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Where the heck is...?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
/Rant on

You know what I hate? I hear about all these cool ski resorts, so I Google the name and find their home page. Right off the bat I'd like to know what country they are in, and of course what state if in the U.S.

But you know what? You go to their web sites and most of them don't even tell you where the resort or ski area is! Not the town, not the state, or what country. And if they have online maps it's just a tiny local map with the closest small town. They all sort of figure if you found the website you must already be familiar with the ski area and don't need to know where it is. (Just now it was Stevens Pass)

I usually have to dig to find the 'Contact Info' page to find their stinkin country and state! Sometimes it's only an Email address! ARGGH!

I have to Google more to find out where the heck they are!

Grrrrr...


/Rant off
post #2 of 23
Agreed. Many sites don't list the ski resort name. Annoying!
post #3 of 23
Stevens Pass is in Washington state. Its about 1.5 hours NE of Seattle off Highway 2.
post #4 of 23
many have interactive maps linked to say---google maps ---just pull back the perspective enough to see where you are.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post
/Rant on

You know what I hate? I hear about all these cool ski resorts, so I Google the name and find their home page. Right off the bat I'd like to know what country they are in, and of course what state if in the U.S.

But you know what? You go to their web sites and most of them don't even tell you where the resort or ski area is! Not the town, not the state, or what country. And if they have online maps it's just a tiny local map with the closest small town. They all sort of figure if you found the website you must already be familiar with the ski area and don't need to know where it is. (Just now it was Stevens Pass)

I usually have to dig to find the 'Contact Info' page to find their stinkin country and state! Sometimes it's only an Email address! ARGGH!

I have to Google more to find out where the heck they are!

Grrrrr...


/Rant off
from steven pass home page;

THE MOUNTAIN
Directions

Our Location

We're 78 miles east of Seattle on scenic U.S. Highway 2, up the Skykomish Valley. 78 miles east of Seattle, 65 miles east of Everett and 58 miles west of Wenatchee We are part of the beautiful "Cascade Loop."
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
from steven pass home page;

THE MOUNTAIN
Directions

Our Location

We're 78 miles east of Seattle on scenic U.S. Highway 2, up the Skykomish Valley. 78 miles east of Seattle, 65 miles east of Everett and 58 miles west of Wenatchee We are part of the beautiful "Cascade Loop."
Not much to go on there. They don't even tell you the state or even the country for cryin out loud. How is anyone supposed to find it?
post #7 of 23
In general, resort & ski area website homepages often fail to provide the info most visitors are seeking. My favorite pet peeve - opening & closing dates (at least during relevant time periods).

OTOH, consider that Stevens Pass is not a resort. Likewise the other western WA ski areas. People who ski these places are either locals (who obviously know where they are) or folks who have a pretty good idea of where they are going & why. With the exception of a few rooms at Xtal and a very, very limited smattering of options elsewhere - there is no nearby lodging. Out of town visitors usually have to be OK with "RV" camping or staying 20 min to 1.5 hours away...
post #8 of 23
Yeah, when I was looking for ski resort jobs a few weeks ago, I found myself on the main page kind of like "ok, sounds like a cool place...now...where the hell is it????" Happened a lot, but nothing a few clicks to the "Contact Us" page can't solve.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treewell View Post
Quote:
Our Location

We're 78 miles east of Seattle on scenic U.S. Highway 2, up the Skykomish Valley. 78 miles east of Seattle, 65 miles east of Everett and 58 miles west of Wenatchee We are part of the beautiful "Cascade Loop."
Not much to go on there. They don't even tell you the state or even the country for cryin out loud. How is anyone supposed to find it?
You honestly don't know what country and state 78 miles east of Seattle would be in?
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
You honestly don't know what country and state 78 miles east of Seattle would be in?
Is that in the Pacific ocean?

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
OTOH, consider that Stevens Pass is not a resort. Likewise the other western WA ski areas. People who ski these places are either locals (who obviously know where they are) or folks who have a pretty good idea of where they are going & why.
That's just an excuse. The real reason is they don't care about the world around them. All they care is the few towns around them.

And that's not just for ski resorts. Every business is like that. It takes a ski mountain, which by default attracts far away visitor, to show how ignorant most business owners and their marketing department are.

A related pet peeve of mine is restaurants in ski town. You call for direction, and they give it to you by way of landmarks such as some mom and pop shop, which you don't have any idea on because you don't live there!!! What are they thinking? All the dinners are locals?
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
You honestly don't know what country and state 78 miles east of Seattle would be in?
Too effn funny.
post #13 of 23
Every business - ski mountain or otherwise - should ask itself a) what constituencies are coming to my website? and b) what information can I provide that satisfies each of their needs and helps me build a relationship with them (hopefully a profitable one)?

