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How can I understand it??

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hello!

This year I've had two far different experiences in ski.
Feb I was at Stubai, Austria and rent Fisher cool heat. The conditions were very good, powder, lots of new snow, not so groomed terrain.

Last month at Bariloche, Argentina I've rented Elan skis (cant remember the model). The conditions are almost the same - good snow, powder, less groomed.

My point is: I was not so confident with the Fisher, they had big vibrations and was hard to control.
In the other side, I felt far more confident with Elan, easy to control, more stable and something more solid.

That's make sense?

Keep in mind, I ski few days an year and should say my lvel is around 6 - Optimistically

Regards,
Eduardo
post #2 of 10
Could be the model of the ski. Some models are much more stable than others. This is the most likely case assuming sufficient skill of skier and similar conditions and use.

Could be the Fisher gave you too much ski feel and feedback (without actually being unstable to the point that it did not obey instructions precisely).

Could be the turn radius was longer on the Elan Model you tried and you prefer a longer turn radius.

Maybe you were going fast in Europe because you had better wax, wider trails .
post #3 of 10

Before we think about skis

Were the boots rentals too?
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Were the boots rentals too?

Yes whole set rented. And, boots, for sure, always difficult find a good pair of. First one in Europe, a large one in the front, allow me to move the foot inside it and extra efforts to control and make turns. Next day I' had changed for narrow one and lots of extra control!!
post #5 of 10
The Question by COMPREX was very important. The boots may have dictated your position on the ski which would determine the pressure on the inside edges of the ski. Meaning you were getting more inside edge too soon with the Fischers causing the ski to vibrate.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Good point!

I've never thought by this way before.

Yes, I can understand that I gave so poor information about the problem.

Let me try to explain it better:

First - I'm a 48 y.o. who start to ski from 2002 (yes, I'm absolutely addict for this amazing sport). Since that time I'm able to ski few 5 to 7 days/year. This Year was a little different since we can do it twice Stubai(Feb) and Bariloche(Sept).

But, several ski class later, I would like to say I'm able to down black ones and love the blue pistes. BTW, the color schema levels should be very ambiguous from one place to another.

The point is - how difficult is for us to chose a good rental skis+boots. Even tough, skiing so little time each year. Also about so many brands and models...

So, I came here to discuss with you guys what can I do in order to discover what kind of equipment (in general terms, of course) shoud be the best fo my next experiences!!

And would liketo say THANKS you all for share your expertises!!


Regards,
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by edlam View Post
So, I came here to discuss with you guys what can I do in order to discover what kind of equipment (in general terms, of course) shoud be the best fo my next experiences!!
Is there any chance at all you will be able to take your boots with you to your next experience?

IMO, the better the boot fits the sooner you will learn to compensate for differences between skis. It doesn't work the other way (better skis to compensate for differences between boots).

Do what you can (including carrying the boots on the plane with you instead of checking them as cargo) to make those as consistent as you possibly can.

If that is not possible, we will probably recommend softer and narrower and damper and more tapered skis than otherwise.
post #8 of 10
If you blame the Fischers for your less than stellar performance in the Alps, you need to credit the Elans for your better skiing in the Andes. I would tend to chalk up the difference to my personal skill development, take the blame for poor skiing in the past, and the credit for better skiing more recently.

I've never skied in South America or Europe, but I've skied with people who learned the sport in Europe and they tend to ski fast. South Americans, on the other hand, stereotypically tend to move at a more relaxed pace. Euros zipping by at Mach 10 might cause you to ski faster than what is ideal for your skill level. That could cause some chatter.

I once attended a two day clinic many years ago at a nearby hill, and I had forgotten to take my skis home with me, I had left them at another local ski area where I usually skied. So I used a pair of generic (crappy) rentals on the first day. The others in the clinic were on their own latest model, freshly tuned boards and were impressed with how well I was managing on the rentals. That evening I drove to my home area to get my skis for the following day. The second day of the clinic I didn't ski noticeably better on my own skis. I never really thought the skis mattered very much and this experience tended to validate that opinion.

I did however have my own boots both days as I was in the habit of bringing them home every night to dry them out. I think what others are suggesting indirectly is that you should think about buying some boots that fit well. Wearing boots that fit well is more important than being on the right ski.
post #9 of 10
Good well-fitted boots should be your first priority. Skiing with sloppy rentals is like driving a porsche 911, but only allowing yourself to steer vial having rubber bands attached to the steering wheel and your hands.

After you have your own good boots properly set up for your feet and alignment, you might want to subscribe to expertskier.com for their excellent reviews.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ok! Ok! I'll try to comment all ones !!!

"Is there any chance at all you will be able to take your boots with you to your next experience?"

Unfortunately, not yet!! I don't have boots. But after your concerns, I begin to consider it very seriously!! It will no be so easy, cos, you know we are coming from Brasil with lots of baggage(liners, underwear, gloves, clothes...) and also carrying a boot!! hey it will bee hilarious . But I agree "have your own good boots properly set up for your feet and alignment might" make all the difference.

"If you blame the Fischers for your less than stellar performance[...]credit the Elans for your better skiing in the Andes. [...] poor skiing in the past, and the credit for better skiing more recently"

You are absolutely right!!! The recently experience was enriched with the Fischers/Alps experience a lot.
I just need to point: I cannot say that Elans are better than Fishers. I'm trying(helped with your fantastic support) to figure out why I felt more "in control" with Elans and know that are there so many variables.


"I've never skied in South America or Europe[...] ski faster than what is ideal for your skill level.[..] Euros zipping by at Mach 10 might cause "

You are absolutely right again!!!
I can also say that, despite the "Mach 10 factor", keep noticed about how different are the pistes conditions. They commonly leave a big amount(1 meter tall X 2 wide of unpacked snow) between packed pistes, that said, in the middle of the day you get a very (small)bumps ski. Hey man, 5pm my legs hurts!!!!
But, once again, a big practice and a personal achievement on the skill level. I realize that later on Bariloche, where the pistes is... how can I say... not so well groomed.

Ok, my focus, from now should be toward the boots!!

Thanks folks!!
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