills.
3.3 miles each way.

Would 10 MPH be reasonable to expect? 12MPH?
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
Dude, I guessed at your values and got 416 watts @ 27 mph. I assumed your data, on a road bike, on the drops with skinny slicks.
you forgot hills.....which i dont know how to do that I put in 4 percent even though most hills are alot more than around here and then average speed.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
you forgot hills.....which i dont know how to do that I put in 4 percent even though most hills are alot more than around here and then average speed.
Not to argue, but 27 mph @ a 4% grade is huge!

Michael
post #20 of 23
There is how long it takes you to get there, and how long it takes you to get there and not be totally sweaty. If you don't have a shower at work you need to figure out the second one, which may be significantly slower than the first one.
post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 
Well it's New England autumn so were looking at AMs in the 40s and 30s.

Realistically, I don't think I'd bike to the train on days that are hot, real cold, or inclement. I can get a car ride in the morning if I want and lock my bike to the car, then ride it home. Different hours in the PM prevent car-pooling back home.

So, maybe I'll ride home most days and ride in just when the weather is right.
post #22 of 23
Sounds like a plan. I use a combination of car, bus & bike almost every day. I aim to reduce car usage and increase miles ridden, but I'm not a purist.

MB
post #23 of 23

Think

Lights, fenders with mudflaps, and trouser leg tie-backs.
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