EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Beginner Zone › Transition to Downhill
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Transition to Downhill

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

New here. First let me say I've really enjoyed browsing these forums as everyone seems really friendly and helpful.

Anywho back on topic, after 5 or so years of cross country skiing only I've decided that I'd like to make the transition to downhill seeing as all I do is head straight for the rope tows and fly down the hills anyways. I'd say I'm pretty competent in my abilities to carve back and forth and navigate steep narrow shoots on the cross country skis.
So the questions I have are:
1. I've heard that if you are fine flying down hills on the CC skis then transitioning to downhill should be no problem?
2. The types of downhill skis are somewhat greek to me. I'm looking for a do it all sort of ski (if such a thing exists). A friend suggested I take a look at twin tip skis saying they would be the most versatile.

Any help on these areas would be greatly appreciated. Once again thanks for the wealth of info here.

-aaron
post #2 of 10
Have you considered nordic downhill? Fixed heel makes sense for racer or patrolman or freestyler progressing the sport in the park, but for recreational skiing, telemark skiing is far more rewarding than alpine (fixed heel) skiing, in my opinion. I don't think twin tip vs. directional ski will make any difference at this point. You will probably spend a winter or two going forward before you need a ski that enables skiing backwards.
post #3 of 10

versatile skis indeed

Quote:
Originally Posted by snapt View Post
1. I've heard that if you are fine flying down hills on the CC skis then transitioning to downhill should be no problem?
2. The types of downhill skis are somewhat greek to me. I'm looking for a do it all sort of ski (if such a thing exists). A friend suggested I take a look at twin tip skis saying they would be the most versatile.

-aaron
1. I don't know how fast you were going on your CC skis, but I've never heard of a CC skier going as fast as an alpine skier. But still...maybe you can.

2. I think your friend may have been joking about the versatility of twin-tips. Thinking you might not know which way is downhill?
post #4 of 10

New

Quote:
Originally Posted by snapt View Post
Hi all,

New here. First let me say I've really enjoyed browsing these forums as everyone seems really friendly and helpful.

Anywho back on topic, after 5 or so years of cross country skiing only I've decided that I'd like to make the transition to downhill seeing as all I do is head straight for the rope tows and fly down the hills anyways. I'd say I'm pretty competent in my abilities to carve back and forth and navigate steep narrow shoots on the cross country skis.
So the questions I have are:
1. I've heard that if you are fine flying down hills on the CC skis then transitioning to downhill should be no problem?
2. The types of downhill skis are somewhat greek to me. I'm looking for a do it all sort of ski (if such a thing exists). A friend suggested I take a look at twin tip skis saying they would be the most versatile.

Any help on these areas would be greatly appreciated. Once again thanks for the wealth of info here.

-aaron
Snapt, First Welcome to Epic! A really good site, enjoy. The transition from CC to Downhill. First, start off with rentals, easier to rent in chico and take up to tahoe with you, then you don't have to mess around when you get up there. Sign up for a lesson lst thing in AM. You will learn the basics and have a better day for it.

Go to Beginners Zone and read as many posts as you can, there's a lot of good info. there for gear etc.

Sugar Bowl has a good ski school. I took my lst lesson at Soda Springs. With your CC experience you will learn very fast, have fun. I am sure you will enjoy yourself. After you've rented the lst day or two, then you can buy. Boots first, then skis and poles.

Enjoy.
post #5 of 10
Oh, yeah, that's what I meant to say. Welcome, rent, take a lesson, check out the Beginner's Zone. I was a little too excited at a chance to recruit another telemarker. I'm sorry you didn't get a good answer like Pete's sooner. I hope you are still reading and decide to stick around.

I do believe with your background, you would take to it. If they have telemark rentals near you, give it a try!

Feel free to start threads about xc skiing. There are a lot of xc skiers here who would like to see more discussion of it at Epicski.
post #6 of 10
Some good advice from Pete there.

I found the most difficult thing about learning to ski was getting used to sliding and being on a slippy surface on slippy planks. With experience of sliding planks along snow, that's the awkward bit out of the way.

I'd add to Pete's comment about renting. Once you're happy and want to continue, I'd suggest picking up a pair of last season's skis, for half the price of this season's. With the exception of the top end models, there's little that changes in the beginner/intermediate ski ranges from year to year, the same ski with a different top sheet usually...
post #7 of 10
1--Expect a learning curve getting used to stiff boots.

2--Forget about twin tips at this point. You want to start with the usual very-forgiving rental skis, then likely graduate to some more-responsive/less-forgiving intermediate level skis. The length of these will probably come up to about your chin and hopefully have quite an hourglass shape...what we call a 12 meter or 13 meter turning radius. Do not start with equipment that is too advanced. That will slow your development. Twin tip skis are, as designed, great for tricks in the terrain (trauma) parks, especially for skiing backwards and 360° turns on the snow. They're surprisingly good all-around, but can be beat by the better regular skis except for tricks.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. I ended up getting set up already as the local shop had a sweet deal on some stuff that we talked over and deemed would best suit what I was looking to do. Didn't really want to wait as it wouldn't have lasted long at that price. I also wasn't huge on the idea of blowing lots of $ on rentals as I plan on spending a lot of time at it this winter and already had a good idea of what i wanted. What made it easier was the person helping me had made the same transition and was able to guide me by experience. I'm pretty confident that I'll have no problem picking it up.

And Telerod don't worry all is not lost...Next fall I have to take a Winter Mountaineering course for my major and a big component of the class involves telemark skiing.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by snapt View Post
And Telerod don't worry all is not lost...Next fall I have to take a Winter Mountaineering course for my major and a big component of the class involves telemark skiing.
That's pretty cool. What is your major? I never lost hope, snapt.

I didn't spend much time on rentals either. Waste of money. Same goes for demos.

Nordic downhill and alpine downhill are pretty much the same anyway. You can learn the basics on either type of gear.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Nordic downhill and alpine downhill are pretty much the same anyway. You can learn the basics on either type of gear.
That's exactly what I was looking for.

I'm sure I'll delve into telemark at some point. Right now, being young and stupid, I'm more interested in giving the trauma parks a shot.

I'm an outdoor education major.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Beginner Zone
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Beginner Zone › Transition to Downhill