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What Makes a Great Instructor? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
you need to be able to instruct all genders
How many genders are there over there?
post #32 of 44
According to the dictionary there are three. Masculine, feminine and neuter.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
According to the dictionary there are three. Masculine, feminine and neuter.
You're also forgetting undetermined.
Some kids it's hard to tell when young and all bundled up what gender they are at first meeting.
post #34 of 44
I guess you also need degrees in child psychology, sports psychology, thermodynamics, instructional design, education, physical therapy... Oh, and don't forget you also need to be adept at water skiing...
post #35 of 44
So true. I had a kid once with a neutral name that looked like a girl, long hair, baby face. In a group. I referred to the kid as she more then once. Turned out it was a boy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
You're also forgetting undetermined.
Some kids it's hard to tell when young and all bundled up what gender they are at first meeting.
post #36 of 44
My favorite instructor last year was the one with the sense of humor. His humor put everyone in my group at ease -- we were having fun while learning.
post #37 of 44
From the marketing department...
A Great Instructor keeps the clients coming back. Many tactics mentioned in this thread are implemented by skilled, professional instructors to achieve that end.
Lots of great posts here... sweet!
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I guess you also need degrees in child psychology, sports psychology, thermodynamics, instructional design, education, physical therapy... Oh, and don't forget you also need to be adept at water skiing...
Couldn't hurt. I would think you at least need a basic understanding in all of these areas.

Especially waterskiing!

JF
post #39 of 44
I think it was Bill Russell who said that being a professional means doing something that you love to do, even on days where you don't feel like doing it.

Although I can't imagine feeling that way now (in October), I know that there are days in February on a Sunday afternoon at around 3:15 when I really just want to go home.

A Great ski instructor has the same amount of energy and enthusiasm every time he/she teaches.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
A professional is a person who can do his best at a time when he doesn't particularly feel like it.
Alistair Cooke
Bill Russell said, Durability is part of what makes a great athlete.
post #41 of 44
You know what? It was Dr. J.

Quote:
Being a professional is doing the things you love to do, on the days you don’t feel like doing them
post #42 of 44
I just had my very first private lesson yesterday and (after a rough first ski the week before) left the mountain grinning from ear to ear and eager for the next trip! I credit my instructor for making the experience so memorable. So what made him so great?

Small amounts of information at a time: He explained one discreet skill at a time, starting with the basics and working up from there. He also used metaphors to help me better understand what my body should be doing. He communicated clearly and repeated himself when necessary

Modeling: He showed me how to perform each skill before he asked me to do it.

Goals: He had me set my own goals at the beginning of the session, then gave me small, attainable goals for each run.

Skill: It is clear that he is a seasoned skier and that he loves the sport. He knew how to break a skill down in smaller increments and how to give constructive feedback.

Passion/Excitement: This was his best quality and the one that made me want to learn more. He celebrated every good run and every improvement. Often, I would look at him after a good run and he'd be smiling, cheering my name, and waving his arms around excitedly. He was truly happy to see me do well and his excitement was contagious. When he saw me on the mountain later in the day, he'd wave excitedly and compliment me or give me a few more pointers. It clearly wasn't about the paycheck for my instructor.

The bottom line is that I had a great day on the slopes after my lesson. I feel confident enough to try more challenging runs and have a clear idea of how to control my speed and direction, which is exactly what I need as a beginner. Whenever I was successful at a challenge (the first time I got off the lift without falling, the first time I made it all the way down the run without falling, etc.), I thought about my instructor and how proud he'd be. Now THAT is the sign of a great teacher!
post #43 of 44
I dislike the 'by the book' types. I always preferred the older instructors. They are generally well seasoned, easy-going, nice personality, and usually have no major ego issues which you often find with many younger instructors and Clinic leaders.

They are usually not devoted to one particular methodology, do not always go by the book and often find unique ways to get a point accross. They are there to share their love of skiing and it rubs off on you. Often, you get someone who acts like they are showing you things that they know that you don't, rather than sharing experience and skills with a fellow skier.
post #44 of 44
I agree that communication is the overarching skill in teaching anything. Both being able to figure out what is really asked for, and being able to clearly explain how to get there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfoot1598 View Post

It clearly wasn't about the paycheck for my instructor.
I guarantee this is true.

I love my office. I love to ski with great skiers and learn how they do things. I love working with people and getting the contact high from their breakthrough moments.

All in all I feel that once you get past that vow of poverty thing teaching skiing is the greatest job in the world.
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