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marker SpeedPoint DEMO Bindings

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
i just bought a used pair of skies with the marker m900 speedpoint demo bindings. i am unable to turn the dial to adjust the bindings to fit my boots. are there any tricks to get this dial to turn? if the dial will not turn are the bindings no good?

thank you for your time
post #2 of 17
Just behind the dial in the middle of the ski there is a metal lever/handle. Pull that out from the ski.
Turn dial.
Push in.
post #3 of 17
Be aware that Marker recalled a group of these bindings. If your binding has a black dot next to the "Dual direction technology" script, your binding was not subject to the recall.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

thanks

thanks for the instruction. that was easy. i won't tell you how long i spent on it before writing to you guys. can you give me an idea of what the din on the binding should be for a 110 lb girl with intermediate skills?

thanks for your time
post #5 of 17
with what (boot sole length in mm) boots?
post #6 of 17
DIN is calculated using:

Height
Weight
Age
Skier Type (this isn't skill level)

Type I- Ski slow on easier terrain, prefer easier release
Type III- Ski agressively, at higher speeds on difficult terrain,
favor retention over release.
Type II- anyone who doesn't fit ALL of criteria of I or III

Boot Sole Length- Millimeter length of boot, normally it can be
found imprinted on the shell. Look on the side of the heel.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by siggia View Post
thanks for the instruction. that was easy. i won't tell you how long i spent on it before writing to you guys. can you give me an idea of what the din on the binding should be for a 110 lb girl with intermediate skills?
You can use this DIN calculator to determine your DIN setting. It's not exactly rocket surgery.

The thing is, DIN don't mean squat unless the boot sole length and forward pressure is adjusted correctly. And then there is the issue of actually testing the bindings to ensure that they release at the right torque (not too soon, not too late). Do you know how to adjust forward pressure? Do you have a calibrated torque wrench apparatus to test the release characteristics?

If the answers to either of the last two questions are "no", then take the skis to a shop, spend the $20 and have it done professionally. Much cheaper and far less painful than a spiralled tibia.
post #8 of 17
What Walt said, plus if you take them to a shop, ask them to also dismount the bindings and renew the lubrication.
post #9 of 17
HELL- just crank em up until your sure they will not come off! How bad can a spiraled tibia hurt anyway?

Just kidding... all of the above is good. The number will only reflect the baseline release settings. Depending on the wear on your boot and how well the bindings are lubed will effect the actual number... to be safe... take them to a shop... b
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

thanks

thanks for the info. the calculator has quite a wide range (age 10 -49). i usually start on the cautious side and adjust them on the hill. it is just my kids stuff anyway, they are pliable. bones and ligaments don't start snapping until you get older.

thanks for your time
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by siggia View Post
it is just my kids stuff anyway, they are pliable. bones and ligaments don't start snapping until you get older.

thanks for your time
Really? I've never seen a kid in a cast before.



That is so very much the wrong way of looking at things. If you want to task the risk of adjusting your bindings, go for it. You (hopefully) understand the risks. Don't put your kids in a dangerous situation to save a few $$.

My dad used to screw with my bindings to save $20 each season. THANK GOD I never got hurt. I did however struggle constantly to stay in the bindings. Hell, I remember one time clocking in and watching the heelpiece slide off the track and into the snow.

Thanks dad.
post #12 of 17

Right, it's only kids gear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by siggia View Post
it is just my kids stuff anyway, they are pliable. bones and ligaments don't start snapping until you get older.
Well, why didn't you say it was just kids gear in the first place?

Everybody knows that children are indestructable so there's no reason to bother with any of that safety nonsense. Plus you can always breed more if this one gets damaged.

Although, honestly, I don't understand why you're bothering with ski gear in the first place. Just chain the little kneebiters to a stake in the backyard while you go skiing. They'll be there when you get back, and if not it's no big deal - it's not like humans are in danger of extinction or anything. Plenty more where that one came from.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

That is so very much the wrong way of looking at things. Don't put your kids in a dangerous situation to save a few $$.

My dad used to screw with my bindings to save $20 each season. THANK GOD I never got hurt.
I have seen so much well-intentioned hackery regarding dads unintentionally sandbagging their kids safety with do-it-at-home binding "adjustments." Go ahead dad, wax those skis... but step away from the bindings with your screwdriver!
post #14 of 17
I think the sarcasm was missed by several people. The Speedpoint does not come in "did" sizes does it? I suspect that you all missed the point there... although there is the pink elephant that remains in the room about adjusting on the hill. I have always raced, so I crank the bindings up and try to keep my feet up if I fall.... for the purpose of establishing a baseline DIN for your kids... I would take them to the shop and have them tested. Then if they keep pre releasing, you know its a boot issue, or maybe time for some less used gear.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
...ask them to also dismount the bindings and renew the lubrication.
Could you elaborate on this for me?
post #16 of 17


Thanks Walt for Din calculator. Good information for adjusting skis. I better check used gear indeed.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post


You can use this DIN calculator to determine your DIN setting. It's not exactly rocket surgery.

 


maybe this is a simpleton's question, but doesn't this DIN Calculator miss the variable of the actual binding?  I could have sworn that the DIN setting cheat-sheets I've got at home (printed from the Salomon and Tyrolia websites) had different scales on them.  IE, my settings would be different in each binding.

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