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Gout

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm curious how many Bears have this form of arthritus and how they have dealt with it. I've had minor flare ups over the years but am now fighting the granddaddy of them all. Three trips to my family doctor and one referral to a specialist and my relief has only been temporary so far. At least time is on my side and I should be recovered by ski season.

Karl
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by orionxprss View Post
I'm curious how many Bears have this form of arthritus and how they have dealt with it. I've had minor flare ups over the years but am now fighting the granddaddy of them all. Three trips to my family doctor and one referral to a specialist and my relief has only been temporary so far. At least time is on my side and I should be recovered by ski season.

Karl
Do they call it pseudo gout? nasty stuff. Gold? I have heard that treatment works. Best of luck. I'd like to hear a follow up to see what was suggested.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Nope, not pseudo, this is the real thing. Diagnosed through blood test. Doc prescribed nsaids and steroids to reduce the swelling and inflammation but everything has been temorary so far. Maximum period of relief has been 48 hours. I've even tried tart cherry juice (natural remedy). I went to a specialist yesterday and hopefully this new course of treatment will clear it up.

Karl
post #4 of 15
What type of doctor do you see for gout?
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
I started with my family doctor who later refered me to an orthopedic specialist.

Karl
post #6 of 15
Dried Cherries or Cherry Juice. Celery also helps.

I have not had this condition, but my mother and a few friends have suffered from it.
My mom started drinking cherry juice every day which had amazing effects. Then I read that eating 6 dried cherries a day keeps foot pain away. She went to eating a handful of dried cherries every day(which are amazingly tasty) and her feet have been great every since.

PM me your address and I'll send you some, or you can get them at Sam's Club easy enough.
post #7 of 15
If it's gout, it's usually too much uric acid in your system. Also leads to development of kidney stones. A sampling of a 24-hour urine collection is the normal diagnostic tool. There are medications that can help. It's also helpful to consume lots of water.
post #8 of 15
I think it is Cholchicine that is the treatment of choice for acute gout. If I remember correctly, it is also antiinflammatory. I have heard gout is extremely painful. Some people swear by cherries, but there is only one cherry that actually works. And you have to consume large amounts of it everyday. I can't remember the name of the cherry.
post #9 of 15
It is Bing Cherries. You have to consume 45 of them a day and they have to be fresh, not frozen.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut_hucker View Post
It is Bing Cherries. You have to consume 45 of them a day and they have to be fresh, not frozen.
Believe it or not, Dried cherries do the trick too.
post #11 of 15
I'm a fellow gout sufferer. Nothing has been too bad, as the longest episode I've had is about 1 week. But that week was torture - I couldn't even let a sheet touch my right foot without causing excruciating pain. Not good at all when you have to wear shoes to work. Most (all?) of my episodes have corresponded with dehydration, so my first course of defense has been to drink lots of fluid - and not the fermented type, either. I'll have to remember the cherry trick - does that help after an attack? Although I'm pretty sure I can't handle 45 cherries each day.
post #12 of 15
Gout is a result of deposition of uric acid crystals within the joints. Certain dietary habits increase production of uric acid. You need to avoid: Alcohol, shell fish, red meat, organ meats and legumes.

The NSAIDS and steroids can help abort an acute attack as can colchicine. Colchicine can also be used preventively. If these measures are not effective a drug called allopurinol can reduce uric acid production in the blood. There are other drugs which can increase removal of uric acid through the kidneys and into the urine, but these may increase the risk of stone formation.

If your Doctor is not able to control your gout then see a Rheumatologist.

Hope this helps.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiDeC58 View Post
Gout is a result of deposition of uric acid crystals within the joints. Certain dietary habits increase production of uric acid. You need to avoid: Alcohol, shell fish, red meat, organ meats and legumes.
I could starve to death if I avoided all of this - this pretty much describes my diet.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by brabson View Post
I'm a fellow gout sufferer. Nothing has been too bad, as the longest episode I've had is about 1 week. But that week was torture - I couldn't even let a sheet touch my right foot without causing excruciating pain. Not good at all when you have to wear shoes to work. Most (all?) of my episodes have corresponded with dehydration, so my first course of defense has been to drink lots of fluid - and not the fermented type, either. I'll have to remember the cherry trick - does that help after an attack? Although I'm pretty sure I can't handle 45 cherries each day.
From a med page on the effects of cherries and gout:
Quote:
They reduce uric acid levels possibly because their anthocyanidins inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of uric acid. Thus the body makes less uric acid and there is less to expel.
PM me your address and I'll send you some dried cherries.
I make a trail mix with nuts and stuff. Tastes yummy and handy to snack on.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
PM me your address and I'll send you some dried cherries.
I make a trail mix with nuts and stuff. Tastes yummy and handy to snack on.
As always, TC, you are much too kind. PM sent.
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