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running with ankle weights...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
...where the weights are roughly equal to your boot/ski total, and doing this over a variety of terrains.

For the layman, it would seem to be the easiest way to practice and condition the body for the stress and balance requirements of skiing.

Any thoughts about using this in training?

(I did a search, and could not find this specific topic covered.)
post #2 of 14

it does sound logical

but every review ive ever seen warns against it.
even walking with ankle weights is prone to injury
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Right. But wouldn't those same reviewers say the same thing about going down a mountain, on snow!, with not only the weight of boot/binding/ski on each leg - - but the torque forces that they can generate.

I mean, if we're gonna ski (and take those risks), how can running with ankle weights be any more risky???

That's what I don't get...
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonSki View Post
...where the weights are roughly equal to your boot/ski total, and doing this over a variety of terrains.

For the layman, it would seem to be the easiest way to practice and condition the body for the stress and balance requirements of skiing.

Any thoughts about using this in training?

(I did a search, and could not find this specific topic covered.)
Everything I've seen seem s to contraindicate running or even walking with ankle weights. Stress on tendons,ligaments,and they change your stride.
What you have to ask is why do you need them?
Just up the intensity of your training. Stop running long distances.Run 200,400 &800 M sprints. Run hard up hills.
post #5 of 14
When I run, I lift my feet off the ground. When I ski I press my skis into the snow. Not the same stresses at all.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
When I run, I lift my feet off the ground. When I ski I press my skis into the snow. Not the same stresses at all.
post #7 of 14
Slow, longer distance running of 3-5 miles is best for baseline conditioning.

The you can add interval training on flat terrain and increase the intensity by adding hills.

For quad muscles you can do squats, lunges with light hand weights, etc.

Rollerblading and ice skating are good for quads and balance.

Cycling is also good.

I would avoid ankle weights as others have posted.

Core body strength and flexibility are important in skiing, especially in bumps and when you are trying to recover your balance, so ab work and yoga is good.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
When I run, I lift my feet off the ground. When I ski I press my skis into the snow.
Of course. But going through mogul fields, crud, etc. certainly puts up-down type movement and stress on joints, ligaments, tendons, etc. - - all with the weight of your boot/binding/ski on each leg, plus the torque.

I too understand in a general sense that ankle weights are not good, hence the reason for this thread.

But I thought it might be more for the general population, rather than skiers. Which other sports use the weight and torque that we do on our feet?

(Though I know for a fact that some elite mixed-martial-arts fighters do train with ankle weights.)

Anyway, thanks for the responses and recommendations. I will just stick with the normal conditioning exercises.
post #9 of 14
Yes, but the knee is hardly ever if at all under tension. You are either compressing it as you absorb, or you are compressing it as you extend. The added resistance of the inertia from the weight would be far better acquired by running in sand or water imho.

Also I'm not too sure what mixed martial artists do is all that healthy. Eg. cumulative brain injury from being hit in the head and all.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Yes, but the knee is hardly ever if at all under tension. You are either compressing it as you absorb, or you are compressing it as you extend.
Yeah, I think that makes sense - - and I think that is the answer I was looking for. thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Also I'm not too sure what mixed martial artists do is all that healthy. Eg. cumulative brain injury from being hit in the head and all.
Yeah again. Though I took a few good head/face shots when skiing with runaway straps, back in the day.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
When I run, I lift my feet off the ground. When I ski I press my skis into the snow. Not the same stresses at all.
When you run, you lift your feet off the ground and press your foot on ground. You do both, right.

Running up hill for shorter distances will increase the work being done.

If you want to add weight wear a vest or add weight with a belt. But running hills is even better. It kills.

Adding ankle weights will also mess with your coordination and accuracy. An example would be a pro quaterback practicing with a heavy football for conditioning. That's an extream example but why play games with the athletics.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Adding ankle weights will also mess with your coordination and accuracy. An example would be a pro quaterback practicing with a heavy football for conditioning. That's an extream example but why play games with the athletics.
But we do ski with that weight on our "ankles" - - that is, the boot/binding/ski weight. So it is not like practicing with a heavy football.

Running with ankle weights would equal the actual "game day" weight of skiing.

But I do think the "compression" (version extension) point made by Ghost makes sense, and is the deciding factor.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
Everything I've seen seem s to contraindicate running or even walking with ankle weights. Stress on tendons,ligaments,and they change your stride.
What you have to ask is why do you need them?
Just up the intensity of your training. Stop running long distances.Run 200,400 &800 M sprints. Run hard up hills.
What he said! Sorry, overseas with expensive Internet time, otherwise I'd elaborate!
post #14 of 14
Very bad for your knees, ankles, hips, toes....

Running is a completely different movement than skiing. Each step is an impact. Adding weight increases the impact. Also placing a weight on your ankle, creates a pendulum effect on your knees and hips.

If you want to try something low impact, that involves running...

Get a life vest and run suspended in the water.

Better yet go against some current.
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