The answer for western WA day use ski areas is different than for CO or UT resorts. I'm not saying Stevens and the other WA areas can't do better. They can. I am saying that their audience is not what most here think of as a resort audience. No meaningful lodging. No spas. No art galleries. No high end restaurants. Virtually no random out of state visitors. Unless something changes about the ski universe this page is pretty adequate for their needs (although they could make it a tiny bit more obvious): http://www.stevenspass.com/Stevens/t...irections.aspx That said, the marginal cost to serving up a page that in effect says "Stevens Pass WA" vs "Stevens Pass" is zero.

OTOH, I find it perplexing that many true resorts - ones that live and die by out of town visitation - are no better than our local hills when it comes to the location thing.

Just out of curiosity, who here has come from out of the PNW to western WA for a ski vacation without either having other business, local pals, or knowing you were seeking a particular flavor of skiing "off the beaten path"?
post #14 of 23
How did you land at the website.

just google "ski resorts"?

Or did you google the name of the resort?

Either way, it seems you would have a general idea
of the geographical location before you clicked on a place.

Did you want to go to WA?

Did you want to go to Yewtah?

Did you want to go to ColoRadBro?

Don't go to Tahoe. Or the Sierra. Totally sucks!

How did you land on the website?

What did you search for?

How did you have no idea of the geographic region you wanted to visit?
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
You honestly don't know what country and state 78 miles east of Seattle would be in?
Honestly I havn't a clue but let me guess:
It's in North Georgia somewhere near the Caucuses.
Am I right???
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treewell View Post
Not much to go on there. They don't even tell you the state or even the country for cryin out loud. How is anyone supposed to find it?
School maybe?
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post
That's just an excuse. The real reason is they don't care about the world around them. All they care is the few towns around them.
I forget that for most people the U.S. is the world, everywhere else is either third world or a terrorist. That is what they teach us in school now.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post
I forget that for most people the U.S. is the world, everywhere else is either third world or a terrorist. That is what they teach us in school now.
You sound like a terrorist. Are you for us, or for the terrorists? [/joke]

OP:
1 - enter the ski area name in google maps. http://maps.google.com/
2 - www.skibonk.com
3 - search the ski area name in skitown reviews, then click on the "resort information" link, then click on the "state map" option on the left hand panel, then look at the state map: http://www.skitown.com/resortguide/s...WA?sort=number . you can sort be location or by resort name.
post #19 of 23
This sort of usability problem is a symptom of businesses using local design firms for a medium totally out of their wheelhouse. This specific usability issue is particularly annoying because it has actually gotten more common in the last decade. You can say a lot of bad things about Early Web, but at least most Early Web designers were cognizant of the geographical indifference of the medium.

I love all the "solutions" people are addressing to the OP completely missing the point of the rant; that such things should be utterly unnecessary. I'm quite sure, for instance, the OP has heard of Google Maps...which does an utterly horrible job of locating many ski areas BTW.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
You can say a lot of bad things about Early Web, but at least most Early Web designers were cognizant of the geographical indifference of the medium.
In the early days, it's called the WORLD WIDE web.

Now, it's just a web.
post #21 of 23

its not just ski resorts

Try typing in the name of a town. You out just about everything piece of meaningless drivel that the web guys they hired for some outrageous fee can think of. Where the place actually is seems to be top secret.
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
This sort of usability problem is a symptom of businesses using local design firms for a medium totally out of their wheelhouse. This specific usability issue is particularly annoying because it has actually gotten more common in the last decade. You can say a lot of bad things about Early Web, but at least most Early Web designers were cognizant of the geographical indifference of the medium.

I love all the "solutions" people are addressing to the OP completely missing the point of the rant; that such things should be utterly unnecessary. I'm quite sure, for instance, the OP has heard of Google Maps...which does an utterly horrible job of locating many ski areas BTW.
Agree 100%. Most ski areas even somewhat large ones which attract people from out of state or out of the country do a horrible job explaining basic information that visitors will need.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post
/Rant on

You know what I hate? I hear about all these cool ski resorts, so I Google the name and find their home page. Right off the bat I'd like to know what country they are in, and of course what state if in the U.S.

But you know what? You go to their web sites and most of them don't even tell you where the resort or ski area is! Not the town, not the state, or what country.

/Rant off
It's like the old quote "if you have to ask, you'll never know". If you don't already know where it is, you're not cool enough to ski there.
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